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RE: [E_Rapier] Rigid Parry Question

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  • Eve Harris & David Stamper
    Hoskuld has used something like this for years and I don’t recall any complaints about it. His axe handle is made from a piece of doweling. Albrecht _____
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 23, 2007
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      Hoskuld has used something like this for years and I don’t recall any
      complaints about it. His axe handle is made from a piece of doweling.



      Albrecht



      _____

      From: E_Rapier@yahoogroups.com [mailto:E_Rapier@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      Of Griffin de Stokeport
      Sent: August 23, 2007 2:14 AM
      To: E_Rapier@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [E_Rapier] Rigid Parry Question



      > C. Devices that predictably cause entangling of an opponent or their
      > equipment, either by design
      > or by repeated mishap, are not allowed.

      In keeping with the Norman persona I have going (yes... a 12C Norman
      that fences.. go figure) I'd like to make an axe-shaped rigid parry
      device. I wouldn't make the axe head very sharply inclined - probably no
      more than a 1/4 circle (at the very most) for the top and bottom curves
      of the axe-head. Basically, it would exist to hook a blade briefly,
      steer it out of harms way (and my squishy bits) and then let it go. I
      could make it out of a thin rattan stick (coated in tape obviously) and
      foam with duct tape for the head so as to not damage anyone's blade.

      Opinions? The MiT in me says that the axe-head isn't "entangling" the
      blade but simply steering it and forcing the opponent to withdraw and
      redirect their blade (of course leaving themselves open to attack...). I
      see it this way as it doesn't actually lock or trap (ie: entangle) the
      blade, just forces it out of the way with a bit more effect than a
      simple stick. However, I realize this can quickly become a debate over
      vocabulary. Thus, I ask all those who read this for their learned opinions.

      My thanks,
      Griffin of 'Thule





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John Enzinas
      I ve always defined entangling as capturing the blade (not the hilt) in such a way that if the sword s holder lets go the blade does not fall. I can t think
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 23, 2007
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        I've always defined entangling as capturing the blade (not the hilt)
        in such a way that if the sword's holder lets go the blade does not
        fall. I can't think of any way that you could do that with an axe
        head. In addition there are lots of people who use sticks with hooks
        or other types of cane heads and those are perfectly legal.

        The only risk, IMO, is if you make it too realistic such that your
        opponent could mistake it for a real axe. This would be against the
        rules.

        For those who have not seen it, Hoskuld's axe does not have this problem.

        --j

        On 8/23/07, Griffin de Stokeport <griffin@...> wrote:
        > > C. Devices that predictably cause entangling of an opponent or their
        > > equipment, either by design
        > > or by repeated mishap, are not allowed.
        >
        > In keeping with the Norman persona I have going (yes... a 12C Norman
        > that fences.. go figure) I'd like to make an axe-shaped rigid parry
        > device. I wouldn't make the axe head very sharply inclined - probably no
        > more than a 1/4 circle (at the very most) for the top and bottom curves
        > of the axe-head. Basically, it would exist to hook a blade briefly,
        > steer it out of harms way (and my squishy bits) and then let it go. I
        > could make it out of a thin rattan stick (coated in tape obviously) and
        > foam with duct tape for the head so as to not damage anyone's blade.
        >
        > Opinions? The MiT in me says that the axe-head isn't "entangling" the
        > blade but simply steering it and forcing the opponent to withdraw and
        > redirect their blade (of course leaving themselves open to attack...). I
        > see it this way as it doesn't actually lock or trap (ie: entangle) the
        > blade, just forces it out of the way with a bit more effect than a
        > simple stick. However, I realize this can quickly become a debate over
        > vocabulary. Thus, I ask all those who read this for their learned opinions.
        >
        > My thanks,
        > Griffin of 'Thule
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Kathleen Gormanshaw
        ... Don t worry, we ve had fencing Vikings in the area before :-) ... It will be beautiful. If it fits the period, extend the ax part over the back side of
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 23, 2007
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          At 02:13 AM 8/23/2007, you wrote:
          >In keeping with the Norman persona I have going (yes... a 12C Norman
          >that fences.. go figure)

          Don't worry, we've had fencing Vikings in the area before :-)

          >I'd like to make an axe-shaped rigid parry
          >device. I wouldn't make the axe head very sharply inclined - probably no
          >more than a 1/4 circle (at the very most) for the top and bottom curves
          >of the axe-head.

          It will be beautiful. If it fits the period, extend the ax part over
          the back side of the haft, so that you end up with 4 places to hook a
          blade, though only the one under the head is large, the other three
          will work as well.

          Our ax head was made by cutting bits of foam and wrapping it tightly
          with duct tape. I'd recommend NOT wrapping it as tightly as you can
          go, ours is so thoroughly compressed that it has no give, and you
          wouldn't think it was foam without cutting it open.

          I'd also stick with a hardwood dowel for a handle. I've had no
          complaints about damaging other people, and we've been using it for
          years. But the hardwood will stand up to rapiers and a rattan stick
          will not, it will breakdown and turn into dust. (And since I'm
          allergic to that dust, I won't fence you with it if I know it's rattan.)

          >Opinions? The MiT in me says that the axe-head isn't "entangling" the

          You should have no problems.

          Eyrny
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