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ETX 90 RA versus Edmund Scientifics Astroscan

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  • manuel_mendoza_md
    In your opinion which one would make a better scope, if you had to pick one. Anticipate no astrophotography needs; planetary/moon/star observations mostly.
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 1, 2002
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      In your opinion which one would make a better scope, if you had to
      pick one. Anticipate no astrophotography needs; planetary/moon/star
      observations mostly. To me they seems comparable.
    • edutton
      Manuel, Completely different scopes. ETX90 has a high power narrow field of view, the Astroscan has a low power wide field of view. I have both a Astroscan
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 1, 2002
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        Manuel,

        Completely different scopes. ETX90 has a high power narrow field of
        view, the Astroscan has a low power wide field of view. I have both a
        Astroscan and ETX 125 (well, had a 125 until UPS destroyed it.) The
        Astroscan does not allow magnification above about 40x (you can go
        higher but the distortion is very distracting. With a ETX90, it will be
        hard to find an eyepiece that will give less than 40x. The Astroscan
        mount has no fixed axis which can make navigating the sky a real
        challenge. The ETX90 has the capability to operate in the polar mode
        with usable setting circles, slow motion controls, and a clock drive.
        The Astroscan gives beautiful views of relatively large portions of the
        sky but you may not know where it is pointing. The Astroscan is
        virtually worthless on the planets, but the narrow field of the ETX90
        misses some of the great sites of the sky. At $149 (Astronomics) or even
        $199 to $250 for a ETX90RA, or close to $250- $300 for an Astroscan,
        I'd take the ETX in a heart beat, although you really need both. I'll
        probably will be replacing my old original ETX-125 with a ETX-105, which
        is exactly the same aperture as the Astroscan and I won't even remotely
        consider getting rid of the Astroscan.

        Ells

        manuel_mendoza_md wrote:

        > In your opinion which one would make a better scope, if you had to
        > pick one. Anticipate no astrophotography needs; planetary/moon/star
        > observations mostly. To me they seems comparable.
        >
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      • manuel_mendoza_md
        Ells, Thanks for you thoughts on this matter. I have been struggling with this decision for several weeks. When I saw the special @ Astronomics my decision
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 1, 2002
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          Ells,

          Thanks for you thoughts on this matter. I have been struggling with
          this decision for several weeks. When I saw the special @
          Astronomics my decision became even harder. Have been doing the
          usual background reading in Sky & Telescope, Astronomy
          and "Nightwatch" to help in the process.

          After a very long absence from astronomy (over 20 years) I have
          decided to jump back in. My first scope was a 3 inch reflector from
          ES, in the late 70's. Now seemed like a good time to get back to
          it. At first I wanted to jump into an LX 90 but after much
          rummination it felt like I would be bitting too much at a time.
          Plus the portability factor is important as, even though I live in a
          rural area, light pollution is a factor so travel is expected.

          I just could not resist the $150 ETX 90 RA offer, so I ordered a
          pair (one as a gift). I am still considering the Astroscan or
          perhaps a 6 inch Dobsonian as they seem to be in the same price
          range, although the portability factor may reign supreme. I also
          would like my kids to observe with me at times. My 3 year old may
          be hard to get interested but my 6 year old daughter is very
          interested already.

          I also though about getting a ETX 90EC or a ETX 125EC GoTo scopes,
          but thought that perhaps I should save the cash (or get a second
          scope such as the Astroscan/Dobsonian, in addition to the ETX 90RA)
          for an LX 200 or LX 90 in the future.

          Any other thoughts would be appreciated.

          Manuel
          --- In ETXASTRO@y..., edutton <edutton@i...> wrote:
          > Manuel,
          >
          > Completely different scopes. ETX90 has a high power narrow field
          of
          > view, the Astroscan has a low power wide field of view. I have
          both a
          > Astroscan and ETX 125 (well, had a 125 until UPS destroyed it.)
          The
          > Astroscan does not allow magnification above about 40x (you can go
          > higher but the distortion is very distracting. With a ETX90, it
          will be
          > hard to find an eyepiece that will give less than 40x. The
          Astroscan
          > mount has no fixed axis which can make navigating the sky a real
          > challenge. The ETX90 has the capability to operate in the polar
          mode
          > with usable setting circles, slow motion controls, and a clock
          drive.
          > The Astroscan gives beautiful views of relatively large portions
          of the
          > sky but you may not know where it is pointing. The Astroscan is
          > virtually worthless on the planets, but the narrow field of the
          ETX90
          > misses some of the great sites of the sky. At $149 (Astronomics)
          or even
          > $199 to $250 for a ETX90RA, or close to $250- $300 for an
          Astroscan,
          > I'd take the ETX in a heart beat, although you really need both.
          I'll
          > probably will be replacing my old original ETX-125 with a ETX-105,
          which
          > is exactly the same aperture as the Astroscan and I won't even
          remotely
          > consider getting rid of the Astroscan.
          >
          > Ells
          >
        • Ralph Encarnacion
          Manuel, Now that you have ordered your ETX-90RA, I think you will be very happy. I would forget about the Astroscan and would look at getting one of the many
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 1, 2002
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            Manuel,
            Now that you have ordered your ETX-90RA, I think you will be very happy. I
            would forget about the Astroscan and would look at getting one of the many
            short tube refractors instead. Main reason I say that is because you are
            very limited in the way you can mount the Astroscan. The refractor, you can
            put on a good tracking mount. As a matter of fact you can turn both your ETX
            and your short tube into fully computerized go-to scopes for very little
            money. I have an ETX-90RA and a Stellarvue AT-1010 refractor that I have
            them mounted on a modified Meade DS-70EC computerized go-to mount. I can use
            either scope with the mount. You can see some pictures of the ETX mounted on
            the DS-70EC mount here: http://www.pbase.com/panotaker/poormans_lx200 You
            can see the Stellarvue on the same mount here:
            http://www.pbase.com/image/2420425/original The Stellarvue gives me the low
            power wide field views.
            Ralph
          • Phil De Rosa
            Manuel, I have an ETX 90 EC, and I think you will be happy with the 90 RA for a first scope. Portability will see it used more, and that is always good.
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 1, 2002
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              Manuel,
              I have an ETX 90 EC, and I think you will be happy with the 90 RA for a
              first scope. Portability will see it used more, and that is always good.
              Excellent for the moon and for solar observing (with the proper filter), as
              well as much more.

              I also have 4 1/2" and 6" reflectors, equatorially mounted, (as well as a
              couple of other scopes) and they don't go out the door as quickly. I am
              considering making an 8" Dob mount travel scope, as time permits. The 6"
              dob would still be fairly portable, quick, and provide much more light grasp
              than the 90 RA. Once you start learning your way around, you will start to
              crave more aperture. But you still need to transport whatever you have in
              order to use it.

              I have thought about getting a short tube refractor, as Ralph has suggested,
              and I probably will in the future, but the ETX came along first. And I have
              been told that if any more scopes come in the door, I might be going out the
              door.

              There is no such thing as "the perfect scope"....
              ...Phil
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