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Bacteria batteries for mobile phones

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  • RemyC
    From: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2005/02/10/nbact10.xml&sSheet=/news/2005/02/10/ixhome.html via: http://www.mobilepcmag.com Bacteria
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 25, 2005
      From:
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2005/02/10/nbact10.xml&sSheet=/news/2005/02/10/ixhome.html
      via: http://www.mobilepcmag.com

      Bacteria batteries for mobile phones
      By Roger Highfield, Science Editor
      (Filed: 10/02/2005)

      Mobile telephones and other portable electronic devices could one day be
      powered with the help of bacteria, thanks to an advance in energy
      technology.

      Fuel cells offer an efficient and environmentally friendly way to make
      electricity by combining oxygen and hydrogen, but are expensive because they
      rely on a platinum catalyst.

      Now a team at the John Innes Centre, Norwich, reports in the journal Nature
      that it has built the active part of a bacterial enzyme that works like a
      miniature hydrogen fuel cell. The research, published by Prof Chris Pickett
      and American and Italian colleagues, could help scientists to replace the
      expensive platinum catalysts that break up molecules of hydrogen gas,
      releasing electrons that generate an electrical current.

      chris.pickett@ bbsrc.ac.uk
      http://www.jic.bbsrc.ac.uk/staff/chris-pickett/index.htm
      John Innes Centre
      Norwich Research Park
      Colney Norwich NR4 7UH UK
      Tel: 44 (0) 1603 450703 Fax: 44 (0) 1603 450018

      Chameleon Biosurfaces Ltd:
      http://www.chameleonbio.com

      Prof Pickett said: "In nature iron-sulphur enzymes catalyse a range of
      important chemical reactions that industry can only do by using precious
      metal catalysts and/or high temperatures and pressures."

      Small fuel cells for powering consumer products such as laptops and mobile
      telephones should be on the market in mid 2006.
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