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Out of Gas by David Goodstein

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  • RemyC
    From: http://www.wwnorton.com/catalog/fall03/005857.htm Out of Gas: The End of the Age of Oil by David Goodstein $21.95 Hardcover 128 pages Published February
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 21, 2004
      From:
      http://www.wwnorton.com/catalog/fall03/005857.htm

      Out of Gas: The End of the Age of Oil
      by David Goodstein

      $21.95 Hardcover 128 pages
      Published February 2nd 2004
      ISBN: 0393058573

      W. W. NORTON & COMPANY, INC.
      500 Fifth Avenue
      New York, N.Y. 10110
      Tel 212-354-5500
      Fax 212-869-0856

      Publicity Contact:
      Rachel Salzman
      Fax 212-869-0856
      publicity@ wwnorton.com

      Book Description

      Science tells us that an oil crisis is inevitable. Why and when? And what
      will our future look like without our favorite fuel?

      Our rate of oil discovery has reached its peak and will never be exceeded;
      rather, it is certain to decline-perhaps rapidly-forever forward. Meanwhile,
      over the past century, we have developed lifestyles firmly rooted in the
      promise of an endless, cheap supply. In this book, David Goodstein,
      professor of physics at Caltech, explains the underlying scientific
      principles of the inevitable fossil fuel shortage we face. He outlines the
      drastic effects a fossil fuel shortage will bring down on us. And he shows
      that there is an important silver lining to the need to switch to other
      sources of energy, for when we have burned up all the available oil, the
      earth's climate will have moved toward a truly life-threatening state.

      With its easy-to-grasp explanations of the science behind every aspect of
      our most urgent environmental policy decisions, Out of Gas is a handbook for
      the future of civilization. Charts, graphs, photographs.

      About the Author

      David Goodstein, vice provost and Frank J. Galloon Distinguished Teaching
      and Service Professor at the California Institute of Technology, is the
      author of Feynman's Lost Lecture, among other works.

      http://www.its.caltech.edu/~dg
      dg@ cco.caltech.edu
      California Institute of Technology
      Vice Provost's Office
      104 Parsons-Gates - Mail Code 104-31
      Pasadena, CA 91125
      626.395.6365 Fax: 626.796.7820

      Judy Post
      Administrative Assistant
      626.395.6339

      Phase Transitions and States of Matter
      Prof. David Goodstein's Group
      Condensed Matter Physics
      http://www.cmp.caltech.edu/~dggroup
      (lab): 626-395-2953

      Energy, Technology and Climate: Running Out of Gas (PDF File)
      http://www.its.caltech.edu/~dg/Essay2.pdf

      Editorial Reviews

      From Booklist

      In this pithy primer on what might replace oil as civilization's fuel, a
      Caltech professor explains the fundamentals of energy, engines, and entropy
      for a mass audience. Goodstein opens with a quote from a geologist who
      predicted in the 1950s, to derision, that U.S. oil reserves would inevitably
      be depleted. Applying this reasoning to global reserves, Goodstein warns not
      only that the last drop will be pumped by 2100 at the latest, but also that
      peak production, estimated to occur in the current decade, marks the
      beginning of a global shortage. So, start planning postpetroleum technology
      now, exhorts the author. With exceptional conciseness, he presents the
      constraints nature will impose on any fuel-technology combination, beginning
      with explanations of exploitable sources of energy, continuing with how
      chemical and nuclear bonds hold and release energy, and arriving at how any
      engine, in principle, converts energy to work. Looking at fuels such as
      methane or hydrogen, Goodstein sees not panaceas but, rather, life support
      until a future arrives that lives on sunlight and nuclear fusion. Gilbert
      Taylor

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