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National EmComm Traffic Nets...

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  • Frank
    NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE (N.E.T.S.) Freq s on Bottom.. The NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE uses designated watch and calling frequencies. Public
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 22, 2010
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      NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE  (N.E.T.S.) Freq's on Bottom..

       

      The NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE uses designated watch and calling frequencies.   Public service amateur radio operators everywhere are invited to monitor these frequencies whenever possible.  But when disasters or other incidents occur, Emcomm operators are asked to warm up their radios and "light up" the NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE..."24/7".  Active operators know which bands are most likely to be "open" depending upon the time of day, season, etc.

      During disasters and for other emergencies, the frequencies are "open nets".  When traffic becomes heavy, they will become "command and control" frequencies with a net control station "triaging" traffic and directing stations with traffic to another (traffic) frequency.  (At least 5 kHz away.)  Proper net procedures are essential.

      NETS does not maintain regular schedules and does not handle routine "make work" messages such as birthday greetings, "your license is about to expire", "book messages", etc.  NETS is intended to supplement and fortify other networks by providing a vehicle for Emcomm operators to originate, relay and deliver legal radio message traffic (I.e. - "first class mail") of any precedence, at any time, from and to anyone and anywhere--especially during disasters or other crises.  NETS stations will cooperate and use other networks that are known to be capable of accurately and efficiently handling RADIOGRAMS.

      NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE (NETS) WATCH • MONITOR • CALLING • TRAFFIC FREQUENCIES
      All listed frequencies (except 60 meters) are nominal.  Actual nets may be up or down as much as 20 kHz
      SSB:
      •   1982 kHz

      •   3911 kHz RADIO RESCUE (SSB and CW)
      •   5332 kHz "Up" to other 60M channels as necessary. 50W maximum ERP. (Activated during actual incidents.)
      •   7214 kHz
      • 14280 kHz
      • ALASKA ONLY: 5167.5 kHz (USB emergency traffic only)

      CW:
      •   1911 kHz
      •   3540 kHz
      •   3911 kHz RADIO RESCUE (SSB and CW)
      •   7111 kHz
      • 10119 kHz

      • 14050 kHz
      • ALASKA - 3540/7042/14050 kHz
      • GULF STATES (LA, MS, TX, AL) - 7111 kHz 1100Z-2300Z / 3570 kHz 2300Z-1100Z

        During EMERGENCIES: 7111 kHz daytime, 3570 kHz nighttime.

        (Times approximate depending on band conditions and changes in sunrise/sunset.)


      VHF/UHF FM
      • LOCAL EMCOMM SIMPLEX - 146.55 MHz
      • RED CROSS EMCOMM SIMPLEX - 147.42 MHz
      • NATIONAL CALLING SIMPLEX - 146.52 MHz 

      Frequencies listed may be on or near other established net frequencies.

      As a matter of operating courtesy, always move up or down a few kHz to avoid QRM when a frequency is in use.

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