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The Words We Use: Living As If School Doesn't Exist

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  • Carolyn
    So, I frequently post things here about unschooling. My family have been Radical Unschoolers for about 5 years and LOVE IT. I truly think it is the most
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 28, 2013
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      So, I frequently post things here about unschooling. My family have been Radical Unschoolers for about 5 years and LOVE IT. I truly think it is the most authentic way to live. However, I never want anyone here to think that this is the only way to homeschool or even the best route for everyone. Ok, maybe I do think that, but I don't want anyone to be hesitant to post about other methods, or ask for advice on curriculum. My strongest belief is that schools are not good for children. Period. I also believe that as a society we have been brainwashed for the last 150 years into believing that there are certain things a person must be taught and if a person doesn't learn that by a certain age they are somehow deficient.

      Comparing children is NEVER a good idea. How would you like it if someone came to your house and said they were going to test YOU to see if you measure up to people your own age. Maybe they want to see how much of the stuff you were taught in school you still remember. What was that stuff and why did we need to be taught it? I can't remember.

      Children are so good at learning what interests them AND what they see being modeled by the significant others in their world. If they see you doing what you really love, helping others, treating people kindly (especially your children!) and expanding your own knowledge, they will understand that that is a good way to live. A child who knows how to find answers, accept bad decisions (and walk away from them), speak kindly and follow their passions is going to be more prepared for the adult world than one who has been drilled in meaningless subjects, taught to leave one project because it is "time" to move on to something else, taught to conform and not to care about their owns interests, and feels themselves to be a failure because they somehow don't measure up to the other kids. Our homeschooled kids are living in the real world and this will serve them well.

      Anyway, ramblings aside, here's a link to an essay about the terminology associated with unschooling. http://www.lifelearningmagazine.com/definitions/the_words_we_use_living_as_if_school_doesnt_exist.htm

      Namaste,
      Carolyn
    • kadishiraven
      Great thoughts! I think we re sort of on the opposite end of the spectrum from you (we re more or less classical/Well-Trained Mind here) but I love hearing
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 28, 2013
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        Great thoughts! I think we're sort of on the opposite end of the spectrum from you (we're more or less classical/Well-Trained Mind here) but I love hearing about other family's journeys.

        I have always wondered about adults who were unschooled--I found a few in some books I read from the library, but maybe you can point me at some. I'm sure they're successful, I've just always been curious what unschoolers grow up and do! It seems like it'd be hard to work a McJob. :)

        --- In ECHO-NV@yahoogroups.com, "Carolyn" <nevadafiddler@...> wrote:
        >
        > So, I frequently post things here about unschooling. My family have been Radical Unschoolers for about 5 years and LOVE IT. I truly think it is the most authentic way to live. However, I never want anyone here to think that this is the only way to homeschool or even the best route for everyone. Ok, maybe I do think that, but I don't want anyone to be hesitant to post about other methods, or ask for advice on curriculum. My strongest belief is that schools are not good for children. Period. I also believe that as a society we have been brainwashed for the last 150 years into believing that there are certain things a person must be taught and if a person doesn't learn that by a certain age they are somehow deficient.
        >
        > Comparing children is NEVER a good idea. How would you like it if someone came to your house and said they were going to test YOU to see if you measure up to people your own age. Maybe they want to see how much of the stuff you were taught in school you still remember. What was that stuff and why did we need to be taught it? I can't remember.
        >
        > Children are so good at learning what interests them AND what they see being modeled by the significant others in their world. If they see you doing what you really love, helping others, treating people kindly (especially your children!) and expanding your own knowledge, they will understand that that is a good way to live. A child who knows how to find answers, accept bad decisions (and walk away from them), speak kindly and follow their passions is going to be more prepared for the adult world than one who has been drilled in meaningless subjects, taught to leave one project because it is "time" to move on to something else, taught to conform and not to care about their owns interests, and feels themselves to be a failure because they somehow don't measure up to the other kids. Our homeschooled kids are living in the real world and this will serve them well.
        >
        > Anyway, ramblings aside, here's a link to an essay about the terminology associated with unschooling. http://www.lifelearningmagazine.com/definitions/the_words_we_use_living_as_if_school_doesnt_exist.htm
        >
        > Namaste,
        > Carolyn
        >
      • kadishiraven
        Forgot to sign my name-- Breanna
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 28, 2013
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          Forgot to sign my name--

          Breanna
          :)

          --- In ECHO-NV@yahoogroups.com, "kadishiraven" <breanna.teintze@...> wrote:
          >
          > Great thoughts! I think we're sort of on the opposite end of the spectrum from you (we're more or less classical/Well-Trained Mind here) but I love hearing about other family's journeys.
          >
          > I have always wondered about adults who were unschooled--I found a few in some books I read from the library, but maybe you can point me at some. I'm sure they're successful, I've just always been curious what unschoolers grow up and do! It seems like it'd be hard to work a McJob. :)
          >
          > --- In ECHO-NV@yahoogroups.com, "Carolyn" <nevadafiddler@> wrote:
          > >
          > > So, I frequently post things here about unschooling. My family have been Radical Unschoolers for about 5 years and LOVE IT. I truly think it is the most authentic way to live. However, I never want anyone here to think that this is the only way to homeschool or even the best route for everyone. Ok, maybe I do think that, but I don't want anyone to be hesitant to post about other methods, or ask for advice on curriculum. My strongest belief is that schools are not good for children. Period. I also believe that as a society we have been brainwashed for the last 150 years into believing that there are certain things a person must be taught and if a person doesn't learn that by a certain age they are somehow deficient.
          > >
          > > Comparing children is NEVER a good idea. How would you like it if someone came to your house and said they were going to test YOU to see if you measure up to people your own age. Maybe they want to see how much of the stuff you were taught in school you still remember. What was that stuff and why did we need to be taught it? I can't remember.
          > >
          > > Children are so good at learning what interests them AND what they see being modeled by the significant others in their world. If they see you doing what you really love, helping others, treating people kindly (especially your children!) and expanding your own knowledge, they will understand that that is a good way to live. A child who knows how to find answers, accept bad decisions (and walk away from them), speak kindly and follow their passions is going to be more prepared for the adult world than one who has been drilled in meaningless subjects, taught to leave one project because it is "time" to move on to something else, taught to conform and not to care about their owns interests, and feels themselves to be a failure because they somehow don't measure up to the other kids. Our homeschooled kids are living in the real world and this will serve them well.
          > >
          > > Anyway, ramblings aside, here's a link to an essay about the terminology associated with unschooling. http://www.lifelearningmagazine.com/definitions/the_words_we_use_living_as_if_school_doesnt_exist.htm
          > >
          > > Namaste,
          > > Carolyn
          > >
          >
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