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Meeting students interests and needs

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  • sciquest2000
    Years ago used to give a personal information sheet for my students to fill out at the beginning of the year. I stopped this in lieu of a Learning Styles
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 1, 2003
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      Years ago used to give a personal information sheet for my students
      to fill out at the beginning of the year. I stopped this in lieu of
      a Learning Styles Inventory sheet to see how they best study and
      learn material. But I don't think this alone will help with meeting
      the students interest buy choosing topics relative to them teaching
      inquiry.
      Would anyone share what they used to indicate how they got know
      their students interests?

      Thanks

      Science Teacher
    • Karen Cahoon
      Why is the topic you are teaching important in their lives? For example, I did weather. So I related it to how weather was an important aspect in their
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 1, 2003
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        Why is the topic you are teaching important in their lives? For
        example, I did weather. So I related it to how weather was an important
        aspect in their lives, not only as a student but how it related to them
        as they became an adult. I did not view that question as whether it
        interested them personally. I focused on why it was important for them
        to have this info and how it could be related to them outside the
        classroom. Living on the coast, the study of hurricanes is something
        they will need to know about to stay safe for a long time.
        Karen
        NBCT EASCI '03

        >>> eden908@... 12/01/03 8:02 AM >>>
      • Stacy Cordes
        I learn the most by visiting with my kids and their parents. This is done both informally - study hall, lunch, etc. and during class discussion. They will
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 1, 2003
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          I learn the most by visiting with my kids and their parents.  This is done both informally - study hall, lunch, etc. and during class discussion.  They will often discuss where they have been or what they watch - ex: Discovery Channel.  Always listen for direct and indirect infor the kids give you.
          Good luck, s

          sciquest2000 <eden908@...> wrote:
          Years ago used to give a personal information sheet for my students
          to fill out at the beginning of the year.  I stopped this in lieu of
          a Learning Styles Inventory sheet to see how they best study and
          learn material.  But I don't think this alone will help with meeting
          the students interest buy choosing topics relative to them teaching
          inquiry. 
          Would anyone share what they used to indicate how they got know
          their students interests?

          Thanks

          Science Teacher



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        • sciquest2000
          Thanks for the replies. But concerning weather, I was going to do exactly what you had done. We live in tornado alley. And boy do I have a lot to contribute
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 1, 2003
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            Thanks for the replies. But concerning weather, I was going to do
            exactly what you had done. We live in tornado alley. And boy do I
            have a lot to contribute if I did this topic. However when I viewed
            the National Standards, it does not include Weather and Climate for
            grades 5-8 only for K-4. If I am mistaken, I would like for someone
            to correct me on that.However it is required of us to teach it in
            the 8th grade for our state standardized tests.

            In regard to parents, I meet with parents very little in a social
            climate. Our school can have transistory students and I don't think
            at this point I want to say why. So I would need to probably give
            something to students on day when our work load is not so busy and
            have them work in cooperative groups to discuss and record
            information about themselves and science.

            Also I found a web site that would print linear graphs of student
            data if anyone is interested in this as well.

            Thanks again for your replies.

            The science teacher!!
          • Donna M. Petty
            Read carefully - I ll try to Bold the weather part for grades 5-8: Earth and Space Science CONTENT STANDARD D: As a result of their activities in grades 5-8,
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 1, 2003
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              Read carefully - I'll try to "Bold" the weather part for grades 5-8:
               

              Earth and Space Science

              CONTENT STANDARD D:
              As a result of their activities in grades 5-8, all students should develop an understanding of

              • Structure of the earth system
              • Earth's history
              • Earth in the solar system

              DEVELOPING STUDENT UNDERSTANDING

              A major goal of science in the middle grades is for students to develop an understanding of earth and the solar system as a set of closely coupled systems. The idea of systems provides a framework in which students can investigate the four major interacting components of the earth system--geosphere (crust, mantle, and core), hydro-sphere (water), atmosphere (air), and the biosphere (the realm of all living things). In this holistic approach to studying the planet, physical, chemical, and biological processes act within and among the four components on a wide range of time scales to change continuously earth's crust, oceans, atmosphere, and living organisms. Students can investigate the water and rock cycles as introductory examples of geophysical and geochemical cycles. Their study of earth's history provides some evidence about co-evolution of the planet's main features--the distribution of land and sea, features of the crust, the composition of the atmosphere, global climate, and populations of living organisms in the biosphere.

              By plotting the locations of volcanoes and earthquakes, students can see a pattern of geological activity. Earth has an outermost rigid shell called the lithosphere. It is made up of the crust and part of the upper mantle. It is broken into about a dozen rigid plates that move without deforming, except at boundaries where they collide. Those plates range in thickness from a few to more than 100 kilometers. Ocean floors are the tops of thin oceanic plates that spread outward from midocean rift zones; land surfaces are the tops of thicker, less-dense continental plates.

              Because students do not have direct contact with most of these phenomena and the long-term nature of the processes, some explanations of moving plates and the evolution of life must be reserved for late in grades 5-8. As students mature, the concept of evaporation can be reasonably well understood as the conservation of matter combined with a primitive idea of particles and the idea that air is real. Condensation is less well understood and requires extensive observation and instruction to complete an understanding of the water cycle.

              The understanding that students gain from their observations in grades K-4 provides the motivation and the basis from which they can begin to construct a model that explains the visual and physical relationships among earth, sun, moon, and the solar system. Direct observation and satellite data allow students to conclude that earth is a moving, spherical planet, having unique features that distinguish it from other planets in the solar system. From activities with trajectories and orbits and using the earth-sun-moon system as an example, students can develop the understanding that gravity is a ubiquitous force that holds all parts of the solar system together. Energy from the sun transferred by light and other radiation is the primary energy source for processes on earth's surface and in its hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere.

              By grades 5-8, students have a clear notion about gravity, the shape of the earth, and the relative positions of the earth, sun, and moon. Nevertheless, more than half of the students will not be able to use these models to explain the phases of the moon, and correct explanations for the seasons will be even more difficult to achieve.

              GUIDE TO THE CONTENT STANDARD

              Fundamental concepts and principles that underlie this standard include

              STRUCTURE OF THE EARTH SYSTEM

              • The solid earth is layered with a lithosphere; hot, convecting mantle; and dense, metallic core.
              • Lithospheric plates on the scales of continents and oceans constantly move at rates of centimeters per year in response to movements in the mantle. Major geological events, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and mountain building, result from these plate motions.[See Content Standard F (grades 5-8) ]
              • Land forms are the result of a combination of constructive and destructive forces. Constructive forces include crustal deformation, volcanic eruption, and deposition of sediment, while destructive forces include weathering and erosion.
              • Some changes in the solid earth can be described as the "rock cycle." Old rocks at the earth's surface weather, forming sediments that are buried, then compacted, heated, and often recrystallized into new rock. Eventually, those new rocks may be brought to the surface by the forces that drive plate motions, and the rock cycle continues.
              • Soil consists of weathered rocks and decomposed organic material from dead plants, animals, and bacteria. Soils are often found in layers, with each having a different chemical composition and texture.
              • Water, which covers the majority of the earth's surface, circulates through the crust, oceans, and atmosphere in what is known as the "water cycle." Water evaporates from the earth's surface, rises and cools as it moves to higher elevations, condenses as rain or snow, and falls to the surface where it collects in lakes, oceans, soil, and in rocks underground.
              • Water is a solvent. As it passes through the water cycle it dissolves minerals and gases and carries them to the oceans.
              • The atmosphere is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases that include water vapor. The atmosphere has different properties at different elevations.
              • Clouds, formed by the condensation of water vapor, affect weather and climate.
              • Global patterns of atmospheric movement influence local weather. Oceans have a major effect on climate, because water in the oceans holds a large amount of heat.
              • Living organisms have played many roles in the earth system, including affecting the composition of the atmosphere, producing some types of rocks, and contributing to the weathering of rocks.
              Even if all this wasn't in the National Standards - if you explain it's required of the state standards - you're still covered!! Hang in there!
               
              Donna M. Petty
              dpetty@...
              Class Page (http://home.usit.net/~dpetty/Class_Page/index.htm)
              Bahá'í Page (http://www.columbiabahai.org)
               
              "When you were born you cried and the world rejoiced.
              Live your life so that when you die the world cries
              and you rejoice".
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Monday, December 01, 2003 6:36 PM
              Subject: [EASCI] Re: Meeting students interests and needs

              Thanks for the replies.  But concerning weather, I was going to do
              exactly what you had done.  We live in tornado alley.  And boy do I
              have a lot to contribute if I did this topic.  However when I viewed
              the National Standards, it does not include Weather and Climate for
              grades 5-8 only for K-4.  If I am mistaken, I would like for someone
              to correct me on that.However it is required of us to teach it in
              the 8th grade for our state standardized tests.

              In regard to parents, I meet with parents very little in a social
              climate.  Our school can have transistory students and I don't think
              at this point I want to say why.  So I would need to probably give
              something to students on day when our work load is not so busy and
              have them work in cooperative groups to discuss and record
              information about themselves and science. 

              Also I found a web site that would print linear graphs of student
              data if anyone is interested in this as well.

              Thanks again for your replies.

              The science teacher!!



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            • bulleez
              I would chose a topic that is specifically one of the national standards. You could have the greatest lesson in the world, but if an assessor has been trained
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 1, 2003
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                I would chose a topic that is specifically one of the national
                standards. You could have the greatest lesson in the world, but
                if an assessor has been trained to look for appropriate
                standards, you might not get a passing score. My mentors last
                year steered me to this info time and time again. I passed my
                first time. good luck. Julie

                --- In EASCI@yahoogroups.com, "sciquest2000"
                <eden908@h...> wrote:
                > Thanks for the replies. But concerning weather, I was going to
                do
                > exactly what you had done. We live in tornado alley. And boy
                do I
                > have a lot to contribute if I did this topic. However when I
                viewed
                > the National Standards, it does not include Weather and
                Climate for
                > grades 5-8 only for K-4. If I am mistaken, I would like for
                someone
                > to correct me on that.However it is required of us to teach it in
                > the 8th grade for our state standardized tests.
                >
                > In regard to parents, I meet with parents very little in a social
                > climate. Our school can have transistory students and I don't
                think
                > at this point I want to say why. So I would need to probably give
                > something to students on day when our work load is not so
                busy and
                > have them work in cooperative groups to discuss and record
                > information about themselves and science.
                >
                > Also I found a web site that would print linear graphs of student
                > data if anyone is interested in this as well.
                >
                > Thanks again for your replies.
                >
                > The science teacher!!
              • sciquest2000
                Oh my gosh!!. Thanks Donna for all the...er... detail..LOL. I will read and look up the other standards...cool... Thanks for pointing me in the right
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 1, 2003
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                  Oh my gosh!!. Thanks Donna for all the...er... detail..LOL. I will
                  read and look up the other standards...cool... Thanks for pointing
                  me in the right direction.

                  The science teacher
                • Karen Cahoon
                  YES! Weather and Climate is there...Donna just showed you how to access it...Now, take that tornado alley concept and translate it into how important it is for
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 1, 2003
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                    YES! Weather and Climate is there...Donna just showed you how to access
                    it...Now, take that tornado alley concept and translate it into how
                    important it is for students to know how to use weather to stay safe and
                    interpret weather maps / forecasts. This is extremely relevant and
                    important to them as students and as adults. Weather factors and
                    patterns will always have a major influence in their lives, work or
                    play.
                    Karen
                    NBCT EASCI '03

                    >>> eden908@... 12/01/03 9:01 PM >>>
                  • v1945@aol.com
                    In a message dated 12/1/2003 6:56:17 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... I would like to have this web site. Sounds interesting!!!! NBCT 2001
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 1, 2003
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                      In a message dated 12/1/2003 6:56:17 PM Eastern Standard Time, eden908@... writes:

                      Also I found a web site that would print linear graphs of student
                      data if anyone is interested in this as well.


                      I would like to have this web site.  Sounds interesting!!!!
                      NBCT 2001
                    • sciquest2000
                      This site will only plot data for linear graphs. However it is still a great on-line excercise. My students can use this to plot their data for their science
                      Message 10 of 11 , Dec 3, 2003
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                        This site will only plot data for linear graphs. However it is still
                        a great on-line excercise. My students can use this to plot their
                        data for their science projects and get a nice looking graph.
                        The link is titled as "Create A Graph".

                        http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/graphing/line_data.asp?b=15&totallines=1

                        The Science Teacher

                        --- In EASCI@yahoogroups.com, v1945@a... wrote:
                        > In a message dated 12/1/2003 6:56:17 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                        > eden908@h... writes:
                        >
                        > > Also I found a web site that would print linear graphs of student
                        > > data if anyone is interested in this as well.
                        > >
                        >
                        > I would like to have this web site. Sounds interesting!!!!
                        > NBCT 2001
                      • v1945@aol.com
                        Thank you for the web site!!! NBCT 2001
                        Message 11 of 11 , Dec 4, 2003
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                          Thank you for the web site!!!
                          NBCT 2001
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