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Re: [EASCI] which students to pick?

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  • Jill W Saia
    Very often we overlook the average or even high-achieving child when looking for students we can help. However, if you believe that children can achieve to
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 6, 2002
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      Very often we overlook the average or even high-achieving child when
      looking for students we can help. However, if you believe that children
      can achieve to the level of our expectations (as I do), then all students
      need our attention at some point. The student who is bright but having
      trouble on a certain topic is a good student to pick; it shows that you
      recognize individual students' strengths and weaknesses.
      In my own portfolio I profiled one very high-achieving child who had
      trouble thinking "outside the box". He liked definite answers, not "maybe
      if's" And it was one of my best entries.
      Go ahead and choose the good students who are struggling in a particular
      area; you will be able to show how you helped them grasp the concepts. You
      might balance it with another student who perhaps doesn't do as well,
      because the strategies you use to help this student will be different from
      the first one.

      Jill W. Saia
      NBCT EA Science '99
    • Jill W Saia
      Very often we overlook the average or even high-achieving child when looking for students we can help. However, if you believe that children can achieve to
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 6, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Very often we overlook the average or even high-achieving child when
        looking for students we can help. However, if you believe that children
        can achieve to the level of our expectations (as I do), then all students
        need our attention at some point. The student who is bright but having
        trouble on a certain topic is a good student to pick; it shows that you
        recognize individual students' strengths and weaknesses.
        In my own portfolio I profiled one very high-achieving child who had
        trouble thinking "outside the box". He liked definite answers, not "maybe
        if's" And it was one of my best entries.
        Go ahead and choose the good students who are struggling in a particular
        area; you will be able to show how you helped them grasp the concepts. You
        might balance it with another student who perhaps doesn't do as well,
        because the strategies you use to help this student will be different from
        the first one.

        Jill W. Saia
        NBCT EA Science '99
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