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Re: [EASCI] which students to pick?

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  • mary edmunds
    Hi Kathy, The National Board wants to see specifically how you helped a student, over time, gain knowledge. They want to see how you designed, or re-designed a
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 6, 2002
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       Hi Kathy,

      The National Board wants to see specifically how you helped a student, over time, gain knowledge. They want to see how you designed, or re-designed a lesson to accomodate the individual child.They also want to see how you worked with the students to help them correct misconceptions. So, you would not use a student who does not have difficulty on assignments. It doesn't matter the level of intelligence of the child, as long as you show that you have worked specifically with the child to increase their knowledge base.

      Remember that all that you do should be directly linked to student learning and the pedagogy of the child group that you are working with. My suggestion is to take a group of six children to follow. These children should have some difficulty but with individual attention can grasp the material. Then think, how will help each of them individually?  How is each of these children unique in their abilities to grasp the information. If it is a student that usually performs well like the one you have mentioned. You could discuss how this child usually breezes through the work but had a major misconception and what you did to help this child grasp the information. Then, how did it make this child feel? What happened after the instruction? Are they doing better now. The children that had difficulty, with the change in venue, how are they doing now individually?

      Good luck,

       Mary K. Edmunds

        kathyj64068 <kathyjferrell@...> wrote:

      I too would like some advice on which student to pick to feature. 
      One I had chosen was an average but hard working student who
      had trouble with the topic.  I choose them because she is so
      typical of many of my students, and if I could help her I could help
      so many.    The other was a typically high achieving student who
      was really having trouble with this unit.
      Do we have to choose a low achieving student?



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    • Jill W Saia
      Very often we overlook the average or even high-achieving child when looking for students we can help. However, if you believe that children can achieve to
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 6, 2002
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        Very often we overlook the average or even high-achieving child when
        looking for students we can help. However, if you believe that children
        can achieve to the level of our expectations (as I do), then all students
        need our attention at some point. The student who is bright but having
        trouble on a certain topic is a good student to pick; it shows that you
        recognize individual students' strengths and weaknesses.
        In my own portfolio I profiled one very high-achieving child who had
        trouble thinking "outside the box". He liked definite answers, not "maybe
        if's" And it was one of my best entries.
        Go ahead and choose the good students who are struggling in a particular
        area; you will be able to show how you helped them grasp the concepts. You
        might balance it with another student who perhaps doesn't do as well,
        because the strategies you use to help this student will be different from
        the first one.

        Jill W. Saia
        NBCT EA Science '99
      • Jill W Saia
        Very often we overlook the average or even high-achieving child when looking for students we can help. However, if you believe that children can achieve to
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 6, 2002
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          Very often we overlook the average or even high-achieving child when
          looking for students we can help. However, if you believe that children
          can achieve to the level of our expectations (as I do), then all students
          need our attention at some point. The student who is bright but having
          trouble on a certain topic is a good student to pick; it shows that you
          recognize individual students' strengths and weaknesses.
          In my own portfolio I profiled one very high-achieving child who had
          trouble thinking "outside the box". He liked definite answers, not "maybe
          if's" And it was one of my best entries.
          Go ahead and choose the good students who are struggling in a particular
          area; you will be able to show how you helped them grasp the concepts. You
          might balance it with another student who perhaps doesn't do as well,
          because the strategies you use to help this student will be different from
          the first one.

          Jill W. Saia
          NBCT EA Science '99
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