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Bruise Juice

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  • Benetti,Sandy [Ontario]
    Hey everyone; Last week Streonwold and I visited the Pacific Mall in Markham. It is a collection of shops and restaurants specifically geared to the Asian
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 27, 2006
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      Hey everyone;
       
      Last week Streonwold and I visited the Pacific Mall in Markham.  It is a collection of shops and restaurants specifically geared to the Asian community.  Among the many shops was an apothecary where we purchased the equivalent to "bruise juice". I can't remember the name (Streonwold will) but it's supposed to promote healing of bruises and fractures via increased circulation.  I can't say that I've noticed it's effectiveness but Streonwold seems to benefit from it.
       
      So, what do people use for their bruises? Topical ointments? Home made remedies? Store bought antiphlagistienes (sp?)?
       
      Seonag
    • Kathleen Gormanshaw
      ... Usually nothing. Hoskuld has an Arnica Gel recommended by a massage therapist he ll often use. It s hard to tell if it helps or not. Eyrny
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 27, 2006
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        Benetti,Sandy [Ontario] wrote:
        > So, what do people use for their bruises? Topical ointments? Home made
        > remedies? Store bought antiphlagistienes (sp?)?

        Usually nothing. Hoskuld has an Arnica Gel recommended by a massage
        therapist he'll often use. It's hard to tell if it helps or not.

        Eyrny
      • Streonwold Wulfesbana (mka Steve Benetti)
        ... It s called Zheng Gu Shui (or dit da jow in some areas). Well respected in the martial arts community. An advertising page about the stuff says this:
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 27, 2006
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          --- In E-Chir@yahoogroups.com, "Benetti,Sandy [Ontario]"
          <sandy.benetti@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hey everyone;
          >
          > Last week Streonwold and I visited the Pacific Mall in Markham. It is a
          > collection of shops and restaurants specifically geared to the Asian
          > community. Among the many shops was an apothecary where we purchased
          > the equivalent to "bruise juice". I can't remember the name

          It's called "Zheng Gu Shui" (or "dit da jow" in some areas). Well
          respected in the martial arts community. An advertising page about
          the stuff says this:
          "Zheng Gu Shui "Rectify Bone Liquid" is a very warming liquid to
          dispel blood stasis and fluid stagnation. As the name implies, Zheng
          Gu Shui penetrates to the bone level to promote healing and stop pain.
          The topical choice for broken bones, soak the fracture immediately and
          continuously for pain, bruising, swelling and healing. Do this by
          soaking two to three cotton balls, applying to set bone, and wrap
          loosely with gauze. Leave on one hour for upper body, 1 1/2 hours for
          lower limbs. Shorten the time for children. Do this two times a day
          untill the bone is healed. Useful before or after exercise for
          soreness and to strengthen tendons.

          active ingredients: Notoginseng 25%, Tiglium 18%, Croton 15%, Angelica
          13%, Fleminigia 12%, Inula 12%, Mentha 3%, Camphora 2%,"

          In the martial arts community (particularly Kung Fu) various "jows"
          are used to strengthen and heal various parts of the body, some to
          good effect. They have one particular jow which is used on the hands
          for "Iron Palm" training. Many sifus (teachers) concoct their jows to
          ancient recipes.

          Your mileage may vary.
        • Claude Gagne
          Where can I get my hands on some of this stuff. I m in real pain here. PS Does this help with old age joints too. LOL Derfel ... From: Streonwold Wulfesbana
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 27, 2006
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            Where can I get my hands on some of this stuff. I'm in real pain here.
             
            PS Does this help with old age joints too.
             
            LOL
             
            Derfel

            ----- Original Message ----
            From: Streonwold Wulfesbana (mka Steve Benetti) <streonwold@...>
            To: E-Chir@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 10:22:56 AM
            Subject: [E-Chir] Re: Bruise Juice

            --- In E-Chir@yahoogroups. com, "Benetti,Sandy [Ontario]"
            <sandy.benetti@ ...> wrote:

            >
            > Hey everyone;
            >
            > Last week Streonwold and I visited the Pacific Mall in Markham. It is a
            > collection of shops and restaurants specifically geared to the Asian
            > community. Among the many shops was an apothecary where we purchased
            > the equivalent to "bruise juice". I can't remember the name

            It's called "Zheng Gu Shui" (or "dit da jow" in some areas). Well
            respected in the martial arts community. An advertising page about
            the stuff says this:
            "Zheng Gu Shui "Rectify Bone Liquid" is a very warming liquid to
            dispel blood stasis and fluid stagnation. As the name implies, Zheng
            Gu Shui penetrates to the bone level to promote healing and stop pain.
            The topical choice for broken bones, soak the fracture immediately and
            continuously for pain, bruising, swelling and healing. Do this by
            soaking two to three cotton balls, applying to set bone, and wrap
            loosely with gauze. Leave on one hour for upper body, 1 1/2 hours for
            lower limbs. Shorten the time for children. Do this two times a day
            untill the bone is healed. Useful before or after exercise for
            soreness and to strengthen tendons.

            active ingredients: Notoginseng 25%, Tiglium 18%, Croton 15%, Angelica
            13%, Fleminigia 12%, Inula 12%, Mentha 3%, Camphora 2%,"

            In the martial arts community (particularly Kung Fu) various "jows"
            are used to strengthen and heal various parts of the body, some to
            good effect. They have one particular jow which is used on the hands
            for "Iron Palm" training. Many sifus (teachers) concoct their jows to
            ancient recipes.

            Your mileage may vary.


          • Streonwold Wulfesbana (mka Steve Benetti)
            ... Streonwold
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 27, 2006
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              --- In E-Chir@yahoogroups.com, Derfel wrote:

              > Where can I get my hands on some of this stuff. I'm in real pain here.

              Streonwold
            • Streonwold Wulfesbana (mka Steve Benetti)
              ... Messed up that last post, sorry. I meant to say this: You can get this stuff, and many Chinese patent medicines like it, at virtually any Chinese
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 27, 2006
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                --- In E-Chir@yahoogroups.com, Derfel wrote:
                >
                > Where can I get my hands on some of this stuff. I'm in real pain here.
                >
                > PS Does this help with old age joints too.

                Messed up that last post, sorry. I meant to say this:

                You can get this stuff, and many Chinese patent medicines like it, at
                virtually any Chinese herbalist or pharmacy (visit your nearest
                Chinatown).

                You can also order it online, try:
                http://www.bltsupplies.com/saccheal.html

                If you want to try making your own, try:
                http://www.kumojiujitsu.com/orientalmedicine-recipes.htm

                >>>>WARNING MODE ON<<<<<

                SOME OF THIS STUFF IS WIERD. IT CAN ELICIT WIERD
                SENSITIVITIES/ALLERGIES, ETC. SOME OF THIS STUFF MIGHT BE TOXIC.
                I'D RATHER NOT HEAR ABOUT ONE OF MY FRIENDS SUFFERING FROM ANAPHYLAXIS
                AFTER USING SOME TOXIC JOW, SO BE CAREFUL, SENSIBLE, CAUTIOUS, AND
                LIKE THAT. BUT YOU ALREADY KNEW THAT, RIGHT?

                >>>>>WARNING MODE OFF<<<<<

                Having said that, most of the commercial jows available in Canada have
                been tested, and in many cases, reformulated for this market. The one
                I just bought is labeled "Canadian Formula". It was about $5.00 for 3
                1/2 ounces.

                Streonwold
              • TSivia
                I m fond of witch hazel , which I seem to recall was one of the major ingredients in Mistress Tamarra s bruise
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 27, 2006
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                  I'm fond of witch hazel <available at most standard big-name
                  pharmacies>, which I seem to recall was one of the major ingredients
                  in Mistress Tamarra's bruise juice, too. There are also some great
                  stick-on bandages sold at Chinese trad. medicine shops which help do
                  the same thing: aid in the reduction of swelling and colouration.

                  TSivia

                  --- In E-Chir@yahoogroups.com, "Benetti,Sandy [Ontario]"
                  <sandy.benetti@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hey everyone;
                  >
                  > Last week Streonwold and I visited the Pacific Mall in Markham.
                  It is a
                  > collection of shops and restaurants specifically geared to the
                  Asian
                  > community. Among the many shops was an apothecary where we
                  purchased
                  > the equivalent to "bruise juice". I can't remember the name
                  (Streonwold
                  > will) but it's supposed to promote healing of bruises and
                  fractures via
                  > increased circulation. I can't say that I've noticed it's
                  effectiveness
                  > but Streonwold seems to benefit from it.
                  >
                  > So, what do people use for their bruises? Topical ointments? Home
                  made
                  > remedies? Store bought antiphlagistienes (sp?)?
                  >
                  > Seonag
                  >
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