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Re: [E-Chir] Scenario 2; part 1

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  • Keith Crawley
    Yup its happened to me as well but in this case I am pretty sure they will want help but asking permission is almost always a given when approaching a victim.
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 11, 2009
      Yup its happened to me as well but in this case I am pretty sure they will want help but asking permission is almost always a given when approaching a victim. Be it a direct question or a simple "hey what happened here? I have my first aid kit may I take a look?"  
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, February 11, 2009 12:38 PM
      Subject: Re: [E-Chir] Scenario 2; part 1

      I agree- I've been called over by someone only to be told by the injured person that I'm not needed.
      Medb

      --- On Wed, 2/11/09, sheldon@pipcom. com <sheldon@pipcom. com> wrote:

      From: sheldon@pipcom. com <sheldon@pipcom. com>
      Subject: Re: [E-Chir] Scenario 2; part 1
      To: E-Chir@yahoogroups. com
      Date: Wednesday, February 11, 2009, 5:25 PM

      On the second #1 question, I'd also add get Consent. Just because your
      called does not mean you can take over. Ask before doing anything else.

      Russ / Dafydd

    • b1laxson
      ... head to the yelling and are met a few steps from your table by a gentlemen who states, They ve cut themself. You have to hurry. It s really bad. There s
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 11, 2009
        Brian Goodheart's responses:

        > Suddenly you hear someone yelling for a chirugeon. Getting up you
        head to the yelling and are met a few steps from your table by a
        gentlemen who states, "They've cut themself. You have to hurry. It's
        really bad. There's blood everywhere!"
        >  
        > 1. What do you do first?

        Get up carefully from what I was doing.
        Make sure my mini-kit is on my belt.

        >  
        > 2. What are you thinking?

        Mentally reviewing contents of my mini-kit.

        Wondering who is the Chirurgeon in Charge and the Autocrat.

        Also who has a cell phone in case it is needed.

        Also... are there chirurgeons with more medical qualifications than
        myself? Xristina our Kingdom Chirurgeon for instance (and its not
        kissing ass, its looking for superior skills for the benefit of the
        patient) or Baroness Margaret a nurse.

        >  
        > 3. How do you approach this incident?
        >  

        First look for signs of ongoing risk to myself or others.
        Crowd control and cessation of near by activities may be called for.


        > When you arrive at the classroom you see about 10 people all
        crowded around someone sitting on a chair. When you finally make
        your way through to the casualty you see a middle-aged gentleman
        (approx. 40 yrs old) who is currently holding his forearm and hand
        close to his chest with what appears to be a white veil wrapped
        around his arm. You do notice blood on the veil. You notice that
        there is blood on the floor at his feet as well as some on his
        tunic. 
        >  
        > 1. What is your first assessment? What are you looking for?

        Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Is their brain getting oxygen via
        blood.
        Is the patient talking? That's a good sign.


        >  
        > 2. What is your second assessment? What are you looking for?

        Is there an imbeded object?
        Is there risk of new injuries from a stray object?


        >  
        > 3. How do you control this scene?
        >

        First instruct people to give him room to breath.

        Ask the patient what happened.

        Ask someone to look for the Autocrat and something to clean the
        floor with.

        Keep an eye on the bleeding for the volume of blood loss
        and "spurting" which would indicate an artery is cut.

        Put on the gloves from my mini-kit.

        Recommend to the patient that he goto emergency.


        Question: Should we be calling 911 to ready profesional transport
        rather (ambulance)?
      • b1laxson
        The patient talking to you largely completes the critical assessment of ABC. I would add take a moment before departing on their no to see if they are likely
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 11, 2009
          The patient talking to you largely completes the critical assessment
          of ABC.

          I would add take a moment before departing on their "no" to see if
          they are likely to pass out. Once they pass out... uh... the
          assessment changes to potentially life threatening and consent is
          assumed.

          Brian the Green


          --- In E-Chir@yahoogroups.com, Jackie Wyatt <jkwyatt@...> wrote:
          >
          > I agree- I've been called over by someone only to be told by the
          injured person that I'm not needed.
          > Medb
          >
          > --- On Wed, 2/11/09, sheldon@... <sheldon@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: sheldon@... <sheldon@...>
          > Subject: Re: [E-Chir] Scenario 2; part 1
          > To: E-Chir@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Wednesday, February 11, 2009, 5:25 PM
          >
          >
          > On the second #1 question, I'd also add get Consent. Just because
          your
          > called does not mean you can take over. Ask before doing anything
          else.
          >
          > Russ / Dafydd
          >
        • shannon carswell
          ... head to the yelling and are met a few steps from your table by a gentlemen who states, They ve cut themself. You have to hurry. It s really bad. There s
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 13, 2009

            > Suddenly you hear someone yelling for a chirugeon. Getting up you
            head to the yelling and are met a few steps from your table by a
            gentlemen who states, "They've cut themself. You have to hurry. It's
            really bad. There's blood everywhere!"
             
             1. What do you do first?
                Find my First aid kit and if I am with friends maybe ask a non involved third party to come with in case I need a calm person to do gopher duty (call 911, get the autocrat, etc etc).
             
            2. What are you thinking?
             
                Mostly trying to remember what ninka taught me in first aid :P.  (kidding) Seriously, mostly about how to keep everyone calm, remembering treatment for shock and about what bandages I have available.
             
            3. How do you approach this incident?
             
             Again calmly, checking for hazards, number of people, potential causes, and first impressions of injured person (are they laying down, up and talking?)
             
             When you arrive at the classroom you see about 10 people all
            crowded around someone sitting on a chair. When you finally make
            your way through to the casualty you see a middle-aged gentleman
            (approx. 40 yrs old) who is currently holding his forearm and hand
            close to his chest with what appears to be a white veil wrapped
            around his arm. You do notice blood on the veil. You notice that
            there is blood on the floor at his feet as well as some on his
            tunic. 

            1. What is your first assessment? What are you looking for?
             
             First ABC, He is concious so A, and B are covered and as to C well his heart is definetly beating... but the wound is obviously a comprimise for circulation.  I would check amount of blood , if there is a puddle, I am having my gopher call 911, better safe than sorry.  If there are a couple splashes, better to get a real bandage on and have soemone drive him if he needs stiches.

            2. What is your second assessment? What are you looking for? 
             
            Signs of shcok, level of awareness, I would introduce my self ask his name, ask if I could help, ask how this happened and ensure that the hazardous object was somewhere safe.  I then with permission ask to see the wound.

            3. How do you control this scene?
             
              By remaining calm myself.  By asking talking to the person injured person directly. (Assuming he is not in shock) by showing confidence.  By assigning people to tasks if they get to panicky. 
             
            okay there's my two cents (she adds meekly)

             
            anyone lived in a pretty how town with up so floating many bells down...


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