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Gallon+ water in fuselage

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  • Bob
    Hi, This evening, two co-workers and I moved the plane from the trailer into the work area only to discover several gallons of water in the fuselage. We tipped
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 2, 2011
      Hi,

      This evening, two co-workers and I moved the plane from the trailer into the work area only to discover several gallons of water in the fuselage. We tipped it on the side and got all but a quart or so out. I'll have to get the rest on Saturday. But now I'm wondering,"Where are the water drains?

      I'll probably invert the fuselage to get the last of the water out and then look at adding a water drain tubes behind and in front of the fuel tank. But I'm thinking this water collection could be unpleasant if on a trip and the plane had to be tied down through a steady rain. A couple of gallons sloshing about the fuselage, especially the aft, could be . . . an unpleasant surprise.

      All in all, the plane survived the trip without much damage. Some paint flakes at different places but nothing indicating anything but a surface problem. I'll 'tap test' now that it is in a work area. My initial testing suggested it is OK.

      The discolorations on the canard appear to be harmless and just the variable coloration epoxy can take. The surface had been 'painted' with a light coat so when the epoxy was applied to build up the rudder mounts, the coloration showed up.

      If I remember correctly, there is a mod that adds an access cover to the area on top of the fuselage between the firewall and instruments. This makes a lot of sense, especially for annual inspections. But I will also look closer at the canopy hinge mount that may accomplish the same effect.

      Thanks,
      Bob Wilson
    • Darrell
      Hi Bob, Glad to hear that your plane survived the trip ok. As for the drains, my plane has a couple of holes in the aft section...no tubes, just holes. I m
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 2, 2011
        Hi Bob,
        Glad to hear that your plane survived the trip ok.
        As for the drains, my plane has a couple of holes in the aft section...no tubes, just holes. I'm guessing that they're 1/4". That should be easy to fix...just drill from underneath, and apply some resin around the hole to seal it.
        My plane has the cover you're talking about. I don't know how I could do without it. I'm not sure of it's dimensions, but it's about the size of a sheet of printer paper. Four machine screws hold it in place.
        I need that access especially for annual condition inspections. I also put our luggage in there for trips, but, as you know, there's not much room in a DF, so the luggage amounts to an overnight bag.
        Darrell
        MK1 in TZV


        --- In Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com, "Bob" <bwilson4web@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > This evening, two co-workers and I moved the plane from the trailer into the work area only to discover several gallons of water in the fuselage. We tipped it on the side and got all but a quart or so out. I'll have to get the rest on Saturday. But now I'm wondering,"Where are the water drains?
        >
        > I'll probably invert the fuselage to get the last of the water out and then look at adding a water drain tubes behind and in front of the fuel tank. But I'm thinking this water collection could be unpleasant if on a trip and the plane had to be tied down through a steady rain. A couple of gallons sloshing about the fuselage, especially the aft, could be . . . an unpleasant surprise.
        >
        > All in all, the plane survived the trip without much damage. Some paint flakes at different places but nothing indicating anything but a surface problem. I'll 'tap test' now that it is in a work area. My initial testing suggested it is OK.
        >
        > The discolorations on the canard appear to be harmless and just the variable coloration epoxy can take. The surface had been 'painted' with a light coat so when the epoxy was applied to build up the rudder mounts, the coloration showed up.
        >
        > If I remember correctly, there is a mod that adds an access cover to the area on top of the fuselage between the firewall and instruments. This makes a lot of sense, especially for annual inspections. But I will also look closer at the canopy hinge mount that may accomplish the same effect.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Bob Wilson
        >
      • Bob
        Thanks! ... I ll do it later. This morning, I laid two dry towels and after 30 minutes, I had two soaking towels and a dry fuselage. I want to do the drains
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 4, 2011
          Thanks!

          --- In Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com, "Darrell" <d_doerhoff@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Bob,
          > Glad to hear that your plane survived the trip ok.
          > As for the drains, my plane has a couple of holes in the aft section...no tubes, just holes. I'm guessing that they're 1/4". That should be easy to fix...just drill from underneath, and apply some resin around the hole to seal it.

          I'll do it later. This morning, I laid two dry towels and after 30 minutes, I had two soaking towels and a dry fuselage. I want to do the drains 'right' and for now, I'll just add that to my 'to do' list.

          I need to go back and check the area between the canard drag bulkhead and the fuel tank but it felt dry when I tested it later this morning. I'll double check it later tonight . . . with another dry towel.

          > My plane has the cover you're talking about. I don't know how I could do without it. I'm not sure of it's dimensions, but it's about the size of a sheet of printer paper. Four machine screws hold it in place.
          > I need that access especially for annual condition inspections. I also put our luggage in there for trips, but, as you know, there's not much room in a DF, so the luggage amounts to an overnight bag.

          That makes sense as it also allows access to the rudder pedals, brake cylinders and would make attaching the canard lift brackets less awkward.

          Bob Wilson
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