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AirVenture 2009 Trip Report - LONG

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  • Letempt, Jeffrey A CIV USA
    Had a very eventful trip to AirVenture 2009, but I am back in AL with my Dragonfly all in one piece...so how bad could it have been? I left LA (Lower Alabama)
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 5, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Had a very eventful trip to AirVenture 2009, but I am back in AL with my Dragonfly all in one piece...so how bad could it have been?



      I left LA (Lower Alabama) on Tuesday morning. I knew before I left that I was going to have to detour north towards Chattanooga, TN before I turned west for my first intended fuel stop of Lawrenceburg, TN (2M2). I was flying at about 4,500' over few clouds below me that turned into scattered, then broken, then overcast. I was listening to AWOS's at various airports as the weather got worse....KMDQ: 1 ¾ mile visibility, light rain, 800 broken...not great, but I was confident I could make it in there if I needed to. I was about 40 miles out from 2M2 and the weather was forecast to be better there. As I approached KGZS and listening to their AWOS, I was not so confident that I could make it into 2M2. As I approached 2M2 I think the AWOS said it was something like ¼ mile visibility and 600' ceiling with rain. At this point I was in and out of moderate rain and was down to about 2 hours of fuel onboard. I wasn't too concerned because I knew I should be able to make it back into KMDQ without too much trouble so I turned back to the east. As I got closer to KMDQ the AWOS was saying ¼ visibility, 600' ceiling, heavy rain. I could not see down through the clouds at this point. I saw another airport on my GPS (Hazel Green - M38) so I selected the nearest function and found a decent gap in the clouds so I descended towards the airport. I did not know anything about this airport except for what was on the sectional, but I was ready to be on the ground. I circled where the airport was supposed to be, but could not find it at first. Another pass and I found it. I got myself set-up for approach the best I could, but man did the runway look small. They had a small cut in the trees with power lines off to the west and the runway had a displaced threshold of 550'. I was a little high and a little fast, but with the moderate rain I was concerned about getting 5' off the runway and going into pitch buck. I installed VG's about 3 months ago, but had not flown the plane in the rain yet. Bugs did not seem to effect the performance as much as they used, so I was hopeful they would help with the rain also. At about 10' off the runway it was evident that I was not going to make it on the runway so I added power and did a go-around with a small pattern so I did not lose sight of the runway. I touched down a couple hundred feet past the displaced threshold, had one little bounce and when I touched down again I made sure I planted the gear with a healthy application of forward stick and moderate braking...then I started hydroplaning because of the big puddles on the 40' x 2670' runway (that I now know was listed in poor condition and with the displaced threshold it was just 2120' long). I was confident that I was going to end up in the grass, but I kept it right down the centerline and had probably 500' of runway remaining once I stopped. It is ALWAYS better to be on the ground wishing you were flying rather than in the air wishing you were on the ground. I taxied up to the small ramp with a big above ground fuel tank and a Ford pickup met me there. Actually he drove out to the runway as I was making my first approach. A very nice man named Robert Luther stepped out into the rain and asked me if he could be of any assistance. I asked him if he had fuel and he said he had plenty. We took care of refueling the plane and he told me that they did not take credit cards, but he would trust me to send him the money if I did not have enough cash. Come to find out it is not even a public use airport (although it says it is on AirNav). The State of AL will apparently not license public use airports with runways less than 60' wide and they were forced to become a private use airport a few years ago. There are about 20 hangars and homes on the airport.



      Bob showed me around his hangar as we waited and hoped the weather would improve. Bob has a Cessna 210 that he has owned for 40 years, he joked that he has owned his plane longer than he has been married to his wife (of only 38 years). He had a Stinson 108-3 that he was restoring and was also updating the instrument panel on the 210. We chatted for a few hours when he looked over my shoulder out the window from his hangar office and commented that Mark was back. I did not know who he was talking about at first, but once we opened the hangar door and I saw a KR-2 and knew it was Mark Langford. I have emailed back a forth with Mark a few times over the last several years and saw him at the Evergreen, AL fly-in last year. Mark was just getting back from OSH after detouring for weather and landing at another airport to wait for a while. Mark immediately offered me a place to spend the night even though we really didn't know each other except we had a mutual interest in flying. Another call to the FSS confirmed the chances of making it any further Tuesday was basically out of the question. Bob let me park my Dragonfly in his hangar between the 210 and Stinson. Mark took me home, fed me, and gave me a nice dry place to spend the night. His wife Jean took me back out to the airport on Wednesday morning where Bob was waiting for me with open arms. The weather was still too bad to depart, so Bob showed me around the airport and we visited with several people. Finally at about 1100 the weather was good enough to go and off I went for my next planned fuel stop of Pinckneyville, IL (PJY) to have lunch with my mom and dad who are from Evansville, IL. Both KSAR and K02 (the 2 closest airports to Evansville) were closed for runway repairs.



      The weather was better than forecast, it was a big relief to be flying in nice weather. Everything was good until I got about 15 miles south of Carbondale, IL when the ceilings started coming down a little (to maybe 1800'). I contacted the tower to transition through their airspace and about 10 miles from PJY it started raining on me again. Fortunately it was only light rain and it only lasted about 2 minutes. I made a nice approach and landing at PJY and my mom and dad were there to meet me. There was a Bonanza at the fuel pump and a Lancair IV that had just finished fueling and was getting ready to departure. The Bonanza was coming from OSH heading to somewhere in Arkansas so he was interested in the weather to the south and I was interested in what he saw to the north. As we drove into town for lunch, eating lunch, and heading back to the airport it was raining off and on. A call to the FSS and my wife both told me this was very small cell and once it cleared out I would be fine the rest of the way. I waited for about 30 more minutes before I took off and the next leg of my trip to Rochelle, IL (RPJ) was uneventful!!! I was in a hurry because OSH closes at 2000 and I did not want to have to tie down the airplane and set-up my tent in the dark.



      As I approached Ripon I could not receive ATIS (actually could not even receive ATIS overhead Fisk). Got set-up in the corridor at 1800' and 90 knots and got behind a Cessna. Tuned up approach and as I approached Fisk found that the airport was not accepting arrivals and that people were holding at Green Lake and Rush Lake. Me and the Cessna (along with probably 25 other aircraft) entered holding at Rush Lake. As we were just about to turn back towards Fisk we heard they were opening the airport for arrivals. It was very orderly as we merged with traffic inbound between Ripon and Fisk. I was directed to proceed inbound on Fisk Avenue for a 36 arrival. Both of my previous arrivals were to 27, so this was something new. I have never heard an air traffic controller talking so fast for so long without a break. He was landing at least 3 aircraft at a time on 36L and 2-3 on 36R (the taxiway), but everything worked out just fine. Taxied to the homebuilt camping area without any problems and was parked on row 314. Got the plane tied down and set-up camp.



      The next morning I woke up to, you guessed it, rain. It rained until about 1000 and then off and on for the rest of the day, but I just put my poncho on and had fun anyway. The airshow did happen, but was modified due to the weather. It was nice and cool at Oshkosh this year, the highs were in the low-mid 70's and the lows were in the low 50's. Next time I will make sure and look at the weather forecast at Oshkosh a little closer when packing my suite case....I did not have anything except for shorts and short sleeve shirts. I met several Dragonfly guys, I had nice chats with Ed Schneider, Charlie Hannan, Steve Krueger, and Rich Goldman. Saw Bruce Crain's Tri-Q200, but did not see Bruce. Had a chance to talk with Doug Humble (Q-Talk newsletter editor) over in the vintage aircraft area. Charlie Hannan works right on KOSH so he loaned me a warm shirt and took me into town to buy something. Friday was a beautiful day.



      Getting out of KOSH at about 0730 on Saturday was straight forward. Departed on 18R and then once again flew in some light rain and very stiff winds back to Rochelle. Very nice guy at the FBO helped me with weather and coming up with a good route. I decided I would stop at Owensboro, KY (OWB) which I completed without any problems. After I got the plane fueled up at OWB I was met by a nice old guy who was building an RV. Then a couple more guys came up and they ended up taking me over to their flying club building where I used the restroom, filled my water bottle, and got some more help with flight planning and the use of a computer. There were some thunderstorms coming across AL so I ended up selecting Rome, GA (KRMG) for my last fuel stop before my home field of Headland, AL (0J6). This leg of the flight also went smooth, but the winds were strong at RMG due to some thunderstorms in the vicinity. Got gas and checked weather. Had to dodge a couple thunderstorms near Auburn, AL, but it was actually an easy flight (compared to most of the rest of my trip). Landed back at 0J6 after logging 8.7 hours on the tach on Saturday.



      Totals for my trip were:

      69.91 gallons of 100LL used

      18.2 total tach hours

      3.841 GPH average fuel economy

      28.7 MPG average

      2006 Statute Miles

      (Fuel used, average fuel economy, and MPG are estimates based on the first ~16.5 hours of the trip since they are currently out of fuel at my home field and I could not top off at the end of my trip).



      Jeff

      Dragonfly MK-IIH - N41GK



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Guy Bowen
      Does your bird still have a Limbach?
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 5, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Does your bird still have a Limbach?

        --- In Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com, "Letempt, Jeffrey A CIV USA" <jeffrey.letempt@...> wrote:
        >
        > Had a very eventful trip to AirVenture 2009, but I am back in AL with my Dragonfly all in one piece...so how bad could it have been?
        >
        >
        >
        > I left LA (Lower Alabama) on Tuesday morning. I knew before I left that I was going to have to detour north towards Chattanooga, TN before I turned west for my first intended fuel stop of Lawrenceburg, TN (2M2). I was flying at about 4,500' over few clouds below me that turned into scattered, then broken, then overcast. I was listening to AWOS's at various airports as the weather got worse....KMDQ: 1 ¾ mile visibility, light rain, 800 broken...not great, but I was confident I could make it in there if I needed to. I was about 40 miles out from 2M2 and the weather was forecast to be better there. As I approached KGZS and listening to their AWOS, I was not so confident that I could make it into 2M2. As I approached 2M2 I think the AWOS said it was something like ¼ mile visibility and 600' ceiling with rain. At this point I was in and out of moderate rain and was down to about 2 hours of fuel onboard. I wasn't too concerned because I knew I should be able to make it back into KMDQ without too much trouble so I turned back to the east. As I got closer to KMDQ the AWOS was saying ¼ visibility, 600' ceiling, heavy rain. I could not see down through the clouds at this point. I saw another airport on my GPS (Hazel Green - M38) so I selected the nearest function and found a decent gap in the clouds so I descended towards the airport. I did not know anything about this airport except for what was on the sectional, but I was ready to be on the ground. I circled where the airport was supposed to be, but could not find it at first. Another pass and I found it. I got myself set-up for approach the best I could, but man did the runway look small. They had a small cut in the trees with power lines off to the west and the runway had a displaced threshold of 550'. I was a little high and a little fast, but with the moderate rain I was concerned about getting 5' off the runway and going into pitch buck. I installed VG's about 3 months ago, but had not flown the plane in the rain yet. Bugs did not seem to effect the performance as much as they used, so I was hopeful they would help with the rain also. At about 10' off the runway it was evident that I was not going to make it on the runway so I added power and did a go-around with a small pattern so I did not lose sight of the runway. I touched down a couple hundred feet past the displaced threshold, had one little bounce and when I touched down again I made sure I planted the gear with a healthy application of forward stick and moderate braking...then I started hydroplaning because of the big puddles on the 40' x 2670' runway (that I now know was listed in poor condition and with the displaced threshold it was just 2120' long). I was confident that I was going to end up in the grass, but I kept it right down the centerline and had probably 500' of runway remaining once I stopped. It is ALWAYS better to be on the ground wishing you were flying rather than in the air wishing you were on the ground. I taxied up to the small ramp with a big above ground fuel tank and a Ford pickup met me there. Actually he drove out to the runway as I was making my first approach. A very nice man named Robert Luther stepped out into the rain and asked me if he could be of any assistance. I asked him if he had fuel and he said he had plenty. We took care of refueling the plane and he told me that they did not take credit cards, but he would trust me to send him the money if I did not have enough cash. Come to find out it is not even a public use airport (although it says it is on AirNav). The State of AL will apparently not license public use airports with runways less than 60' wide and they were forced to become a private use airport a few years ago. There are about 20 hangars and homes on the airport.
        >
        >
        >
        > Bob showed me around his hangar as we waited and hoped the weather would improve. Bob has a Cessna 210 that he has owned for 40 years, he joked that he has owned his plane longer than he has been married to his wife (of only 38 years). He had a Stinson 108-3 that he was restoring and was also updating the instrument panel on the 210. We chatted for a few hours when he looked over my shoulder out the window from his hangar office and commented that Mark was back. I did not know who he was talking about at first, but once we opened the hangar door and I saw a KR-2 and knew it was Mark Langford. I have emailed back a forth with Mark a few times over the last several years and saw him at the Evergreen, AL fly-in last year. Mark was just getting back from OSH after detouring for weather and landing at another airport to wait for a while. Mark immediately offered me a place to spend the night even though we really didn't know each other except we had a mutual interest in flying. Another call to the FSS confirmed the chances of making it any further Tuesday was basically out of the question. Bob let me park my Dragonfly in his hangar between the 210 and Stinson. Mark took me home, fed me, and gave me a nice dry place to spend the night. His wife Jean took me back out to the airport on Wednesday morning where Bob was waiting for me with open arms. The weather was still too bad to depart, so Bob showed me around the airport and we visited with several people. Finally at about 1100 the weather was good enough to go and off I went for my next planned fuel stop of Pinckneyville, IL (PJY) to have lunch with my mom and dad who are from Evansville, IL. Both KSAR and K02 (the 2 closest airports to Evansville) were closed for runway repairs.
        >
        >
        >
        > The weather was better than forecast, it was a big relief to be flying in nice weather. Everything was good until I got about 15 miles south of Carbondale, IL when the ceilings started coming down a little (to maybe 1800'). I contacted the tower to transition through their airspace and about 10 miles from PJY it started raining on me again. Fortunately it was only light rain and it only lasted about 2 minutes. I made a nice approach and landing at PJY and my mom and dad were there to meet me. There was a Bonanza at the fuel pump and a Lancair IV that had just finished fueling and was getting ready to departure. The Bonanza was coming from OSH heading to somewhere in Arkansas so he was interested in the weather to the south and I was interested in what he saw to the north. As we drove into town for lunch, eating lunch, and heading back to the airport it was raining off and on. A call to the FSS and my wife both told me this was very small cell and once it cleared out I would be fine the rest of the way. I waited for about 30 more minutes before I took off and the next leg of my trip to Rochelle, IL (RPJ) was uneventful!!! I was in a hurry because OSH closes at 2000 and I did not want to have to tie down the airplane and set-up my tent in the dark.
        >
        >
        >
        > As I approached Ripon I could not receive ATIS (actually could not even receive ATIS overhead Fisk). Got set-up in the corridor at 1800' and 90 knots and got behind a Cessna. Tuned up approach and as I approached Fisk found that the airport was not accepting arrivals and that people were holding at Green Lake and Rush Lake. Me and the Cessna (along with probably 25 other aircraft) entered holding at Rush Lake. As we were just about to turn back towards Fisk we heard they were opening the airport for arrivals. It was very orderly as we merged with traffic inbound between Ripon and Fisk. I was directed to proceed inbound on Fisk Avenue for a 36 arrival. Both of my previous arrivals were to 27, so this was something new. I have never heard an air traffic controller talking so fast for so long without a break. He was landing at least 3 aircraft at a time on 36L and 2-3 on 36R (the taxiway), but everything worked out just fine. Taxied to the homebuilt camping area without any problems and was parked on row 314. Got the plane tied down and set-up camp.
        >
        >
        >
        > The next morning I woke up to, you guessed it, rain. It rained until about 1000 and then off and on for the rest of the day, but I just put my poncho on and had fun anyway. The airshow did happen, but was modified due to the weather. It was nice and cool at Oshkosh this year, the highs were in the low-mid 70's and the lows were in the low 50's. Next time I will make sure and look at the weather forecast at Oshkosh a little closer when packing my suite case....I did not have anything except for shorts and short sleeve shirts. I met several Dragonfly guys, I had nice chats with Ed Schneider, Charlie Hannan, Steve Krueger, and Rich Goldman. Saw Bruce Crain's Tri-Q200, but did not see Bruce. Had a chance to talk with Doug Humble (Q-Talk newsletter editor) over in the vintage aircraft area. Charlie Hannan works right on KOSH so he loaned me a warm shirt and took me into town to buy something. Friday was a beautiful day.
        >
        >
        >
        > Getting out of KOSH at about 0730 on Saturday was straight forward. Departed on 18R and then once again flew in some light rain and very stiff winds back to Rochelle. Very nice guy at the FBO helped me with weather and coming up with a good route. I decided I would stop at Owensboro, KY (OWB) which I completed without any problems. After I got the plane fueled up at OWB I was met by a nice old guy who was building an RV. Then a couple more guys came up and they ended up taking me over to their flying club building where I used the restroom, filled my water bottle, and got some more help with flight planning and the use of a computer. There were some thunderstorms coming across AL so I ended up selecting Rome, GA (KRMG) for my last fuel stop before my home field of Headland, AL (0J6). This leg of the flight also went smooth, but the winds were strong at RMG due to some thunderstorms in the vicinity. Got gas and checked weather. Had to dodge a couple thunderstorms near Auburn, AL, but it was actually an easy flight (compared to most of the rest of my trip). Landed back at 0J6 after logging 8.7 hours on the tach on Saturday.
        >
        >
        >
        > Totals for my trip were:
        >
        > 69.91 gallons of 100LL used
        >
        > 18.2 total tach hours
        >
        > 3.841 GPH average fuel economy
        >
        > 28.7 MPG average
        >
        > 2006 Statute Miles
        >
        > (Fuel used, average fuel economy, and MPG are estimates based on the first ~16.5 hours of the trip since they are currently out of fuel at my home field and I could not top off at the end of my trip).
        >
        >
        >
        > Jeff
        >
        > Dragonfly MK-IIH - N41GK
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Letempt, Jeffrey A CIV USA
        Yes Sent from BlackBerry device. Jeffrey A. LeTempt Aviation Center Logistics Command (ACLC) Safety Manager 1116 Dilly Branch Road Fort Rucker, AL 36362 Phone
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 5, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Yes

          Sent from BlackBerry device.

          Jeffrey A. LeTempt
          Aviation Center Logistics Command (ACLC)
          Safety Manager
          1116 Dilly Branch Road
          Fort Rucker, AL 36362
          Phone (334) 255-3671 (DSN 558)
          Email jeffrey.letempt@...

          ________________________________

          From: Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com <Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com>
          To: Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com <Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wed Aug 05 17:31:31 2009
          Subject: [Dragonflylist] Re: AirVenture 2009 Trip Report - LONG




          Does your bird still have a Limbach?

          --- In Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com <blockedmailto:Dragonflylist%40yahoogroups.com> , "Letempt, Jeffrey A CIV USA" <jeffrey.letempt@...> wrote:
          >
          > Had a very eventful trip to AirVenture 2009, but I am back in AL with my Dragonfly all in one piece...so how bad could it have been?
          >
          >
          >
          > I left LA (Lower Alabama) on Tuesday morning. I knew before I left that I was going to have to detour north towards Chattanooga, TN before I turned west for my first intended fuel stop of Lawrenceburg, TN (2M2). I was flying at about 4,500' over few clouds below me that turned into scattered, then broken, then overcast. I was listening to AWOS's at various airports as the weather got worse....KMDQ: 1 ¾ mile visibility, light rain, 800 broken...not great, but I was confident I could make it in there if I needed to. I was about 40 miles out from 2M2 and the weather was forecast to be better there. As I approached KGZS and listening to their AWOS, I was not so confident that I could make it into 2M2. As I approached 2M2 I think the AWOS said it was something like ¼ mile visibility and 600' ceiling with rain. At this point I was in and out of moderate rain and was down to about 2 hours of fuel onboard. I wasn't too concerned because I knew I should be able to make it back into KMDQ without too much trouble so I turned back to the east. As I got closer to KMDQ the AWOS was saying ¼ visibility, 600' ceiling, heavy rain. I could not see down through the clouds at this point. I saw another airport on my GPS (Hazel Green - M38) so I selected the nearest function and found a decent gap in the clouds so I descended towards the airport. I did not know anything about this airport except for what was on the sectional, but I was ready to be on the ground. I circled where the airport was supposed to be, but could not find it at first. Another pass and I found it. I got myself set-up for approach the best I could, but man did the runway look small. They had a small cut in the trees with power lines off to the west and the runway had a displaced threshold of 550'. I was a little high and a little fast, but with the moderate rain I was concerned about getting 5' off the runway and going into pitch buck. I installed VG's about 3 months ago, but had not flown the plane in the rain yet. Bugs did not seem to effect the performance as much as they used, so I was hopeful they would help with the rain also. At about 10' off the runway it was evident that I was not going to make it on the runway so I added power and did a go-around with a small pattern so I did not lose sight of the runway. I touched down a couple hundred feet past the displaced threshold, had one little bounce and when I touched down again I made sure I planted the gear with a healthy application of forward stick and moderate braking...then I started hydroplaning because of the big puddles on the 40' x 2670' runway (that I now know was listed in poor condition and with the displaced threshold it was just 2120' long). I was confident that I was going to end up in the grass, but I kept it right down the centerline and had probably 500' of runway remaining once I stopped. It is ALWAYS better to be on the ground wishing you were flying rather than in the air wishing you were on the ground. I taxied up to the small ramp with a big above ground fuel tank and a Ford pickup met me there. Actually he drove out to the runway as I was making my first approach. A very nice man named Robert Luther stepped out into the rain and asked me if he could be of any assistance. I asked him if he had fuel and he said he had plenty. We took care of refueling the plane and he told me that they did not take credit cards, but he would trust me to send him the money if I did not have enough cash. Come to find out it is not even a public use airport (although it says it is on AirNav). The State of AL will apparently not license public use airports with runways less than 60' wide and they were forced to become a private use airport a few years ago. There are about 20 hangars and homes on the airport.
          >
          >
          >
          > Bob showed me around his hangar as we waited and hoped the weather would improve. Bob has a Cessna 210 that he has owned for 40 years, he joked that he has owned his plane longer than he has been married to his wife (of only 38 years). He had a Stinson 108-3 that he was restoring and was also updating the instrument panel on the 210. We chatted for a few hours when he looked over my shoulder out the window from his hangar office and commented that Mark was back. I did not know who he was talking about at first, but once we opened the hangar door and I saw a KR-2 and knew it was Mark Langford. I have emailed back a forth with Mark a few times over the last several years and saw him at the Evergreen, AL fly-in last year. Mark was just getting back from OSH after detouring for weather and landing at another airport to wait for a while. Mark immediately offered me a place to spend the night even though we really didn't know each other except we had a mutual interest in flying. Another call to the FSS confirmed the chances of making it any further Tuesday was basically out of the question. Bob let me park my Dragonfly in his hangar between the 210 and Stinson. Mark took me home, fed me, and gave me a nice dry place to spend the night. His wife Jean took me back out to the airport on Wednesday morning where Bob was waiting for me with open arms. The weather was still too bad to depart, so Bob showed me around the airport and we visited with several people. Finally at about 1100 the weather was good enough to go and off I went for my next planned fuel stop of Pinckneyville, IL (PJY) to have lunch with my mom and dad who are from Evansville, IL. Both KSAR and K02 (the 2 closest airports to Evansville) were closed for runway repairs.
          >
          >
          >
          > The weather was better than forecast, it was a big relief to be flying in nice weather. Everything was good until I got about 15 miles south of Carbondale, IL when the ceilings started coming down a little (to maybe 1800'). I contacted the tower to transition through their airspace and about 10 miles from PJY it started raining on me again. Fortunately it was only light rain and it only lasted about 2 minutes. I made a nice approach and landing at PJY and my mom and dad were there to meet me. There was a Bonanza at the fuel pump and a Lancair IV that had just finished fueling and was getting ready to departure. The Bonanza was coming from OSH heading to somewhere in Arkansas so he was interested in the weather to the south and I was interested in what he saw to the north. As we drove into town for lunch, eating lunch, and heading back to the airport it was raining off and on. A call to the FSS and my wife both told me this was very small cell and once it cleared out I would be fine the rest of the way. I waited for about 30 more minutes before I took off and the next leg of my trip to Rochelle, IL (RPJ) was uneventful!!! I was in a hurry because OSH closes at 2000 and I did not want to have to tie down the airplane and set-up my tent in the dark.
          >
          >
          >
          > As I approached Ripon I could not receive ATIS (actually could not even receive ATIS overhead Fisk). Got set-up in the corridor at 1800' and 90 knots and got behind a Cessna. Tuned up approach and as I approached Fisk found that the airport was not accepting arrivals and that people were holding at Green Lake and Rush Lake. Me and the Cessna (along with probably 25 other aircraft) entered holding at Rush Lake. As we were just about to turn back towards Fisk we heard they were opening the airport for arrivals. It was very orderly as we merged with traffic inbound between Ripon and Fisk. I was directed to proceed inbound on Fisk Avenue for a 36 arrival. Both of my previous arrivals were to 27, so this was something new. I have never heard an air traffic controller talking so fast for so long without a break. He was landing at least 3 aircraft at a time on 36L and 2-3 on 36R (the taxiway), but everything worked out just fine. Taxied to the homebuilt camping area without any problems and was parked on row 314. Got the plane tied down and set-up camp.
          >
          >
          >
          > The next morning I woke up to, you guessed it, rain. It rained until about 1000 and then off and on for the rest of the day, but I just put my poncho on and had fun anyway. The airshow did happen, but was modified due to the weather. It was nice and cool at Oshkosh this year, the highs were in the low-mid 70's and the lows were in the low 50's. Next time I will make sure and look at the weather forecast at Oshkosh a little closer when packing my suite case....I did not have anything except for shorts and short sleeve shirts. I met several Dragonfly guys, I had nice chats with Ed Schneider, Charlie Hannan, Steve Krueger, and Rich Goldman. Saw Bruce Crain's Tri-Q200, but did not see Bruce. Had a chance to talk with Doug Humble (Q-Talk newsletter editor) over in the vintage aircraft area. Charlie Hannan works right on KOSH so he loaned me a warm shirt and took me into town to buy something. Friday was a beautiful day.
          >
          >
          >
          > Getting out of KOSH at about 0730 on Saturday was straight forward. Departed on 18R and then once again flew in some light rain and very stiff winds back to Rochelle. Very nice guy at the FBO helped me with weather and coming up with a good route. I decided I would stop at Owensboro, KY (OWB) which I completed without any problems. After I got the plane fueled up at OWB I was met by a nice old guy who was building an RV. Then a couple more guys came up and they ended up taking me over to their flying club building where I used the restroom, filled my water bottle, and got some more help with flight planning and the use of a computer. There were some thunderstorms coming across AL so I ended up selecting Rome, GA (KRMG) for my last fuel stop before my home field of Headland, AL (0J6). This leg of the flight also went smooth, but the winds were strong at RMG due to some thunderstorms in the vicinity. Got gas and checked weather. Had to dodge a couple thunderstorms near Auburn, AL, but it was actually an easy flight (compared to most of the rest of my trip). Landed back at 0J6 after logging 8.7 hours on the tach on Saturday.
          >
          >
          >
          > Totals for my trip were:
          >
          > 69.91 gallons of 100LL used
          >
          > 18.2 total tach hours
          >
          > 3.841 GPH average fuel economy
          >
          > 28.7 MPG average
          >
          > 2006 Statute Miles
          >
          > (Fuel used, average fuel economy, and MPG are estimates based on the first ~16.5 hours of the trip since they are currently out of fuel at my home field and I could not top off at the end of my trip).
          >
          >
          >
          > Jeff
          >
          > Dragonfly MK-IIH - N41GK
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jon Finley
          Thanks for the report Jeff! I always enjoy reading about what others go thru - it helps make my trips seem more normal . ;-) Jon Finley N314JF - Q2 - Subaru
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 5, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks for the report Jeff! I always enjoy reading about what others go
            thru - it helps make my trips seem more "normal". ;-)


            Jon Finley
            N314JF - Q2 - Subaru EJ-22
            http://www.finleyweb.net/Q2Subaru.aspx



            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com
            > [mailto:Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Letempt, Jeffrey A
            > CIV USA
            > Sent: Wednesday, August 05, 2009 9:21 AM
            > To: Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [Dragonflylist] AirVenture 2009 Trip Report - LONG
            >
            > Had a very eventful trip to AirVenture 2009, but I am back in AL with
            > my Dragonfly all in one piece...so how bad could it have been?
            >
            >
            >
            > I left LA (Lower Alabama) on Tuesday morning. I knew before I left
            > that I was going to have to detour north towards Chattanooga, TN before
            <snip>
          • Darrell
            Jeff, It sounds like you had an exciting and challenging trip!! I ve looked at the map, and I believe you came within about 40 miles of here...Tompkinsville,
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 9, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Jeff,
              It sounds like you had an exciting and challenging trip!!
              I've looked at the map, and I believe you came within about 40 miles of here...Tompkinsville, Ky (TZV)
              If you're ever in the area again, give me a call, and we'll accomodate you.
              Blessings,
              Darrell
              Mk1 N115DP in TZV
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