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Re: [Dragonflylist] First Flight

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  • Mitch Hargin
    Chris, This morning was a ok day. Accept for a left 9kt crosswind, it was 32 degrees and sunny. Pushed the power to 3200 rpm and rolled out.  At around 50
    Message 1 of 77 , Jan 2, 2009
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      Chris,
      This morning was a ok day. Accept for a left 9kt crosswind, it was 32 degrees and sunny. Pushed the power to 3200 rpm and rolled out.  At around 50 mph the tail came up and at 60-65mph the MKII started skidding to the right side of the runway with neutral elavator.  Giving it a little left rudder and full back pressure it lifted off and went to centerline but speed and altitude didn't change.  Around 70+mph and 4 ft off the runway, with a split second decision I cut power and put it back on the runway.  Having some trouble keeping it on centerline it stopped with 1/5th runway remaining.  Should I have tried to build up speed and went on?  The skidding sideways sent out the redflags in my mind.  How are Dragonflys in a crosswind? 
      Mitch

      --- On Fri, 12/19/08, dkeats <dkeats@...> wrote:

      From: dkeats <dkeats@...>
      Subject: Re: [Dragonflylist] First Flight
      To: Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, December 19, 2008, 7:08 PM






      Mitch------- -- I agree with Jeff completely. A few more things to be
      aware of is that if your back wing starts top lift before 40 mph it is
      most likely that you cg is to far forward. I find on my airplane it
      likes to fly closer to the aft cg range. You need to taxi ALOT and get
      used to the rudder and wing lift. As Jeff said when you fly, hold it in
      ground effect and when you see 90 --100 mph you can climb out, but, not
      in a real nose high attitude like a spam can. Also when you fist leave
      the runway, be very carefull of pilot induced ossilations. The elevators
      are very sensitive, and it is easy to overcorect and start to porpose.
      When you first start to land I try to fly it over the threshold at
      around 80mph and then get a foot above the runway and just don't let it
      land. Once the speed bleads of it will land by itself. If you try to
      flair as in a conventional airplane, because the Dragonfly is slippery,
      it will start to climb, then slow down and drop onto the runway. Ouch
      It's not difficult to fly , just different. Have fun--------- -------
      Canada Chris -40 F and five more months till flying.


















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • dflybldr
      It s also harder to scratch the paint the more altitude you have! Remember the only time you have too much altitue and too much fuel is when your on fire :-)
      Message 77 of 77 , Jan 8, 2009
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        It's also harder to scratch the paint the more altitude you have!

        Remember the only time you have too much altitue and too much fuel
        is when your on fire :-)

        --- In Dragonflylist@yahoogroups.com, dkeats <dkeats@...> wrote:
        >
        > Mitch---------- God to see you went flying, even if it was only
        four
        > feet up. Tes the Dragonfly is a bit of a handfull in a cross
        wind. It
        > does get squirrely on takeoff. I find it almost eadier to land
        than to
        > takeoff in a crosswind. You may of been getting a bit of the
        torque
        > factor from the engine, and if you have a Mark two and the wheels
        aren't
        > aligned properley that will also be a problem. To check wheel
        alignment
        > I clamp a long straight edge to each tire rim. Like in a H
        patern. I
        > then measure the distance in the front and the back. They should
        be the
        > same.If you drop a plumb bob off the spinner and put a chock line
        from
        > there to the tail. You can then measure to that to see which wheel
        if
        > off. Clear a mudd??? If your engine is running well and you have
        no
        > real concerns you may want to actually go flying and get used to
        it.
        > If you have enough fuel you can do as many aproaches as you need.
        If you
        > were already four feet in the air doing seventy, technically you
        did
        > your first landing and all the rest are similar. Get comfortable
        and
        > don't let it get ahead of you . Have fun--------- Canada Chris
        >
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