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ancient Chinese currency

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  • Gary Todd
    There are a number of books published (mostly in China, but one by David Jen called Chinese Cash is in English) which show facsimilies of most known forms of
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 21, 2009
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      There are a number of books published (mostly in China, but one by David Jen called Chinese Cash is in English) which show facsimilies of most known forms of Chinese cash. The later Han used almost exclusively the wuzhu coin, first minted during the reign of Han Wudi (141-87 BC) around 100 BC. This type of coin cointinued to be minted for nearly 700 years, through the Sui. If you want to see images, I have some posted on my www.GaryLeeTodd.com website. Look under the category "Chinese Museums and Artifacts" and somewhere on the list will be four albums of coins from my personal collection. They are mostly in chronological order. Also, during the Wang Mang interregnum (Xin Dynasty) there was a bunch of new coinage and unusual styles (some posted on my album), but with the fall of Wang Mang, they mostly went out of circulation.
       
      I've never heard of leather coinage anywhere. They were not official, but I suppose someone could have privately made them for local use (like "wooden nickels" in America). Private coinage did flourish before Wudi, as I have some banliang coins minted in lead, which almost certainly came from a private mint. I think I have in one of my Shanghai Museum albums some photos of blocks used for printing of money. Unfortunately, photo-hosting websites are still being blocked in China, so I have not been able to view the pictures in my own website, nor add to my website a few thousand photos I have taken in Chinese museums recently. But you should be able to view them anywhere outside of China.
       
      Gary L. Todd, Ph.D.
      Professor of History
      SIas International University
      Xinzheng, Henan, China
      www.GaryLeeTodd.com (Chinese and World History)

    • kim kheong ho
      Hi Professor Todd, Well written and seen the gallery as below described. I must say it s a detailed description and comprehensive collection. It must be a
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 21, 2009
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        Hi Professor Todd,

        Well written and seen the gallery as below described. I must say it's a detailed description and comprehensive collection. It must be a tedious process to mark and catalogue all the photos and not to mention the travelling and soaking up foreign cultures along the way. My best compliment to you and your team being able for us to view these collections at our own home. 

        Once again thank you for sharing such valuable knowledge which I believe history is indeed an interesting subject to all again.

        With best regards,
        KK
        Malaysia

        --- On Thu, 22/10/09, Gary Todd <leefoxx1949@...> wrote:

        From: Gary Todd <leefoxx1949@...>
        Subject: [DSL] ancient Chinese currency
        To: DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, 22 October, 2009, 8:30 AM

         

        There are a number of books published (mostly in China, but one by David Jen called Chinese Cash is in English) which show facsimilies of most known forms of Chinese cash. The later Han used almost exclusively the wuzhu coin, first minted during the reign of Han Wudi (141-87 BC) around 100 BC. This type of coin cointinued to be minted for nearly 700 years, through the Sui. If you want to see images, I have some posted on my www.GaryLeeTodd. com website. Look under the category "Chinese Museums and Artifacts" and somewhere on the list will be four albums of coins from my personal collection. They are mostly in chronological order. Also, during the Wang Mang interregnum (Xin Dynasty) there was a bunch of new coinage and unusual styles (some posted on my album), but with the fall of Wang Mang, they mostly went out of circulation.
         
        I've never heard of leather coinage anywhere. They were not official, but I suppose someone could have privately made them for local use (like "wooden nickels" in America). Private coinage did flourish before Wudi, as I have some banliang coins minted in lead, which almost certainly came from a private mint. I think I have in one of my Shanghai Museum albums some photos of blocks used for printing of money. Unfortunately, photo-hosting websites are still being blocked in China, so I have not been able to view the pictures in my own website, nor add to my website a few thousand photos I have taken in Chinese museums recently. But you should be able to view them anywhere outside of China.
         
        Gary L. Todd, Ph.D.
        Professor of History
        SIas International University
        Xinzheng, Henan, China
        www.GaryLeeTodd. com (Chinese and World History)


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