Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Chinese New Year

Expand Messages
  • kitmengleong
    Ah Alex, Sorry, my gf just corrected me. The upside down Fu represents that Fu (luck/prosperity) has arrived. The word overturned in Chinese sounds like
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 31, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Ah Alex,

      Sorry, my gf just corrected me. The upside down Fu represents that
      Fu (luck/prosperity) has arrived.

      The word "overturned" in Chinese sounds like "arrived", so an
      "overturned" Fu when read out loud sounds like "arrived" Fu.

      Jieming
      DragonSeedLegacy
      ChineseCultureOnline


      --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, "kitmengleong" <kmleong@a...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Ah Alex,
      >
      > If you count, the picture is made out of exactly 2005 small
      > characters for Fu.
      >
      > Why is it sometime upside down? Because it represents Fu falling
      > (ie.dropping at your feet). :-)
      >
      > Jieming
      > DragonSeedLegacy
      > ChineseCultureOnline
      >
      >
      > --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, Alessandro Ranieri
      > <alexcranieri@y...> wrote:
      > > I recognise word on home page. It mean luck. I see it on many
      > Chinese New Year decoration. My question, why is sometimes upside
      > down? Does it mean luckier if word is upside down?
      > >
      > > Alex.
      > >
      > >
      > > ---------------------------------
      > > ALL-NEW Yahoo! Messenger - all new features - even more fun!
    • Alessandro Ranieri
      Ah Jieming, thank to your gf for explanation of Fu. I have another question. Hehehe. Jane know I have many question. I notice some shops in Chinatown now
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Ah Jieming, thank to your gf for explanation of Fu. I have another question. Hehehe. Jane know I have many question. I notice some shops in Chinatown now sellling the tangerine plant. Many Chinese families buy it every Chinese New Year. Is it good luck to keep one in apartment?
         
        Thanks,
        Alex. 


        ALL-NEW Yahoo! Messenger - all new features - even more fun!
      • kitmengleong
        Hehehe, ok another one I had to ask my gf on. She says the name for tangerines in mandarin or cantonese sounds like lucky so that s why people buy them and
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 1, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Hehehe, ok another one I had to ask my gf on. She says the name for
          tangerines in mandarin or cantonese sounds like "lucky" so that's why
          people buy them and put them at home. Besides, they look nice don't they?

          Jieming
          DragonSeedLegacy
          ChineseCultureOnline

          --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, Alessandro Ranieri
          <alexcranieri@y...> wrote:
          > Ah Jieming, thank to your gf for explanation of Fu. I have another
          question. Hehehe. Jane know I have many question. I notice some shops
          in Chinatown now sellling the tangerine plant. Many Chinese families
          buy it every Chinese New Year. Is it good luck to keep one in apartment?
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Alex.
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > ALL-NEW Yahoo! Messenger - all new features - even more fun!
        • ming18ming2003
          Alex, yes, you do. :) It s very good, I think. Keep asking and whenever you have a question! I am sure Jieming and a lot of us will try to give you an answer.
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 2, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Alex, yes, you do. :) It's very good, I think.

            Keep asking and whenever you have a question! I am sure Jieming and a
            lot of us will try to give you an answer.

            Jane



            --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, Alessandro Ranieri
            <alexcranieri@y...> wrote:
            > Ah Jieming, thank to your gf for explanation of Fu. I have another
            question. Hehehe. Jane know I have many question. I notice some shops
            in Chinatown now sellling the tangerine plant. Many Chinese families
            buy it every Chinese New Year. Is it good luck to keep one in
            apartment?
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Alex.
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > ALL-NEW Yahoo! Messenger - all new features - even more fun!
          • Rachel Tatner
            So is that different from Oranges? I heard the Oranges were for plenty of children. I can t remember if it s because of the word for the color Orange or
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 3, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              So is that different from Oranges? 
               
              I heard the Oranges were for plenty of children.
               
              I can't remember if it's because of the word for the color Orange or Gold....or because of the name for the Orange fruit itself.
               
              Speaking of things like this...does anyone know of a list for what various things represent because of what they sound like?
               
              For example - 3 is lucky, 4 is death
               
              I know yellow/gold and green also mean something.
               
              Would be nice to have a list to refer to.
               
              Rachel 
               
              -------Original Message-------
               
              Date: 02/02/05 00:51:19
              Subject: [DragonSeedLegacy] Re: Chinese New Year
               

              Hehehe, ok another one I had to ask my gf on.  She says the name for
              tangerines in mandarin or cantonese sounds like "lucky" so that's why
              people buy them and put them at home.  Besides, they look nice don't they?

              Jieming
              DragonSeedLegacy
              ChineseCultureOnline

              --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, Alessandro Ranieri
              <alexcranieri@y...> wrote:
              > Ah Jieming, thank to your gf for explanation of Fu. I have another
              question. Hehehe. Jane know I have many question. I notice some shops
              in Chinatown now sellling the tangerine plant. Many Chinese families
              buy it every Chinese New Year. Is it good luck to keep one in apartment?

              > Thanks,
              > Alex.
              >
              >            
              Add FUN to your email - CLICK HERE!
            • (no author)
              There are two aspects to nationalism: 1)Patriotism (its idealistic aspect) and 2)Geopolitical Realism (its realist aspect) Patriotism is inspired by ancestral
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 3, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                There are two aspects to nationalism: 1)Patriotism (its idealistic
                aspect) and 2)Geopolitical Realism (its realist aspect)
                Patriotism is inspired by "ancestral heritage", such as that felt by a
                Jew for anywhere identified as "Historical Judea", or that of a
                Bosnian for a place in Croatia where his ancestor used to live.
                Geopolitical Realism addresses the necessity of territorial integrity
                and nation-state security. The realistic way of designating ancient
                Judea as "Palestinian West Bank" while holding ancient Galelee, Negev
                and Samaria (not "Judean" lands in the strictest sense, and was even
                the lands of heathens and Syrians in the case of Galelee and Negev),
                or the realistic way of sliding former Yugoslavia into Serbia, Croatia
                and Bosnia, and dividing Bosnia further into Muslim-held Bosnia
                Proper, Serb Krayina and Croat territory stem from such realistic
                thinking.

                A "country" in its abstract, national sense is a separate thing
                altogether from the land that shares the same name. Before July 7
                1997, was Hong Kong geographically "China" or "Great Britain"? Are
                Penghu(Pescadores), Jinmen(Quemoy) "Taiwan" or "China"? Are they part
                of the "Fujian Province" or part of the "Taiwan Province"? Is
                Guantanamo "United States" or "Cuba"?

                The 17th century Westphalian system was one designed to compromise the
                previously Catholic empires-dominated European system with the rise of
                European absolutist states centered around the monarch rather than
                the Church-nobility complex. However, the making of modern nations was
                not complete yet, as the will of geo-realist nationalism can still
                supercede the will of patrio-idealistic nationalism in the competition
                among Western European colonial powers for empires.

                The 1921 Wilsonian System was one disign to crystalize the concept of
                the modern nation: it subjects the will of geo-realistic nationalism
                to the will of patrio-idealistic nationalism, making it illegitimate
                for one nation to forge an empire at the expense of others based on
                geo-realistic considerations.

                Imagine a contemporary world without the Wilsonian System: it would
                bear all the resemblance to any period of "warring states" throughout
                history. In China, we mark five such major periods that merit the
                name of "dai" (era): Chun-Qiu Zhan-Guo, Three Kingdoms, Wu-Hu
                Shiliu-Guo Nan-Bei Chao, Wu-Dai Shi-Guo, Liao-Song-Xia-Jin. As you can
                see, the identity and boundaries of the states in these periods were
                not inspired by patriotism, but by territorial, geopolitical necessities.

                An outstanding example of state formation in a warring states period
                in world history would be the inauguration of the Timurid Mughal
                Empire in South Asia following the Battle of Delhi. Babur, a native of
                Samarkhand in modern day Uzbekistan, after losing his home turf to
                invading "Kazakh Uzbeks", set off to the south seeking shelter and
                footholds in Afghanistan. Invited by Punjabi princes, he attacked the
                Ghuri Sultanate of Delhi, which was of Afghani origin, and gained an
                empire thousands of miles from Samarkhand and Afghanistan.
                Babur might be a "patriot" in the sense that till death he remained a
                Dari and Chagatay Turki speaker, and always placed before everything,
                his love for the gates of Samarkhand and the gardens of Kabul. But in
                his empire-making, this spiritual patriotism in no way got in the way
                of geopolitical thinking.

                Under the current Wilsonian System, the incompatibility between
                criteria of legitimacy of state and loyalty then and now, is the major
                source between Muslim nationalists (calling themselves "Pakistanis" in
                or outside of the modern state of Pakistan) and their Hindu, Sikh and
                anti-Muslim rivals.
              • kitmengleong
                Hi Rachel, How s the new year forming up where you re at? Mandarin oranges (as opposed to oranges) or Kam in cantonese sounds like the word for Gold . :-)
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 3, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Rachel,

                  How's the new year forming up where you're at?

                  Mandarin oranges (as opposed to oranges) or "Kam" in cantonese sounds
                  like the word for "Gold". :-)

                  I'm not sure if such a list exists. New ones are constantly being
                  made. Let's see what we can compile here. Everyone, do feel free to
                  contribute if you know any.

                  Here are a few (might not be that accurate).

                  Mandarin Oranges - Gold
                  Fish - Plenty
                  Tangerines - Lucky
                  2 - easy (only in cantonese)
                  4 - death
                  3 - life
                  8 - prosper
                  9 - long (as in longevity) (only in mandarin)
                  7 - rise (as in to rise up) (only in mandarin)
                  13 - sure to live
                  14 - sure to die
                  18 - sure to prosper
                  others (17, 19)
                  23 - easy to live
                  (others 24, 27, 28, 29)
                  328 - business prospers
                  1628 - prosperity all along the way

                  Jieming
                  DragonSeedLegacy
                  ChineseCultureOnline



                  --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, "Rachel Tatner" <rattat@s...>
                  wrote:
                  > So is that different from Oranges?
                  >
                  > I heard the Oranges were for plenty of children.
                  >
                  > I can't remember if it's because of the word for the color Orange or
                  Gold...
                  > or because of the name for the Orange fruit itself.
                  >
                  > Speaking of things like this...does anyone know of a list for what
                  various
                  > things represent because of what they sound like?
                  >
                  > For example - 3 is lucky, 4 is death
                  >
                  > I know yellow/gold and green also mean something.
                  >
                  > Would be nice to have a list to refer to.
                  >
                  > Rachel
                  >
                  > -------Original Message-------
                  >
                  > From: DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: 02/02/05 00:51:19
                  > To: DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [DragonSeedLegacy] Re: Chinese New Year
                  >
                  >
                  > Hehehe, ok another one I had to ask my gf on. She says the name for
                  > tangerines in mandarin or cantonese sounds like "lucky" so that's why
                  > people buy them and put them at home. Besides, they look nice don't
                  they?
                  >
                  > Jieming
                  > DragonSeedLegacy
                  > ChineseCultureOnline
                  >
                  > --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, Alessandro Ranieri
                  > <alexcranieri@y...> wrote:
                  > > Ah Jieming, thank to your gf for explanation of Fu. I have another
                  > question. Hehehe. Jane know I have many question. I notice some shops
                  > in Chinatown now sellling the tangerine plant. Many Chinese families
                  > buy it every Chinese New Year. Is it good luck to keep one in apartment?
                  > >
                  > > Thanks,
                  > > Alex.
                  > >
                  > >
                • Rachel
                  Thanks for the list! If you don t mind, I d like to crosspost this to ChineseCultureOnline. Rachel ... sounds ... to ... ... Orange or ... what
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 8, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thanks for the list!

                    If you don't mind, I'd like to crosspost this to
                    ChineseCultureOnline.

                    Rachel





                    --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, "kitmengleong"
                    <kmleong@a...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Rachel,
                    >
                    > How's the new year forming up where you're at?
                    >
                    > Mandarin oranges (as opposed to oranges) or "Kam" in cantonese
                    sounds
                    > like the word for "Gold". :-)
                    >
                    > I'm not sure if such a list exists. New ones are constantly being
                    > made. Let's see what we can compile here. Everyone, do feel free
                    to
                    > contribute if you know any.
                    >


                    > Here are a few (might not be that accurate).
                    >
                    > Mandarin Oranges - Gold
                    > Fish - Plenty
                    > Tangerines - Lucky
                    > 2 - easy (only in cantonese)
                    > 4 - death
                    > 3 - life
                    > 8 - prosper
                    > 9 - long (as in longevity) (only in mandarin)
                    > 7 - rise (as in to rise up) (only in mandarin)
                    > 13 - sure to live
                    > 14 - sure to die
                    > 18 - sure to prosper
                    > others (17, 19)
                    > 23 - easy to live
                    > (others 24, 27, 28, 29)
                    > 328 - business prospers
                    > 1628 - prosperity all along the way
                    >
                    > Jieming
                    > DragonSeedLegacy
                    > ChineseCultureOnline
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, "Rachel Tatner"
                    <rattat@s...>
                    > wrote:
                    > > So is that different from Oranges?
                    > >
                    > > I heard the Oranges were for plenty of children.
                    > >
                    > > I can't remember if it's because of the word for the color
                    Orange or
                    > Gold...
                    > > or because of the name for the Orange fruit itself.
                    > >
                    > > Speaking of things like this...does anyone know of a list for
                    what
                    > various
                    > > things represent because of what they sound like?
                    > >
                    > > For example - 3 is lucky, 4 is death
                    > >
                    > > I know yellow/gold and green also mean something.
                    > >
                    > > Would be nice to have a list to refer to.
                    > >
                    > > Rachel
                    > >
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.