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903Re: Chronology of Chinese History and Culture

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  • ming18ming2003
    Oct 1 6:02 AM
      Thanks a lot Jieming! Yea, i now can recall something, the calendar
      is counted by using chinese words like tian zhi, di gan, yes, every
      cycle is 60 years, i can remember now, somebody has ever talked about
      this in another forum. I need to find the article and read it again
      when i have some mopre time.

      Jane :)


      --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, "kitmengleong"
      <kmleong@a...> wrote:
      > Hi Jane,
      >
      > Here's what I found from
      > webexhibits.org/calendars/calendar-chinese.html.
      >
      > "In China, the calendar was a sacred document, sponsored and
      > promulgated by the reigning monarch. For more than two millennia, a
      > Bureau of Astronomy made astronomical observations, calculated
      > astronomical events such as eclipses, prepared astrological
      > predictions, and maintained the calendar.
      >
      > Evidence from the Shang oracle bone inscriptions shows that at least
      > by the 14th century BC the Shang Chinese had established the solar
      > year at 365 1/4 days and lunation at 29 1/2 days. In the calendar
      that
      > the Shang used, the seasons of the year and the phases of the Moon
      > were all supposedly accounted for.
      >
      > So when did the calendar really start? If the Chinese calendar
      > started in 2637 B.C.E., why is the current year 60 years too late?
      > (e.g., in 1999, the current year was 4697? and not 4637)?
      >
      > The Chinese calendar does not use a continuous year count! They
      used a
      > 60 year cycle and a system of regional years (starting with each
      > emperor). Before the 1911 revolution, Sun Yat-sen wanted to
      establish
      > a republican alternative to the imperial reign cycles. According to
      > Chinese tradition, the first year of the Yellow Emperor was 2698
      > B.C.E., so he introduced a counting system based on this. Under this
      > system, 2000 is year 4698."
      >
      > So, to answer your original question, the start date of 2698 is the
      > first year of the Yellow Emperor and was established by Sun Yat-sen
      as
      > the official start date. An alternative system is to start with the
      > first historical record of the 60-day cycle from March 8, 2637
      B.C.E.
      > Based on this system, 2000 is year 4637.
      >
      > Jieming
      > DragonSeedLegacy
      > ChineseCultureOnline
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, "ming18ming2003"
      > <ming18ming2003@y...> wrote:
      > > I still have questions about this calendar. Can you please tell
      who
      > > invented it and how it was counted? I am aware that the year in
      the
      > > dynasties were counted with the name of the emperor and followed
      with
      > > the number of years of his reign. For example, Guangxi the 1st
      > > implying that is the the first year of Guangxi emperor (in Qing
      > > Dynasty)'s reign.
      > >
      > > thanks
      > >
      > > Jane
      > >
      > > --- In DragonSeedLegacy@yahoogroups.com, "kitmengleong"
      > > <kmleong@a...> wrote:
      > > > Hi Jane,
      > > >
      > > > Didn't get to answer this earlier. The current Chinese year
      is
      > > 4701.
      > > >
      > > > Jieming
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > "2698 B.C. The beginning of the Chinese calendar."
      > > > >
      > > > > What's that?
      > > > >
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