Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

another poem; this one by Dee?

Expand Messages
  • tmbtmbtmbtmbtmbtmb
    Greetings. . . below is a little sonnet that appears as prefatory material in the first English edition (1591) of Ripley s compound of alchemy. It comes two
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings. . . below is a little sonnet that appears as prefatory material in the first English edition (1591) of Ripley's compound of alchemy. It comes two pages before a poem by Kelley (the one to G.S. Gent mentioned often before here), and I assume its by Dee. . . yet no one I'm aware of seems to have made that attribution.

      Has anyone here perused this before? Any other idea who this J.D. Gent could be?

      J.D. gent: in praise of the Author [Ripley] and his Worke

      Loe here a Worke, conteining rare effects,
      Repleate with ripest frutes of Ripleys toyle,
      Whose mellowed sauour studious mindes directs
      T'attaine the skill that may enrich their soile:
      And though his Booke be carped at by Zoile ,
      Yet doth the same comprize such depth of Art,
      As makes his fame eternizd by desart.

      The learned will (no doubt) delight therein,
      And their delight will draw them on to skill:
      Admit the simple force it not a pin,
      So much the more the wise embrace it will.
      Who seekes by Arte to clymbe vp Honors hill,
      To such perteynes this precious Stone diuine,
      For pease are fitter farre, than Pearle for Swine.

      Tam Arte, quam Marte.

      Now, along with S.E.K. (Sir Edward Kelley) there's introductory material by a few others: a long letter by Raph Rabbards, Latin verse by "Thomas Newtonus Cestryshireius" (aka Thomas Newton of Cheshire), "P. Bales" who I have no idea at all who may be??, and "The Summe of this worke, learnedly reduced into a few verses by the divine Poet Palingenius." Palingenius is an Italian poet aka Marcellus Palingenius Stellatus, whose epic philosophical poem, Zodiacus Vitae, was divided into twelve books, one for each sign of the zodiac, in the 1530s. Ripleys' work which follows is of course divided into the 12 Gates.

      LVX,

      Terri
    • tmbtmbtmbtmbtmbtmb
      P. Bales is Peter Bales, who Stanton Linden in his edited edition of this 1591 edition says was quite well known in his time as a handwriting expert, teacher,
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 3, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        P. Bales is Peter Bales, who Stanton Linden in his edited edition of this 1591 edition says was "quite well known in his time as a handwriting expert, teacher, and author who had connections with the world of Elizabethan espionage" (xxviii). Apparentingly Bales's handwriting expertise was critical in discovering the Babington plot; his patrons included Walsingham, Hatton, and perhaps Thomas Phelippes.

        Looking at what happens to hose connected to this edition of the Compound of Alchemy may shed a bit more light on how spy circles were shifting and reforming just after Dee's return from the continent.

        LVX,

        Terri

        --- In AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee@yahoogroups.com, "tmbtmbtmbtmbtmbtmb" <burnst@...> wrote:
        >
        > Greetings. . . below is a little sonnet that appears as prefatory material in the first English edition (1591) of Ripley's compound of alchemy. It comes two pages before a poem by Kelley (the one to G.S. Gent mentioned often before here), and I assume its by Dee. . . yet no one I'm aware of seems to have made that attribution.
        >
        > Has anyone here perused this before? Any other idea who this J.D. Gent could be?
        >
        > J.D. gent: in praise of the Author [Ripley] and his Worke
        >
        > Loe here a Worke, conteining rare effects,
        > Repleate with ripest frutes of Ripleys toyle,
        > Whose mellowed sauour studious mindes directs
        > T'attaine the skill that may enrich their soile:
        > And though his Booke be carped at by Zoile ,
        > Yet doth the same comprize such depth of Art,
        > As makes his fame eternizd by desart.
        >
        > The learned will (no doubt) delight therein,
        > And their delight will draw them on to skill:
        > Admit the simple force it not a pin,
        > So much the more the wise embrace it will.
        > Who seekes by Arte to clymbe vp Honors hill,
        > To such perteynes this precious Stone diuine,
        > For pease are fitter farre, than Pearle for Swine.
        >
        > Tam Arte, quam Marte.
        >
        > Now, along with S.E.K. (Sir Edward Kelley) there's introductory material by a few others: a long letter by Raph Rabbards, Latin verse by "Thomas Newtonus Cestryshireius" (aka Thomas Newton of Cheshire), "P. Bales" who I have no idea at all who may be??, and "The Summe of this worke, learnedly reduced into a few verses by the divine Poet Palingenius." Palingenius is an Italian poet aka Marcellus Palingenius Stellatus, whose epic philosophical poem, Zodiacus Vitae, was divided into twelve books, one for each sign of the zodiac, in the 1530s. Ripleys' work which follows is of course divided into the 12 Gates.
        >
        > LVX,
        >
        > Terri
        >
      • tmbtmbtmbtmbtmbtmb
        The circle connected to the first English edition of Ripley s Compound of Alchemy- 1591 (George Ripley was an English alchemist supposedly in possession of the
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 3, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          The circle connected to the first English edition of Ripley's Compound of Alchemy- 1591

          (George Ripley was an English alchemist supposedly in possession of the secret of the grand transmutation, who lived 1415-1490; allegedly possessed secret by 1478. His travels in Louvain may have influenced Dee's desire to go there. His symbolism is that most echoed by Kelley. Many copies of his 12 gates and Compund of Alchemy circulate in manuscript form.)

          Mystery surrounds the publication of the first English edition in 1591, which includes poems by Dee and Kelley and a long intro by "Raph Rabbards," who appears nowhere else yet found in alchemical literature. The printer, Orwin, runs into some sort of trouble just after the printing, and dies a couple of years later.

          1587-1591 printer Orwin's business flourishes. According to Linden, he printed "among many other types of books, collections of sermons, prayers, and meditations, and Peter Bale's _The Writinge Schoolmaster_. Bales, along with Dee, Kelley, and Thomas Newton of Cheshire, are the living writers who have prefatory material in the 1591 edition of the Compound of Alchemy.

          A timeline of what's happening to Dee, Kelley, Francis Garland, Orwin, and Rabbards 1588-1593

          1588 Dee, Kelley, and Garland preoccupied which several magical and alchemical operations we have no record of. One assumes some connection to the build-up surrounding the Spanish Armada. Garland returns to England in November but is back by the next year. Orwin publishing in England; in 1588 his works include "A ballad of the strange whippes whiche the Spanyards had prepared [for] Englishemen and women."

          1589 Dee and Kelley part company. Dee begins the year in Trebona then returns to England by way of Denmark. Dee's daughter, Madimi, is conceived along the way. Garland, with others including Thomas Kelley and his Polish-Bohemian wife, returns to England in early June. Edward Kelly's poem "The praise of Unity for Friendships Sake," elsewhere dedicated to "G.S., Gent" written or copied in Prague; it winds up in Denmark likely via England. Dee returns to Motlake by years end and received word from Thomas Kelley that he says puts him in hopes Edward Kelley will return to England. Orwin publishing.

          1590 Dee in Mortlake. Francis Walsingham, Dee's neighbor and Peter Bales' patron, dies. Edward Dyer returns from Prague. Dee writes to Kelley in June and the same month hears of his "open enmity" against him. More letters between Dee and Kelley with Francis Garland and Thomas Kelley as the conduits; obvious maneauvering of some sort connected to the circle that was in Prague. Magical entries concerning his wife. Dee trying to get a postof some sort. The Queen appears to make him a large promise of some sort that is never named, that he will be able to do what he wants in "philosophy and alchemy." Orwin publishing.

          1591 No mention of Francis Garland or Garland brothers in Dee's diary; later entries suggest he has been in Prague part of this time period. Kelley in Prague at height of alchemical influence the first part of this year; Sir Edward Dyer in Prague with Kelley. Orwin publishes first printed edition of Ripley's "Compound of Alchemy." The edition includes a long letter from "Raph Rabbards" to Elizabeth, another long letter from Rabbards to "worthy Gentlemen of England & other industrious students in the secrets of Philosophy," and opening commendatory verses by Dee, Kelley, Bales, Newton, and Palinginus. The 1589 Kelley poem this has come back to England by this time, likely via Garland and/or Thomas Kelley. Dee appears to be trying to get an income and receiving many visitors. By the end of spring Kelley is missing and Dyer is in prison in Prague. Lord Burgley sends Thomas Webbe to Bohemia to get his release, by July Edward Dyer and Thomas Webbe leave Prague. One would think Webbe would return a hero, but something shifts in the next year and a half and Webbe winds up in prison for coining.

          Orwin does something this year that incurs the wrath of the Stationer's register and they stop his business and confiscate his press. Could it be publishing this work? One suspects that the "alchemical climate" in England shifts radically when it becomes apparent that Kelley not only isn't coming back to England but is a fugitive, and Dyer is in jail in Prague. By August 30, 1591, Orwin has apparently apologized for whatever it was that he did and requested his press be returned, and the company of stationers approve his request and allow him to begin publishing again "so long as he behaves himself."

          Orwin dies within two years after this but no one knows how; by 1593 his widow is operating the business.

          Rabbards appears in this book, this year, and nowhere else in English letters.

          1592 Robert Greene warns other writers about an "upstart crow," likely Shakespeare, and disparages Marlowe as an atheist. January 1592 Marlowe's Doctor Faustus performed at the Theater through April. No mention of Francis Garland or Garland brothers in Dee's diary; Kelley's troubles increasing. Dee involved in some sort of bargaining for positions. Sometime after discussing Kabbalah with Emporer Rudolf II in Prague in February, Rabbi Loew moves from Prague to Poland and becomes Poland's chief rabbi. Giordano Bruno, in Italy, is turned over to the Inqusition.

          1593 Dee receives letters from Kelley via Francis Garland. (Also, Venus and Adonis entered in Stationer's register; firstyear of Shakespeare's rise to fame.) The Garland manuscripts in Denmark mainly bear the years 1593-1595; it would seem Kelley's 1589 poem is taken to England,printed with the others in 1591, and by 1593-1595 taken by Garland to Denmark. Orwin is dead. Kelley is in prison; later freed; will wind up in prison again. Webbe arrested for coining and it appears he may be executed (though it turns out he is not) ; intertwined events of Hesketh plot.

          Plot continues, but Orwin and Rabbard only make this brief surfacing in it. It's Orwin's 1591 edition of the Compound of Alchemy that Ashmole refers to in the middle of the next century.

          LVX,

          Terri
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.