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Dee and Euclid

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  • Terri Burns
    Greetings-- for any of you who are interested, I ve been going through a couple of databases trying to pull out articles on John Dee and Euclid (since Dee
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 24, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings-- for any of you who are interested, I've been going
      through a couple of databases trying to pull out articles on John Dee
      and Euclid (since Dee wrote the preface to the first English
      translation of Euclid's elements, in 1570-- a fascimile of the title
      page is on-line at
      http://www.envf.port.ac.uk/illustration/z/per/cmullen/035.HTM)

      If anyone is interested in any of these, I can post them in .pdf form
      to the files section.

      Commandino, John Dee, and the De superficierum Divisionibus of
      Machometus Bagdedinus (in Notes & Correspondence)
      Paul Lawrence Rose
      Isis, Vol. 63, No. 1. (Mar., 1972), pp. 88-93.

      The First Translation of Euclid's Elements into English and its
      Source
      R. C. Archibald
      The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 57, No. 7. (Aug. - Sep.,
      1950), pp. 443-452.

      The Distinctive Features of Seventeenth Century Geometry
      F. W. Kokomoor
      Isis, Vol. 10, No. 2. (Jun., 1928), pp. 367-415.

      Astrology in Shakespeare's Day
      Carroll Camden, Jr.
      Isis, Vol. 19, No. 1. (Apr., 1933), pp. 26-73.

      The Early Editions of Robert Recorde's Ground of Artes
      Joy B. Easton
      Isis, Vol. 58, No. 4. (Winter, 1967), pp. 515-532.

      The Scientific Literature Transmitted through the Incunabula
      George Sarton
      Osiris, Vol. 5. (1938), pp. 41-123+125-245.
      NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.

      The Scientific Spirit in England in Early Modern Times (c. 1600)
      Raymond Phineas Stearns
      Isis, Vol. 34, No. 4. (Spring, 1943), pp. 293-300.

      Witelo and Thirteenth-Century Mathematics: An Assessment of His
      Contributions
      Sabetai Unguru
      Isis, Vol. 63, No. 4. (Dec., 1972), pp. 496-508.

      Note on the First English Euclid
      George Bruce Halsted
      American Journal of Mathematics, Vol. 2, No. 1. (Mar., 1879), pp. 46-
      48.

      The First English Euclid
      Walter F. Shenton
      The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 35, No. 10. (Dec., 1928), pp.
      505-512.
      NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.

      "Good Fences Make Good Neighbors": Geography as Self-Definition in
      Early Modern England
      Lesley B. Cormack
      Isis, Vol. 82, No. 4. (Dec., 1991), pp. 639-661.

      The Teaching of Elementary Geometry in the Seventeenth Century
      L. C. Karpinski; F. W. Kokomoor
      Isis, Vol. 10, No. 1. (Mar., 1928), pp. 21-32.

      Uncovering the Arundel Library at the Royal Society: Changing
      Meanings of Science and the Fate of the Norfolk Donation
      Linda Levy Peck
      Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 52, No. 1.
      (Jan., 1998), pp. 3-24.
      NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.

      Technology and Alchemical Debate in the Late Middle Ages
      William Newman
      Isis, Vol. 80, No. 3. (Sep., 1989), pp. 423-445.

      The Devil in Restoration Science: The Glanvill-Webster Witchcraft
      Debate
      Thomas Harmon Jobe
      Isis, Vol. 72, No. 3. (Sep., 1981), pp. 342-356.

      The Numerological Approach to Cosmic Order during the English
      Renaissance
      C. A. Patrides
      Isis, Vol. 49, No. 4. (Dec., 1958), pp. 391-397.

      Terrestrial Magnetism: For the Glory of God and the Benefit of
      Mankind (in Instruments & Audience)
      Deborah Warner
      Osiris, 2nd Series, Vol. 9, Instruments. (1994), pp. 66-84.

      The Libraries of Newton, Hooke and Boyle
      H. A. Feisenberger
      Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 21, No. 1.
      (Jun., 1966), pp. 42-55.

      Maestlin's Teaching of Copernicus: The Evidence of His University
      Textbook and Disputations
      Charlotte Methuen
      Isis, Vol. 87, No. 2. (Jun., 1996), pp. 230-247.

      Surfaces with Orthogonal Families of Circles
      Thomas Ivey
      Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 123, No. 3.
      (Mar., 1995), pp. 865-872.

      A Conversation with Don Knuth: Part 2 (in Computers and Calculators)
      Donald J. Albers; Lynn Arthur Steen; Don Knuth
      The Two-Year College Mathematics Journal, Vol. 13, No. 2. (Mar.,
      1982), pp. 128-141.

      An Index of Proper Names in Thomas Birch, 'The History of the Royal
      Society' (London, 1756-1757)
      Gail Ewald Scala
      Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 28, No. 2.
      (Apr., 1974), pp. 263-329.

      J. Clerk Maxwell on the History of the Kinetic Theory of Gases, 1871
      Henry T. Bernstein
      Isis, Vol. 54, No. 2. (Jun., 1963), pp. 206-216.

      The First Explanation of Decimal Fractions and Measures (1585).
      Together with a History of the Decimal Idea and a Facsimile (No.
      XVII) of Stevin's Disme
      George Sarton
      Isis, Vol. 23, No. 1. (Jun., 1935), pp. 153-244.
      NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.

      On Kellogg's Diophantine Problem
      D. R. Curtiss
      The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 29, No. 10. (Nov. - Dec.,
      1922), pp. 380-387.

      The History of Zeno's Arguments on Motion: Phases in the Development
      of the Theory of Limits
      Florian Cajori
      The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 22, No. 3. (Mar., 1915), pp.
      77-82.
    • Terri Burns
      ... Dee ... title ... Actually, the whole thing is on-line in .pdf format at http://www.lcc.gatech.edu/~knoespel/HTS2081A/pdfs/Dee_Preface I ll also put this
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 24, 2004
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        --- In AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee@yahoogroups.com, "Terri Burns"
        <burnst@u...> wrote:
        >
        > Greetings-- for any of you who are interested, I've been going
        > through a couple of databases trying to pull out articles on John
        Dee
        > and Euclid (since Dee wrote the preface to the first English
        > translation of Euclid's elements, in 1570-- a fascimile of the
        title
        > page is on-line at
        > http://www.envf.port.ac.uk/illustration/z/per/cmullen/035.HTM)
        >

        Actually, the whole thing is on-line in .pdf format at

        http://www.lcc.gatech.edu/~knoespel/HTS2081A/pdfs/Dee_Preface

        I'll also put this up on our list of links.

        LVX,

        Terri
      • Aaron@Leitch.net
        If there is room, I sure want to see them all. :):):) LVX Aaron
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 24, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          If there is room, I sure want to see them all. :):):)

          LVX
          Aaron

          On 24 Nov 2004 at 17:28, Terri Burns wrote:

          >
          >
          > Greetings-- for any of you who are interested, I've been going
          > through a couple of databases trying to pull out articles on John Dee
          > and Euclid (since Dee wrote the preface to the first English
          > translation of Euclid's elements, in 1570-- a fascimile of the title
          > page is on-line at
          > http://www.envf.port.ac.uk/illustration/z/per/cmullen/035.HTM)
          >
          > If anyone is interested in any of these, I can post them in .pdf form
          > to the files section.
          >
          > Commandino, John Dee, and the De superficierum Divisionibus of
          > Machometus Bagdedinus (in Notes & Correspondence)
          > Paul Lawrence Rose
          > Isis, Vol. 63, No. 1. (Mar., 1972), pp. 88-93.
          >
          > The First Translation of Euclid's Elements into English and its
          > Source
          > R. C. Archibald
          > The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 57, No. 7. (Aug. - Sep.,
          > 1950), pp. 443-452.
          >
          > The Distinctive Features of Seventeenth Century Geometry
          > F. W. Kokomoor
          > Isis, Vol. 10, No. 2. (Jun., 1928), pp. 367-415.
          >
          > Astrology in Shakespeare's Day
          > Carroll Camden, Jr.
          > Isis, Vol. 19, No. 1. (Apr., 1933), pp. 26-73.
          >
          > The Early Editions of Robert Recorde's Ground of Artes
          > Joy B. Easton
          > Isis, Vol. 58, No. 4. (Winter, 1967), pp. 515-532.
          >
          > The Scientific Literature Transmitted through the Incunabula
          > George Sarton
          > Osiris, Vol. 5. (1938), pp. 41-123+125-245.
          > NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.
          >
          > The Scientific Spirit in England in Early Modern Times (c. 1600)
          > Raymond Phineas Stearns Isis, Vol. 34, No. 4. (Spring, 1943), pp.
          > 293-300.
          >
          > Witelo and Thirteenth-Century Mathematics: An Assessment of His
          > Contributions
          > Sabetai Unguru
          > Isis, Vol. 63, No. 4. (Dec., 1972), pp. 496-508.
          >
          > Note on the First English Euclid
          > George Bruce Halsted
          > American Journal of Mathematics, Vol. 2, No. 1. (Mar., 1879), pp. 46-
          > 48.
          >
          > The First English Euclid
          > Walter F. Shenton
          > The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 35, No. 10. (Dec., 1928), pp.
          > 505-512. NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.
          >
          > "Good Fences Make Good Neighbors": Geography as Self-Definition in
          > Early Modern England Lesley B. Cormack Isis, Vol. 82, No. 4. (Dec.,
          > 1991), pp. 639-661.
          >
          > The Teaching of Elementary Geometry in the Seventeenth Century
          > L. C. Karpinski; F. W. Kokomoor
          > Isis, Vol. 10, No. 1. (Mar., 1928), pp. 21-32.
          >
          > Uncovering the Arundel Library at the Royal Society: Changing
          > Meanings of Science and the Fate of the Norfolk Donation
          > Linda Levy Peck
          > Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 52, No. 1.
          > (Jan., 1998), pp. 3-24. NOTE: This article contains high-quality
          > images.
          >
          > Technology and Alchemical Debate in the Late Middle Ages
          > William Newman
          > Isis, Vol. 80, No. 3. (Sep., 1989), pp. 423-445.
          >
          > The Devil in Restoration Science: The Glanvill-Webster Witchcraft
          > Debate Thomas Harmon Jobe Isis, Vol. 72, No. 3. (Sep., 1981), pp.
          > 342-356.
          >
          > The Numerological Approach to Cosmic Order during the English
          > Renaissance
          > C. A. Patrides
          > Isis, Vol. 49, No. 4. (Dec., 1958), pp. 391-397.
          >
          > Terrestrial Magnetism: For the Glory of God and the Benefit of
          > Mankind (in Instruments & Audience)
          > Deborah Warner
          > Osiris, 2nd Series, Vol. 9, Instruments. (1994), pp. 66-84.
          >
          > The Libraries of Newton, Hooke and Boyle
          > H. A. Feisenberger
          > Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 21, No. 1.
          > (Jun., 1966), pp. 42-55.
          >
          > Maestlin's Teaching of Copernicus: The Evidence of His University
          > Textbook and Disputations Charlotte Methuen Isis, Vol. 87, No. 2.
          > (Jun., 1996), pp. 230-247.
          >
          > Surfaces with Orthogonal Families of Circles
          > Thomas Ivey
          > Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 123, No. 3.
          > (Mar., 1995), pp. 865-872.
          >
          > A Conversation with Don Knuth: Part 2 (in Computers and Calculators)
          > Donald J. Albers; Lynn Arthur Steen; Don Knuth The Two-Year College
          > Mathematics Journal, Vol. 13, No. 2. (Mar., 1982), pp. 128-141.
          >
          > An Index of Proper Names in Thomas Birch, 'The History of the Royal
          > Society' (London, 1756-1757) Gail Ewald Scala Notes and Records of the
          > Royal Society of London, Vol. 28, No. 2. (Apr., 1974), pp. 263-329.
          >
          > J. Clerk Maxwell on the History of the Kinetic Theory of Gases, 1871
          > Henry T. Bernstein Isis, Vol. 54, No. 2. (Jun., 1963), pp. 206-216.
          >
          > The First Explanation of Decimal Fractions and Measures (1585).
          > Together with a History of the Decimal Idea and a Facsimile (No. XVII)
          > of Stevin's Disme George Sarton Isis, Vol. 23, No. 1. (Jun., 1935),
          > pp. 153-244. NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.
          >
          > On Kellogg's Diophantine Problem
          > D. R. Curtiss
          > The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 29, No. 10. (Nov. - Dec.,
          > 1922), pp. 380-387.
          >
          > The History of Zeno's Arguments on Motion: Phases in the Development
          > of the Theory of Limits Florian Cajori The American Mathematical
          > Monthly, Vol. 22, No. 3. (Mar., 1915), pp. 77-82.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          > --------------------~--> Make a clean sweep of pop-up ads. Yahoo!
          > Companion Toolbar. Now with Pop-Up Blocker. Get it for free!
          > http://us.click.yahoo.com/L5YrjA/eSIIAA/yQLSAA/I3dslB/TM
          > --------------------------------------------------------------------~-
          > >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Aaron@Leitch.net
          I d love to see anything you can squeeze into the files section. :):):) LVX Aaron
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 24, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            I'd love to see anything you can squeeze into the
            files section. :):):)

            LVX
            Aaron

            On 24 Nov 2004 at 17:28, Terri Burns wrote:

            >
            >
            > Greetings-- for any of you who are interested, I've been going
            > through a couple of databases trying to pull out articles on John Dee
            > and Euclid (since Dee wrote the preface to the first English
            > translation of Euclid's elements, in 1570-- a fascimile of the title
            > page is on-line at
            > http://www.envf.port.ac.uk/illustration/z/per/cmullen/035.HTM)
            >
            > If anyone is interested in any of these, I can post them in .pdf form
            > to the files section.
            >
            > Commandino, John Dee, and the De superficierum Divisionibus of
            > Machometus Bagdedinus (in Notes & Correspondence)
            > Paul Lawrence Rose
            > Isis, Vol. 63, No. 1. (Mar., 1972), pp. 88-93.
            >
            > The First Translation of Euclid's Elements into English and its
            > Source
            > R. C. Archibald
            > The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 57, No. 7. (Aug. - Sep.,
            > 1950), pp. 443-452.
            >
            > The Distinctive Features of Seventeenth Century Geometry
            > F. W. Kokomoor
            > Isis, Vol. 10, No. 2. (Jun., 1928), pp. 367-415.
            >
            > Astrology in Shakespeare's Day
            > Carroll Camden, Jr.
            > Isis, Vol. 19, No. 1. (Apr., 1933), pp. 26-73.
            >
            > The Early Editions of Robert Recorde's Ground of Artes
            > Joy B. Easton
            > Isis, Vol. 58, No. 4. (Winter, 1967), pp. 515-532.
            >
            > The Scientific Literature Transmitted through the Incunabula
            > George Sarton
            > Osiris, Vol. 5. (1938), pp. 41-123+125-245.
            > NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.
            >
            > The Scientific Spirit in England in Early Modern Times (c. 1600)
            > Raymond Phineas Stearns Isis, Vol. 34, No. 4. (Spring, 1943), pp.
            > 293-300.
            >
            > Witelo and Thirteenth-Century Mathematics: An Assessment of His
            > Contributions
            > Sabetai Unguru
            > Isis, Vol. 63, No. 4. (Dec., 1972), pp. 496-508.
            >
            > Note on the First English Euclid
            > George Bruce Halsted
            > American Journal of Mathematics, Vol. 2, No. 1. (Mar., 1879), pp. 46-
            > 48.
            >
            > The First English Euclid
            > Walter F. Shenton
            > The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 35, No. 10. (Dec., 1928), pp.
            > 505-512. NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.
            >
            > "Good Fences Make Good Neighbors": Geography as Self-Definition in
            > Early Modern England Lesley B. Cormack Isis, Vol. 82, No. 4. (Dec.,
            > 1991), pp. 639-661.
            >
            > The Teaching of Elementary Geometry in the Seventeenth Century
            > L. C. Karpinski; F. W. Kokomoor
            > Isis, Vol. 10, No. 1. (Mar., 1928), pp. 21-32.
            >
            > Uncovering the Arundel Library at the Royal Society: Changing
            > Meanings of Science and the Fate of the Norfolk Donation
            > Linda Levy Peck
            > Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 52, No. 1.
            > (Jan., 1998), pp. 3-24. NOTE: This article contains high-quality
            > images.
            >
            > Technology and Alchemical Debate in the Late Middle Ages
            > William Newman
            > Isis, Vol. 80, No. 3. (Sep., 1989), pp. 423-445.
            >
            > The Devil in Restoration Science: The Glanvill-Webster Witchcraft
            > Debate Thomas Harmon Jobe Isis, Vol. 72, No. 3. (Sep., 1981), pp.
            > 342-356.
            >
            > The Numerological Approach to Cosmic Order during the English
            > Renaissance
            > C. A. Patrides
            > Isis, Vol. 49, No. 4. (Dec., 1958), pp. 391-397.
            >
            > Terrestrial Magnetism: For the Glory of God and the Benefit of
            > Mankind (in Instruments & Audience)
            > Deborah Warner
            > Osiris, 2nd Series, Vol. 9, Instruments. (1994), pp. 66-84.
            >
            > The Libraries of Newton, Hooke and Boyle
            > H. A. Feisenberger
            > Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 21, No. 1.
            > (Jun., 1966), pp. 42-55.
            >
            > Maestlin's Teaching of Copernicus: The Evidence of His University
            > Textbook and Disputations Charlotte Methuen Isis, Vol. 87, No. 2.
            > (Jun., 1996), pp. 230-247.
            >
            > Surfaces with Orthogonal Families of Circles
            > Thomas Ivey
            > Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 123, No. 3.
            > (Mar., 1995), pp. 865-872.
            >
            > A Conversation with Don Knuth: Part 2 (in Computers and Calculators)
            > Donald J. Albers; Lynn Arthur Steen; Don Knuth The Two-Year College
            > Mathematics Journal, Vol. 13, No. 2. (Mar., 1982), pp. 128-141.
            >
            > An Index of Proper Names in Thomas Birch, 'The History of the Royal
            > Society' (London, 1756-1757) Gail Ewald Scala Notes and Records of the
            > Royal Society of London, Vol. 28, No. 2. (Apr., 1974), pp. 263-329.
            >
            > J. Clerk Maxwell on the History of the Kinetic Theory of Gases, 1871
            > Henry T. Bernstein Isis, Vol. 54, No. 2. (Jun., 1963), pp. 206-216.
            >
            > The First Explanation of Decimal Fractions and Measures (1585).
            > Together with a History of the Decimal Idea and a Facsimile (No. XVII)
            > of Stevin's Disme George Sarton Isis, Vol. 23, No. 1. (Jun., 1935),
            > pp. 153-244. NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.
            >
            > On Kellogg's Diophantine Problem
            > D. R. Curtiss
            > The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 29, No. 10. (Nov. - Dec.,
            > 1922), pp. 380-387.
            >
            > The History of Zeno's Arguments on Motion: Phases in the Development
            > of the Theory of Limits Florian Cajori The American Mathematical
            > Monthly, Vol. 22, No. 3. (Mar., 1915), pp. 77-82.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            > --------------------~--> Make a clean sweep of pop-up ads. Yahoo!
            > Companion Toolbar. Now with Pop-Up Blocker. Get it for free!
            > http://us.click.yahoo.com/L5YrjA/eSIIAA/yQLSAA/I3dslB/TM
            > --------------------------------------------------------------------~-
            > >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Robert Fowler
            ... http://www.envf.port.ac.uk/illustration/z/per/cmullen/035.HTM) ... Thanks for the research and sharing!! Rob
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 24, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              --- Terri Burns <burnst@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              > Greetings-- for any of you who are interested, I've
              > been going
              > through a couple of databases trying to pull out
              > articles on John Dee
              > and Euclid (since Dee wrote the preface to the first
              > English
              > translation of Euclid's elements, in 1570-- a
              > fascimile of the title
              > page is on-line at
              >
              http://www.envf.port.ac.uk/illustration/z/per/cmullen/035.HTM)
              >
              > If anyone is interested in any of these, I can post
              > them in .pdf form
              > to the files section.
              > ...

              I'm interested in this one in particular:

              >
              > The Numerological Approach to Cosmic Order during
              > the English
              > Renaissance
              > C. A. Patrides
              > Isis, Vol. 49, No. 4. (Dec., 1958), pp. 391-397.
              >



              Thanks for the research and sharing!!

              Rob
            • Terri Burns
              ... Well dang, you ve sure given me a Thanksgiving project! I need to summarize them, anyway, so let me see how many I can get up tomorrow, and the ones that
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 24, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee@yahoogroups.com, Aaron@L...
                wrote:
                >
                > If there is room, I sure want to see them all. :):):)
                >
                > LVX
                > Aaron
                >

                Well dang, you've sure given me a Thanksgiving project! I need to
                summarize them, anyway, so let me see how many I can get up tomorrow,
                and the ones that won't fit, I'll post summaries . . . or at worst,
                summaries of why they were the ones worth skipping. ;)

                LVX,

                Terri
              • Terri Burns
                ... My pleasure. I just uploaded it to the files section, though be warned . . . its pretty dry, long on documentation with zero in the way of charm. What
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 24, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee@yahoogroups.com, Robert Fowler
                  <shakasha@L...> wrote:

                  > I'm interested in this one in particular:
                  >
                  > >
                  > > The Numerological Approach to Cosmic Order during
                  > > the English
                  > > Renaissance
                  > > C. A. Patrides
                  > > Isis, Vol. 49, No. 4. (Dec., 1958), pp. 391-397.
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks for the research and sharing!!
                  >
                  > Rob

                  My pleasure. I just uploaded it to the files section, though be
                  warned . . . its pretty dry, long on documentation with zero in the
                  way of charm.

                  What have you been up to lately?

                  Cheers,

                  Terri
                • Robert F
                  ... Little dry maybe, but interesting still. Thanks for putting it up! ... Mostly I have been doin the day-to-day thing, i.e., school and work. What free time
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 24, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > >
                    > > >
                    > > > The Numerological Approach to Cosmic Order during
                    > > > the English
                    > > > Renaissance
                    > > > C. A. Patrides
                    > > > Isis, Vol. 49, No. 4. (Dec., 1958), pp. 391-397.
                    > > >

                    >
                    > My pleasure. I just uploaded it to the files section, though be
                    > warned . . . its pretty dry, long on documentation with zero in the
                    > way of charm.
                    >


                    Little dry maybe, but interesting still.
                    Thanks for putting it up!

                    > What have you been up to lately?
                    >
                    > Cheers,
                    >
                    > Terri
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    Mostly I have been doin' the day-to-day thing, i.e., school and work.
                    What free time I get is used up by catching up on just living.
                    Oh to have the financial freedom to explore fulltime the truly important
                    things.
                    Seems like those of us who care should be on some kind of cosmic payroll. :)

                    Numbers are trying to get my attention,
                    guess I need to do some work with them.
                    Perhaps it's time to apply some knowledge in practical ways.
                    I'm restless you know, trying to save the world and all.
                    Have you had the feeling of knowing you are supposed to be doing something,
                    and knowing that you are not?
                    I think that's where I am lately.
                    Dee is knocking on the door.


                    Rob
                  • Terri Burns
                    ... work. ... important ... payroll. :) ... something, ... I think that s where I ve been the last twenty years of my life . . . trying to do something about
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 26, 2004
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                      --- In AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee@yahoogroups.com, "Robert F"
                      <shakasha@L...> wrote:

                      > Mostly I have been doin' the day-to-day thing, i.e., school and
                      work.
                      > What free time I get is used up by catching up on just living.
                      > Oh to have the financial freedom to explore fulltime the truly
                      important
                      > things.
                      > Seems like those of us who care should be on some kind of cosmic
                      payroll. :)
                      >
                      > Numbers are trying to get my attention,
                      > guess I need to do some work with them.
                      > Perhaps it's time to apply some knowledge in practical ways.
                      > I'm restless you know, trying to save the world and all.
                      > Have you had the feeling of knowing you are supposed to be doing
                      something,
                      > and knowing that you are not?
                      > I think that's where I am lately.
                      > Dee is knocking on the door.
                      >

                      I think that's where I've been the last twenty years of my life . . .
                      trying to do something about it now!

                      Have you made any changes to your Light-of-Truth web-site lately?
                      Our disagreements about Bacon aside, I think your arguments there
                      (about the connection to Dee in Shakespeare's sonnets) is right on.
                      I hope you post more as you get the chance!

                      I'm still sifting through articles, but have posted a few more in the
                      files sections-- one in particular fascinates me, the one with the
                      less-that-fascinating title, "Commandino, John Dee, and the De
                      superficierum Divisionibus of Machometus Bagdedinus." It looks at
                      another geometry book--the De superficierum Divisionibus of
                      Machometus Bagdedinus-- , published in Pesaro in 1570, as a
                      collaboration of "John Dee of London" and "Federico Commandino of
                      Urbino." It came up on my Euclid search because Dee was inclined to
                      trace the geometry in this work to Euclid rather than to the Arab
                      geometer who actually did it, likely for reasons of both self-
                      protection and and as part of the revival of Greek mathematics.

                      Interesting partly because it is referring to books now lost, likely
                      when the London mob plundered Dee's home, and also because of the
                      dates when Dee would have been in Urbino and Venice, likely the mid
                      1560s. (We know he copied the original documents on "midsummer" in
                      Urbino, possibly as part of the same trip which took him to Venice
                      and Padua in November and December 1563.) Think of the role some of
                      these places play in Shakespeare's plays, and of the famous "novel"
                      concerning sacred geometry published in Venice a generation or two
                      before, and you'll no doubt see my interest.

                      Cheers,

                      Terri
                    • Terri Burns
                      ... Well, all of those won t fit, but I m slowly working my way down the list. From that group of citations I posted before, here are the ones I have, or
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 26, 2004
                      • 0 Attachment
                        --- In AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee@yahoogroups.com, Aaron@L...
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > I'd love to see anything you can squeeze into the
                        > files section. :):):)
                        >
                        > LVX
                        > Aaron
                        >

                        Well, all of those won't fit, but I'm slowly working my way down the
                        list. From that group of citations I posted before, here are the
                        ones I have, or haven't, put in the files section, and why:

                        JSTORE, seach Math and History of science using Dee and Euclid
                        returns:

                        Commandino, John Dee, and the De superficierum Divisionibus of
                        Machometus Bagdedinus (in Notes & Correspondence)
                        Paul Lawrence Rose
                        Isis, Vol. 63, No. 1. (Mar., 1972), pp. 88-93.


                        As mentioned in my last message, this article looks at the above-
                        named geometry book, published in Pesaro in 1570, as a collaboration
                        of "John Dee or London" and Federico Commandino of Urbino." Dee was
                        inclined to trace the geometry in this work to Euclid rather than to
                        the Arab geometer who actually did it, likely for reasons of both
                        self-protection and and as part of the revival of Greek mathematics.

                        Interesting partly because it is referring to books now lost, likely
                        when the London mob plundered Dee's home, and also because of the
                        dates when Dee would have been in Urbino and Venice, likely the mid
                        1560s. (We know he copied the original documents on "midsummer" in
                        Urbino, possibly as part of the same trip which took him to Venice
                        and Padua in November and December 1563.)

                        Article now posted in files section


                        The First Translation of Euclid's Elements into English and its
                        Source
                        R. C. Archibald
                        The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 57, No. 7. (Aug. - Sep.,
                        1950), pp. 443-452.

                        Now posted in files section.


                        The Distinctive Features of Seventeenth Century Geometry
                        F. W. Kokomoor
                        Isis, Vol. 10, No. 2. (Jun., 1928), pp. 367-415.

                        Good introduction to what "geometry" meant in the 17th century

                        Article now posted in files section


                        Astrology in Shakespeare's Day
                        Carroll Camden, Jr.
                        Isis, Vol. 19, No. 1. (Apr., 1933), pp. 26-73.

                        Did not post, because the belabored thesis is fairly obvious to most
                        of us on this list—that astrology was a "serious" science in
                        Shakespeare's day. Duh. But thanks for sharing, Carroll.


                        The Early Editions of Robert Recorde's Ground of Artes
                        Joy B. Easton
                        Isis, Vol. 58, No. 4. (Winter, 1967), pp. 515-532.

                        Did not upload, because its too dry even for my taste—the "Grounde of
                        Artes" was an arithmetic textbook, and it looks at the polularity of
                        different editions. This most popular, and most complete, was John
                        Dee's "augmented" "edition C," which he also wrote the preface for.
                        Compares what was added to different editions, laboriously.


                        The Scientific Literature Transmitted through the Incunabula
                        George Sarton
                        Osiris, Vol. 5. (1938), pp. 41-123+125-245.
                        NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.

                        Did not upload, though if anyone here is doing research on
                        Incunabula, this 120+ page documewnt is a fascinating resource.
                        Basically, it goes though the Incunabula and lists every single
                        document that could be considered "scientific" which is translated in
                        part, whole, or referred to. If you're interested, e-mail me off-
                        line. Since there are many images, you need a fairly high-
                        resolution .pdf, which would take up the whole files section if I
                        posted it there.


                        The Scientific Spirit in England in Early Modern Times (c. 1600)
                        Raymond Phineas Stearns
                        Isis, Vol. 34, No. 4. (Spring, 1943), pp. 293-300.

                        Dull. Obvious. Did not upload.


                        Witelo and Thirteenth-Century Mathematics: An Assessment of His
                        Contributions
                        Sabetai Unguru
                        Isis, Vol. 63, No. 4. (Dec., 1972), pp. 496-508.

                        Uploaded, though I may take it down when the files section files up.
                        Witelo published a multi-volume book of Optics with extensive
                        mathematical "proofs," and this looks at both his sources and who he
                        influenced. He and Alhazen were supposed to have been the two
                        writers who had the greatest inpact on modern optical theory,
                        influencing writers like Leonardo Da Vinci. Optical texts from 1550
                        to 1650 cite Witelo extensively. Witelo's book on Perspective could
                        be substituted for Euclid at Oxford in the late sixteenth century,
                        and his many works were "used by scientists and philosophers whose
                        main interest did not reside in optics," like John Dee and Tycho
                        Brahe.


                        Note on the First English Euclid
                        George Bruce Halsted
                        American Journal of Mathematics, Vol. 2, No. 1. (Mar., 1879), pp. 46-
                        48.

                        Not uploaded, as its argument is paraphrased in the article I did
                        upload on the first English Euclid.


                        The First English Euclid
                        Walter F. Shenton
                        The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 35, No. 10. (Dec., 1928), pp.
                        505-512.
                        NOTE: This article contains high-quality images.

                        Not uploaded, as its argument is paraphrased in the article I did
                        upload on the first English Euclid.


                        "Good Fences Make Good Neighbors": Geography as Self-Definition in
                        Early Modern England
                        Lesley B. Cormack
                        Isis, Vol. 82, No. 4. (Dec., 1991), pp. 639-661.

                        Uploaded. Good explanation of how the discipline "geography"
                        developed.


                        The Teaching of Elementary Geometry in the Seventeenth Century
                        L. C. Karpinski; F. W. Kokomoor
                        Isis, Vol. 10, No. 1. (Mar., 1928), pp. 21-32.

                        Uploaded. Another good contextual article.


                        More to come. Oh, and if anyone is interested, these were the
                        journals I searched through:

                        American Journal of Mathematics, American Mathematical Monthly,
                        Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Transactions of the
                        American Mathematical Society, Annals of Mathematics, British Journal
                        for the Philosophy of Science, Econometrica, Isis, Journal of
                        Symbolic Logic, Mathematics Magazine, Mathematics of Computation,
                        Philosophy of Science, Notes and Records of the Royal Society of
                        London, SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, SIAM Journal on
                        Numerical Analysis, SIAM Review, Science Studies, Two-Year College
                        Mathematics Journal, Science, Technology, & Human Values, PSA:
                        Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science
                        Association, Social Studies of Science, Journal of the Society for
                        Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Osiris, 4S Review, Newsletter on
                        Science, Technology, & Human Values, Analyst, College Mathematics
                        Journal, Science & Technology Studies, Journal of the Society for
                        Industrial and Applied Mathematics: Series B, Numerical Analysis,
                        Mathematical Tables and Other Aids to Computation, Journal of the
                        American Mathematical Society, Bulletin of Symbolic Logic,
                        Mathematics News Letter, National Mathematics Magazine, and
                        Newsletter of the Program on Public Conceptions of Science
                      • Robert F
                        ... From: Terri Burns To: Sent: Friday, November 26, 2004 12:40 PM Subject:
                        Message 11 of 13 , Nov 26, 2004
                        • 0 Attachment
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "Terri Burns" <burnst@...>
                          To: <AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Friday, November 26, 2004 12:40 PM
                          Subject: [AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee] Re: Dee, Euclid. and Arab
                          Geometers


                          >
                          > > Dee is knocking on the door.
                          > >
                          >
                          > I think that's where I've been the last twenty years of my life . . .
                          > trying to do something about it now!
                          >

                          Great!

                          > Have you made any changes to your Light-of-Truth web-site lately?

                          A little tinkering here and there. Nothing much.
                          I did add a piece that relates the Pyramid to 911.
                          I had intentional left it off the site until this summer.

                          http://www.light-of-truth.com/Freemasonry/Bacon911.htm

                          It's hard to bring it up without some people getting upset.
                          I'm not trying to stir up anything, but there is a connection I am certain.
                          Dee's Table which is represented by the Pyramid was a time map for the New
                          Atlantis.
                          Which brings us to:

                          > Our disagreements about Bacon aside, I think your arguments there
                          > (about the connection to Dee in Shakespeare's sonnets) is right on.

                          It's OK to disagree. :)
                          I may be wrong about Francis Bacon being William Tudor.

                          All I knew about Dee when this story came to me was that he was Elizabeth's
                          "astrologer",
                          and that "Prospero" might be a reference to him.
                          I had made a Tree-of-Life design using cabalistic number methods and was
                          meditating on it.
                          I saw a diamond shape and for some reason saw the words come from it, "D, I
                          am 'on D" (diamond).
                          You know, "Dee, I am John Dee".
                          So I asked Dee to "show me something."
                          Over the next couple hours I watched the Bacon/Dee story unfold in my mind.
                          "William Tudor", "Francis Bacon", and "Shakespeare", all number ciphers of
                          each other.
                          "Three in one" as written about in the Sonnets.
                          My imagination? Could be.

                          Then as I began to learn of Dee I saw how he did use numbers to create
                          names.
                          Plus he did other number work in the way that I had been.

                          So basically everything seemed to "add up."

                          > I hope you post more as you get the chance!
                          >
                          > I'm still sifting through articles, but have posted a few more in the
                          > files sections-- one in particular fascinates me, the one with the
                          > less-that-fascinating title, "Commandino, John Dee, and the De
                          > superficierum Divisionibus of Machometus Bagdedinus." It looks at
                          > another geometry book--the De superficierum Divisionibus of
                          > Machometus Bagdedinus-- , published in Pesaro in 1570, as a
                          > collaboration of "John Dee of London" and "Federico Commandino of
                          > Urbino." It came up on my Euclid search because Dee was inclined to
                          > trace the geometry in this work to Euclid rather than to the Arab
                          > geometer who actually did it, likely for reasons of both self-
                          > protection and and as part of the revival of Greek mathematics.
                          >
                          > Interesting partly because it is referring to books now lost, likely
                          > when the London mob plundered Dee's home, and also because of the
                          > dates when Dee would have been in Urbino and Venice, likely the mid
                          > 1560s. (We know he copied the original documents on "midsummer" in
                          > Urbino, possibly as part of the same trip which took him to Venice
                          > and Padua in November and December 1563.) Think of the role some of
                          > these places play in Shakespeare's plays, and of the famous "novel"
                          > concerning sacred geometry published in Venice a generation or two
                          > before, and you'll no doubt see my interest.
                          >
                          > Cheers,
                          >
                          > Terri
                          >
                          >

                          Monas came out in 1570.
                          The number 157 is key to the work I have done,
                          and is key to the entire Dee/Bacon/Shakespeare connection I see.
                          Thus I am intrigued whenever I see that date come up also.

                          (I work mostly with 157, 287, and 365. So let me know when you see them pop
                          up, OK?)

                          I read the article you posted and it wets my appetite for more.

                          I believe Dee wrote Sonnet 126 to Bacon, by the way.

                          O thou my lovely boy who in thy power,
                          Dost hold Time's fickle glass his fickle hour:
                          Who hast by waning grown, and therein show'st,
                          Thy lovers withering, as thy sweet self grow'st.
                          If Nature (sovereign mistress over wrack)
                          As thou goest onwards still will pluck thee back,
                          She keeps thee to this purpose, that her skill
                          May time disgrace, and wretched minutes kill.
                          Yet fear her O thou minion of her pleasure,
                          She may detain, but not still keep her treasure!
                          Her audit (though delayed) answered must be,
                          And her quietus is to render thee.

                          He comforts Bacon that one day his story will be known.
                          "Audit" hinting at number totals also.

                          The letters: ODWTIASMYSHA
                          add up to 157 Simple and 287 Kaye cipher using the 26 letter alphabet.
                          This is the only Sonnet with that cipher combo.
                          Also only one out of two that do not have 14 lines in them.

                          O = Simple cipher 14 which is the Simple cipher of DEE, plus a circle is a
                          symbol of a "cipher", or zero.
                          D = "Dee"
                          W T I = "WILLIAM TUDOR I" which is 157 Simple and 287 Kaye with the 24
                          letter alphabet.
                          AS
                          MY
                          SHA

                          Deciphered:

                          "William Tudor I as my Shakespeare."

                          Funny thing, the year Bacon was born was 1561.
                          Line 1561 of the Sonnets says,

                          To know my shames and praises from your tongue,

                          TO is 33 Simple cipher, the same as BACON,
                          and it says "To know my sha..."

                          To know my Shakespeare?

                          Perhaps his role in Shakespeare is even more than I realized.
                          I've explored a little in the original KJV and recognize similaritites to
                          Shakespeare.

                          http://dewey.library.upenn.edu/sceti/printedbooksNew/index.cfm?textID=kjbible&PagePosition=1

                          Maybe Dee has a larger role here too??

                          Hey I recognize I'm in the company of scholars and I appreciate being
                          allowed to hang out.
                          I have metaphysical skills and perceptions, and hope I can offer a nugget
                          now and then.
                          Thanks!

                          Rob
                        • Gunnar_Tomasson
                          ... Terri - we may have struck pay-dirt! The Cipher Value of John Dee s title - The Elements of geometrie of the most auncient philosopher Evclide of Megara,
                          Message 12 of 13 , Dec 14, 2004
                          • 0 Attachment
                            --- In AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee@yahoogroups.com, "Terri Burns"
                            <burnst@u...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Greetings-- for any of you who are interested, I've been going
                            > through a couple of databases trying to pull out articles on John Dee
                            > and Euclid (since Dee wrote the preface to the first English
                            > translation of Euclid's elements, in 1570-- a fascimile of the title
                            > page is on-line at
                            > http://www.envf.port.ac.uk/illustration/z/per/cmullen/035.HTM)

                            Terri - we may have struck pay-dirt!

                            The Cipher Value of John Dee's title - The Elements of geometrie of
                            the most auncient philosopher Evclide of Megara, 32975, strongly
                            suggests that Dee equated the precision of Euclidean Geometry with
                            that of 'Hidden Poetry' in the Augustan-Saga-Shakespeare tradition.

                            How so?

                            The title's Cipher Value is mirrored in the Cipher Sum 11359 + 11931 -
                            1000 + 10685 = 32975, where (a) 11359 = Snorri Sturluson, (b) 11931 =
                            The Cipher Key [= the sum of its constituent components, 73 + 116 +
                            225 + 228 + 285 + 325 + 376 + 425 + 449 + 504 + 542 + 569 + 660 + 683
                            + 770 + 821 + 896 + 923 + 949 + 1018 + 1094 = 11931], (c) - 1000 =
                            Darkness, and (d) 10685 = Mr. William Shakespeare.

                            In 'other words', this would equate Snorri Sturluson with Archetypal
                            MAN-Beast of Seventh Day ALIAS Creation in Time and Space or The
                            World, whose essence the ancients held to be NUMEROLOGICAL.

                            While MAN-Beast comes into being in Darkness, the numerology innate in
                            The World causes his 'selfe' to 'vnfold' until, at the End of Time, it
                            is revealed to be 'Mr. William Shakespeare'.

                            Gunnar
                          • Terri Burns
                            Thanks, Gunnar! I m certain Dee did make the equation between the structural precision of Euclidean geometry, perhaps taken from some survival of Pythagorean
                            Message 13 of 13 , Dec 15, 2004
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Thanks, Gunnar!

                              I'm certain Dee did make the equation between the structural
                              precision of Euclidean geometry, perhaps taken from some survival of
                              Pythagorean mystery schools, and the structural precision and hidden
                              meanings he wanted to convey, and that he was part of a group that
                              used the same system.

                              My question is whether he--or Shakespeare--would have had access to
                              the cipher key you are talking about, and if they did, where they
                              would have learned it. Are you positing a mystery school tradition
                              that survived in Iceland, and perhaps a few other places like
                              (perhaps) Ireland and the south of France, which was largely wiped
                              out elsewhere?

                              Terri

                              --- In
                              AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee@yahoogroups.com, "Gunnar_Tomasson"
                              <gunnar.tomasson@v...> wrote:
                              >
                              > --- In AlchemistRoyalAdvisorDrJohnDee@yahoogroups.com, "Terri
                              Burns"
                              > <burnst@u...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Greetings-- for any of you who are interested, I've been going
                              > > through a couple of databases trying to pull out articles on
                              John Dee
                              > > and Euclid (since Dee wrote the preface to the first English
                              > > translation of Euclid's elements, in 1570-- a fascimile of the
                              title
                              > > page is on-line at
                              > > http://www.envf.port.ac.uk/illustration/z/per/cmullen/035.HTM)
                              >
                              > Terri - we may have struck pay-dirt!
                              >
                              > The Cipher Value of John Dee's title - The Elements of geometrie of
                              > the most auncient philosopher Evclide of Megara, 32975, strongly
                              > suggests that Dee equated the precision of Euclidean Geometry with
                              > that of 'Hidden Poetry' in the Augustan-Saga-Shakespeare tradition.
                              >
                              > How so?
                              >
                              > The title's Cipher Value is mirrored in the Cipher Sum 11359 +
                              11931 -
                              > 1000 + 10685 = 32975, where (a) 11359 = Snorri Sturluson, (b)
                              11931 =
                              > The Cipher Key [= the sum of its constituent components, 73 + 116 +
                              > 225 + 228 + 285 + 325 + 376 + 425 + 449 + 504 + 542 + 569 + 660 +
                              683
                              > + 770 + 821 + 896 + 923 + 949 + 1018 + 1094 = 11931], (c) - 1000 =
                              > Darkness, and (d) 10685 = Mr. William Shakespeare.
                              >
                              > In 'other words', this would equate Snorri Sturluson with
                              Archetypal
                              > MAN-Beast of Seventh Day ALIAS Creation in Time and Space or The
                              > World, whose essence the ancients held to be NUMEROLOGICAL.
                              >
                              > While MAN-Beast comes into being in Darkness, the numerology
                              innate in
                              > The World causes his 'selfe' to 'vnfold' until, at the End of
                              Time, it
                              > is revealed to be 'Mr. William Shakespeare'.
                              >
                              > Gunnar
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