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yeast starters

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  • Chris Alexander <tripcityusa@yahoo.com>
    got this information and thought i´d pass it on. from George Clayton Cone of Lallemond, producers of Lalvin yeasts: Add yeast to 1/2 cup 105 degF tap water.
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 3, 2003
      got this information and thought i´d pass it on.

      from George Clayton Cone of Lallemond, producers of Lalvin yeasts:

      Add yeast to 1/2 cup 105 degF tap water. attemperate w in 10 degF of
      wort. add 1/4 cup of wort. If acidic, ie: grapes or fruit, add
      another 1/4 cup wort every 4-12 hrs untill pitched. This method can
      reduce stuck fermentations from sprays, toxins and excessive SO2, etc.

      http://winemaking.jackkelleer.net/strains.asp

      Also info from lalvin. EC1118 has temp tolerance from 39 degF to 95
      degF. My yeast seems to be working @ 78-80 degF here, as days are in
      the mid 90´s

      .......................................................Chris
    • Robert N
      I am currently using the K1-V1116 yeast strain, I find it has a wider tolerance to temperature variations, (10 oC to 35oC) and will ferment out to at least
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 3, 2003

        I am currently using the K1-V1116 yeast strain, I find it has a wider tolerance to temperature variations, (10 oC to 35oC) and will ferment out to at least 18%ABV. The ambient temperature here on Saturday was 35oC with 95% humidity, Yuk! I managed to keep the mash temperature down to 36oC. Hopefully things will work out.

         

        Yours in Spirit

         

         

        Robert

         

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Chris Alexander <tripcityusa@...> [mailto:tripcityusa@...]
        Sent
        :
        Tuesday, March 04, 2003 10:44 AM
        To:
        Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [
        Distillers] yeast starters

         


        got this information and thought i´d pass it on.

        from George Clayton Cone of Lallemond, producers of Lalvin yeasts:

        Add yeast to 1/2 cup 105 degF tap water. attemperate w in 10 degF of
        wort. add 1/4 cup of wort. If acidic, ie: grapes or fruit, add
        another 1/4 cup wort every 4-12 hrs untill pitched. This method can
        reduce stuck fermentations from sprays, toxins and excessive SO2, etc.

        http://winemaking.jackkelleer.net/strains.asp

        Also info from lalvin. EC1118 has temp tolerance from 39 degF to 95
        degF. My yeast seems to be working @ 78-80 degF here, as days are in
        the mid 90´s

        .......................................................Chris



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      • Mark
        Just curiuos - how many people in this group make a yeast starter prior to pitching? And how long do you let the starter sit before pitching? And, how do you
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 13, 2006
          Just curiuos - how many people in this group make a yeast starter
          prior to pitching? And how long do you let the starter sit before
          pitching?

          And, how do you make the starter?


          Mark
        • Ian Kent
          Hi Mark, I just dump the yeast and sit back. Ian... ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 13, 2006
            Hi Mark,

            I just dump the yeast and sit back.


            Ian...


            On 8/14/06, Mark <markgofast@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Just curiuos - how many people in this group make a yeast starter
            > prior to pitching? And how long do you let the starter sit before
            > pitching?
            >
            > And, how do you make the starter?
            >
            > Mark
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Harry
            ... Are you talking about a true yeast starter, or just re-hydrating a dry yeast? Slainte! regards Harry
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 13, 2006
              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <markgofast@...> wrote:
              >
              > Just curiuos - how many people in this group make a yeast starter
              > prior to pitching? And how long do you let the starter sit before
              > pitching?
              >
              > And, how do you make the starter?
              >
              >
              > Mark
              >



              Are you talking about a true yeast starter, or just re-hydrating a
              dry yeast?


              Slainte!
              regards Harry
            • Link D'Antoni
              Mark, Put me in the not me category. I think the first time that I made wine I made a starter. Not since. Just get the wash in the correct tempature range
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 13, 2006
                Mark,

                Put me in the 'not me' category.

                I think the first time that I made wine I made a
                starter. Not since. Just get the wash in the correct
                tempature range and pitch. For Turbo Yeast I stir
                some.
                And they're off and running... rather reproducing.


                Link



                --- Mark <markgofast@...> wrote:

                > Just curiuos - how many people in this group make a
                > yeast starter
                > prior to pitching? And how long do you let the
                > starter sit before
                > pitching?
                >
                > And, how do you make the starter?
                >
                >
                > Mark
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >


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              • donald holcombe
                Ive tried it either way. Hydrated ,Orange juice, Cooled Wort, and Grape juice. It doesnt seem to make a differance in a 5 gal batch. I try to warm a liquid
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 13, 2006
                  Ive tried it either way. Hydrated ,Orange juice, Cooled Wort, and Grape juice. It doesnt seem to make a differance in a 5 gal batch. I try to warm a liquid yeast to the wort temp like the stout I just pitched.In my extracts I dump the dry yeast right in the cooled wort.Same with wine.One advantage to hydration or starters is that you get to see if it is viable or dead. A disadvantage is the possability of contamination. Wild yeast are everywhere and they will cross with the yeast in your starter or anything they can eat.Starter help get a large batch get up and going faster.I have started a 50 gal batch with one pack of wine yeast . wemade a 3 gal starter.Worry about ph , oxygenation and nutriants if you need something to worry over. Yeast just want to breed and eat and make alcohal. ?? ! Sounds like some of us dont they !!

                  Mark <markgofast@...> wrote: Just curiuos - how many people in this group make a yeast starter
                  prior to pitching? And how long do you let the starter sit before
                  pitching?

                  And, how do you make the starter?

                  Mark






                  ---------------------------------
                  Get your email and more, right on the new Yahoo.com

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Cary Rhodes
                  I just about always use a starter batch when I make wine. To define starter -- I just rehydrate the yeast in sugar water until it begins, then add some grape
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 14, 2006
                    I just about always use a starter batch when I make wine.

                    To define starter -- I just rehydrate the yeast in sugar water until
                    it begins, then add some grape juice.

                    About a half or 3/4 quart jar full.

                    Then add this to the batch the next day.

                    When making corn mash, I just get the temp right and toss the yeast
                    in the fermenter. Never missed.

                    cary






                    --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, donald holcombe
                    <blackledge_02@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Ive tried it either way. Hydrated ,Orange juice, Cooled Wort, and
                    Grape juice. It doesnt seem to make a differance in a 5 gal batch. I
                    try to warm a liquid yeast to the wort temp like the stout I just
                    pitched.In my extracts I dump the dry yeast right in the cooled
                    wort.Same with wine.One advantage to hydration or starters is that
                    you get to see if it is viable or dead. A disadvantage is the
                    possability of contamination. Wild yeast are everywhere and they
                    will cross with the yeast in your starter or anything they can
                    eat.Starter help get a large batch get up and going faster.I have
                    started a 50 gal batch with one pack of wine yeast . wemade a 3 gal
                    starter.Worry about ph , oxygenation and nutriants if you need
                    something to worry over. Yeast just want to breed and eat and make
                    alcohal. ?? ! Sounds like some of us dont they !!
                    >
                    > Mark <markgofast@...> wrote: Just curiuos - how many
                    people in this group make a yeast starter
                    > prior to pitching? And how long do you let the starter sit before
                    > pitching?
                    >
                    > And, how do you make the starter?
                    >
                    > Mark
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Get your email and more, right on the new Yahoo.com
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • Mark
                    ... Both or neither. I left it open for comment. I normally do NOT do starters or rehydrations, and just wanted to see what other big batchers did for yeast
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 14, 2006
                      "Mark" <markgofast@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Just curiuos - how many people in this group make a yeast starter
                      >

                      and Harry wrote:
                      > Are you talking about a true yeast starter, or just re-hydrating a
                      > dry yeast?
                      >
                      >
                      Both or neither. I left it open for comment. I normally do NOT do
                      starters or rehydrations, and just wanted to see what other big
                      batchers did for yeast pitching.

                      But recall that I'm the nut that has built 20+ different stills and
                      10+ fermenters. "if it ain't broke - you're not trying hard
                      enough". I'm afraid I'm slipping into a period where I want to
                      learn everything there is to learn about yeast - and I know this
                      group has some seriously smart people that I can learn from.

                      I may be wrong but I was taught that a "true" starter can be as much
                      as 10% of the batch size - typically 5% minimum - and is actually
                      based on cell quantity. Rehydration is just that - waking up the
                      yeast from the freeze dried state.

                      I'm anal on record keeping - and to date I just don't see a
                      statistical difference in the "qty of good drinkable per total $"
                      against the starter / no starter variable. Same for rehydrating -
                      no difference.

                      It's been years since I've had a wild ferment (more of the anal
                      factor on sanatizing) - and I understand that a BIG reason to
                      rehydrate/starter is to minimize the time/opportunity for wild
                      yeasts to gain a foothold.

                      I do see a big time difference using a "starter" of 1 gallon to
                      TOTAL 15 gallon batch size (1G starter, 14G wash). Wash is sugar
                      water 1.090, starter is sugar water 1.050

                      I use 2 pkgs of "turbo" yeast for 15Gallons wash.
                      No starter - bubbling starts 48 - 60 hours after pitch
                      Starter - bubbling starts <12 hours after pitch



                      ... oh geez....i typed a book again.... sorry
                    • Harry
                      ... do ... Hmmm...That s a bit long for a turbo to start. Try making your mash at 30 or 32 degC before pitching. Also watch the temp doesn t fall below 25
                      Message 10 of 11 , Aug 14, 2006
                        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <markgofast@...> wrote:

                        > Both or neither. I left it open for comment. I normally do NOT
                        do
                        > starters or rehydrations, and just wanted to see what other big
                        > batchers did for yeast pitching.
                        >
                        > I use 2 pkgs of "turbo" yeast for 15Gallons wash.
                        > No starter - bubbling starts 48 - 60 hours after pitch
                        > Starter - bubbling starts <12 hours after pitch



                        Hmmm...That's a bit long for a turbo to start. Try making your mash
                        at 30 or 32 degC before pitching. Also watch the temp doesn't fall
                        below 25 degC during fermentation.


                        I make whisky batches on dextrose & malt extract. I also make rums
                        on molasses. In both cases (50 lt ferments) I use dry baker's yeast
                        granules rehydrated thus...
                        1/2 litre warm water, 1/2 litre mash, 100 gms dry yeast in a 10
                        litre bucket. Wait 20 minutes, or if the foam is climbing out of
                        the bucket, whichever is the sooner, then knock down by hand
                        stirring to form a yeast slurry. Pitch yeast, fit lid & airlock, &
                        stand back. Bubbling starts in 15 minutes, & gets pretty violent
                        within 12 hrs, requiring refilling the airlock with fluid.
                        Fermentation is usually over in 5 days, but I give it 3 or 4 days
                        more for a diacetyl rest.


                        Slainte!
                        regards Harry
                      • Mark
                        ... Mark says: My problem is a holdover from lager beer making. From the boil I counterflow chill into the fermenter. Exiting the c flow unit the liquid is
                        Message 11 of 11 , Aug 17, 2006
                          Harry said:

                          > Hmmm...That's a bit long for a turbo to start. Try making your mash
                          > at 30 or 32 degC before pitching.

                          Mark says:
                          My problem is a holdover from lager beer making. From the boil I
                          counterflow chill into the fermenter. Exiting the c'flow unit the
                          liquid is around 15C. I start an aquarium air pump and pitch the
                          yeast. The fermenter has a small electric blanket t'stated to 27C -
                          but it takes about 24hrs to move from 15 to 27.

                          Next run I'll adjust c'flow water to obtain 30C and pitch.

                          Harry, thanks (again)

                          Mark
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