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Re: [Distillers] Re: Reflux condensor - venting to atmosphere

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  • Mike Nixon
    Stevie wrote: Subject: [Distillers] Re: Reflux condensor - venting to atmosphere The design is for a still I intend to build using vapour management with the
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 27 8:58 PM
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      Stevie wrote:
      Subject: [Distillers] Re: Reflux condensor - venting to atmosphere

      The design is for a still I intend to build using vapour management with the reflux condensor above the take off for the product
      condensor. (vapour management - the compleat distiller) Looking at the design which I like, I want to ensure while the still is under
      total reflux, there is not a pressure buildup if their is a water pressure drop in the cooling flow. (have small kiddies that love
      turning taps on etc. or fulling up the pool) Like the carpenter rule measure twice cut once, I would like to have in place a safety backup for all that vapour pressure within the column. (I would hate to upset my good lady by having a nasty accident. While you could say ensure the condensor is oversized a backup measure could be worthwhile if it is better to urr on the side of safety. Wondering if anyone else has designed with this in mind.
      ===========================
      You could insert a wax blow-off as Ludwig suggests, but if you make the original design of VM still then the column and boiler are always vented to atmosphere via the top condenser as the only valve is in the side product arm.  Should there be a water pressure drop in the cooling water supply, all you would get is lots of uncondensed vapor coming out the top.  This safety feature is the main reason why I published that particular design, and not any of the others that were tested that used more than one valve.
      However, if you do decide to use more than one valve to give you control over a wider range of reflux ratios, then you will indeed need some sort of safety valve.  As an alternative to Ludwig's suggestion, you could simply provide a side tube out of the bottom of the column to an ordinary fermentation lock.  For the inventive, a thermistor set in the top of this fermentation lock would detect the presence of hot vapor and could be used to trigger a break relay in the power supply.  The fermentation lock would permit air to enter the system when it cools down so you don't get an implosion.  Incidentally, bottom of the column as this then caters for the possibility that pressurisation is caused by flooding.
       
      Mike N
       
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