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Re: ullage -never trust container sizes

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  • motie_d <motie_d@yahoo.com>
    ... cask ... Perhaps the term you are looking for is Outage ? This refers to the free space left in a container for expansion during shipping. Motie
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 27, 2003
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "danev2 <danev2@y...>"
      <danev2@y...> wrote:
      > Mr Blackout you are wrong
      > From The American heritage dictionary:
      >
      > Ullage (n) The amount of liquid within a container that is lost
      > during shipment or storage, as through leakage. (Middle english:
      > oylage, from Old French: auoillage, from auoiller, to fill up a
      cask
      > to the bunghole; from oeil, eye, bunghole; from latin oculus.
      >
      > In short, the angels portion.
      >
      > Your 20L container that holds 25L is simply the official capacity
      > that the company wants to state.
      > Ever measured a 5 gal bucket? They are hardly ever 5 gal.
      >
      > Have a nice day ;)
      >
      > Dane V
      >


      Perhaps the term you are looking for is 'Outage'? This refers to the
      free space left in a container for expansion during shipping.

      Motie
    • peter_vcb <viciousblackout@yahoo.com>
      Hi Dane, i have seen a few defintions for ullage. thats why i gave 2 in my original post, the one your dictionary uses is not in most dictionarys a quick
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 28, 2003
        Hi Dane,
        i have seen a few defintions for ullage. thats why i gave 2 in my
        original post, the one your dictionary uses is not in most dictionarys
        a quick search for ullage on google get you this

        ULLAGE, com. law. When a cask is gauged, what it wants of being full
        is called ullage.

        ullage (noun) -the amount that a container (as a wine bottle or tank)
        lacks of being full

        Ullage: Empty space above the liquid in a wine bottle. In old wines,
        it's an important indication of quality--the less ullage the better.

        ullage
        SYLLABICATION: ul·lage
        PRONUNCIATION: lj
        NOUN: 1. The amount of liquid within a container that is lost, as by
        leakage, during shipment or storage. 2. The amount by

        which a container, such as a bottle, cask, or tank, falls short of
        being full.
        ETYMOLOGY: Middle English ulage, from Old French ouillage, from
        ouiller, to fill up a cask, from ouil, eye, bunghole, from Latin
        oculus, eye. See okw- in Appendix I.

        ullage // n.
        1 the amount by which a cask etc. falls short of being full.
        2 loss by evaporation or leakage.
        [Middle English from Anglo-French ulliage, Old French ouillage from
        ouiller `fill up', ultimately from Latin oculus `eye', with reference
        to the bung-hole]


        so i am not wrong, neither are you. but your dictionary is sadly
        lacking in its definitions

        Peter



        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "danev2 <danev2@y...>"
        <danev2@y...> wrote:
        > Mr Blackout you are wrong
        > From The American heritage dictionary:
        >
        > Ullage (n) The amount of liquid within a container that is lost
        > during shipment or storage, as through leakage. (Middle english:
        > oylage, from Old French: auoillage, from auoiller, to fill up a
        cask
        > to the bunghole; from oeil, eye, bunghole; from latin oculus.
        >
        > In short, the angels portion.
        >
        > Your 20L container that holds 25L is simply the official capacity
        > that the company wants to state.
        > Ever measured a 5 gal bucket? They are hardly ever 5 gal.
        >
        > Have a nice day ;)
        >
        > Dane V
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harley Daschund"
        > <harley_daschund@h...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Very interesting...thanks for that info...:>)
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > >From: "peter_vcb <viciousblackout@y...>" <
        > > >Subject: [Distillers] ullage -never trust container sizes
        > > >Date: Thu, 27 Feb 2003 13:32:24 -0000
        > > >
        > > >my understanding of the term ullage is the volume left in a
        > container
        > > >when it is filled with the volume stated on it. i have also seen
        it
        > > >described as the amount by which a container falls short of being
        > > >full. so if a 1 gallon jar holds 9 pints if full to the absolute
        > brim
        > > >then the ullage is 1 pint. usually the larger the container the
        > > >larger the ullage. with short wide containers the ullage is a
        large
        > > >percentage of the stated volume. containers have ullage so it is
        > > >easier to pour from them. i recently found a new supply of
        > containers
        > > >at the back of my local diner which had vegetable oil in them. it
        > > >said they only hold 20litres of oil so i wasnt even going to
        bother
        > > >taking them, when i got home i found they easily held 25litres
        with
        > > >about 3 inches of space to spare! the ullage must be about 8-9
        > > >litres. i have a 25litre container with less room at the top
        when
        > 25
        > > >litres is in it. the moral of the story is never trust whats on
        the
        > > >label, carefully measure out your water and mark the side of the
        > > >container.
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > > _________________________________________________________________
        > > The new MSN 8: smart spam protection and 2 months FREE*
        > > http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
      • danev2 <danev2@yahoo.com>
        Yes you could be quite possibly right. You get what you paqy for, mine was free from a departing co-worker He probably scrambled all the words and meanings up
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 28, 2003
          Yes you could be quite possibly right.
          You get what you paqy for, mine was free from a departing co-worker
          He probably scrambled all the words and meanings up as a joke on me.
          Dirty rotten @#$^&*^$

          All in good fun....

          D



          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "peter_vcb <viciousblackout@y...>"
          <viciousblackout@y...> wrote:
          > Hi Dane,
          > i have seen a few defintions for ullage. thats why i gave 2 in my
          > original post, the one your dictionary uses is not in most
          dictionarys
          > a quick search for ullage on google get you this
          >
          > ULLAGE, com. law. When a cask is gauged, what it wants of being
          full
          > is called ullage.
          >
          > ullage (noun) -the amount that a container (as a wine bottle or
          tank)
          > lacks of being full
          >
          > Ullage: Empty space above the liquid in a wine bottle. In old
          wines,
          > it's an important indication of quality--the less ullage the better.
          >
          > ullage
          > SYLLABICATION: ul·lage
          > PRONUNCIATION: lj
          > NOUN: 1. The amount of liquid within a container that is lost, as
          by
          > leakage, during shipment or storage. 2. The amount by
          >
          > which a container, such as a bottle, cask, or tank, falls short of
          > being full.
          > ETYMOLOGY: Middle English ulage, from Old French ouillage, from
          > ouiller, to fill up a cask, from ouil, eye, bunghole, from Latin
          > oculus, eye. See okw- in Appendix I.
          >
          > ullage // n.
          > 1 the amount by which a cask etc. falls short of being full.
          > 2 loss by evaporation or leakage.
          > [Middle English from Anglo-French ulliage, Old French ouillage from
          > ouiller `fill up', ultimately from Latin oculus `eye', with
          reference
          > to the bung-hole]
          >
          >
          > so i am not wrong, neither are you. but your dictionary is sadly
          > lacking in its definitions
          >
          > Peter
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "danev2 <danev2@y...>"
          > <danev2@y...> wrote:
          > > Mr Blackout you are wrong
          > > From The American heritage dictionary:
          > >
          > > Ullage (n) The amount of liquid within a container that is lost
          > > during shipment or storage, as through leakage. (Middle english:
          > > oylage, from Old French: auoillage, from auoiller, to fill up a
          > cask
          > > to the bunghole; from oeil, eye, bunghole; from latin oculus.
          > >
          > > In short, the angels portion.
          > >
          > > Your 20L container that holds 25L is simply the official capacity
          > > that the company wants to state.
          > > Ever measured a 5 gal bucket? They are hardly ever 5 gal.
          > >
          > > Have a nice day ;)
          > >
          > > Dane V
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harley Daschund"
          > > <harley_daschund@h...> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Very interesting...thanks for that info...:>)
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > >From: "peter_vcb <viciousblackout@y...>" <
          > > > >Subject: [Distillers] ullage -never trust container sizes
          > > > >Date: Thu, 27 Feb 2003 13:32:24 -0000
          > > > >
          > > > >my understanding of the term ullage is the volume left in a
          > > container
          > > > >when it is filled with the volume stated on it. i have also
          seen
          > it
          > > > >described as the amount by which a container falls short of
          being
          > > > >full. so if a 1 gallon jar holds 9 pints if full to the
          absolute
          > > brim
          > > > >then the ullage is 1 pint. usually the larger the container the
          > > > >larger the ullage. with short wide containers the ullage is a
          > large
          > > > >percentage of the stated volume. containers have ullage so it
          is
          > > > >easier to pour from them. i recently found a new supply of
          > > containers
          > > > >at the back of my local diner which had vegetable oil in them.
          it
          > > > >said they only hold 20litres of oil so i wasnt even going to
          > bother
          > > > >taking them, when i got home i found they easily held 25litres
          > with
          > > > >about 3 inches of space to spare! the ullage must be about 8-9
          > > > >litres. i have a 25litre container with less room at the top
          > when
          > > 25
          > > > >litres is in it. the moral of the story is never trust whats
          on
          > the
          > > > >label, carefully measure out your water and mark the side of
          the
          > > > >container.
          > > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          _________________________________________________________________
          > > > The new MSN 8: smart spam protection and 2 months FREE*
          > > > http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
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