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Re: [Distillers] Re: "Seed or Sorghum Beer" - request for information

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  • Ludwig
    ... The defination of sorghum or milo is very hard to track down or explain. Sorghum usually refers to the cane varities and the word milo usually refers
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 3, 2003
      > I
      > found one obscure sentence reference buried at the bottom of one
      > webpage that mentioned that Milo grain could be used in the
      > production of ethanol.

      The defination of "sorghum" or "milo" is very hard to track down or
      explain. Sorghum usually refers to the cane varities and the word milo
      usually refers to the grain varities of the same plant family. Some if
      not all varities of milo were produced by using some sorghum varities in
      the past and the volunteer seeds would return back to their parent
      stock in the following year. Their is a over-whelming number of
      different kinds of milo and sorghum varities and combinations of the
      two. Milo is also called maize and so is corn.

      For ethanol production the fuel alcohol people use both corn and milo.
      Some plants only use milo, because it is cheaper to buy and because it
      is more available in their area. Others only use corn. The alcohol
      yield is the same for both or about 2.5 ( plus or minus a little)
      gallons of ethanol for each bushel fermented. It is also basised on what
      they are set up for. No one that I have ever heard of uses wheat. They
      say it likes to foam, not only in the fermenter but also in the
      distillation columns. That it likes to plug things up and is harder to
      clean up after. This is what I have been told by one fuel alcohol
      producer anyway.

      I got some milo from a farmer (free, he just gave it to me) to try and
      make beer out of. Millet is not milo or sorghum. Millet is a crop
      completely in it's own right. Millet seed is smaller than milo seed.
      Milo comes in red, bronz, white, and yellow. All millet I have ever
      seen is white in color with different seed sizes. Their could be other
      but not that I have seen.

      Ludwig
    • CornFed (Randy) <cornfed15@hotmail.com>
      ... Sorghum usually refers to the cane varities and the word milo ... Ludwig Gluten Free Beer http://glutenfreebrewer.com/default.htm This webpage discusses
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 6, 2003
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Ludwig <Bluestar792@n...> wrote:
        Sorghum usually refers to the cane varities and the word milo
        > usually refers to the grain varities of the same plant family. >
        Ludwig


        Gluten Free Beer http://glutenfreebrewer.com/default.htm This
        webpage discusses one man's efforts to produce a beer from gluten
        free grains. He has a alergic reaction to gluten content in grains.
        He lists 'Sorgum grain' as his primary material to work with The
        page is a little on the thin side for content but is interesting just
        the same.
      • Ludwig
        ... Grain sorghums include durra, milo, shallu, kafir, Egyptian corn, great millet, and Indian millet. Sorghum is especially valued in hot and arid regions for
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 6, 2003
          cornfed15@... wrote:

          > and the word milo
          > > usually refers to the grain varities of the same plant family. >
          > Ludwig

          >
          Grain sorghums include durra, milo, shallu, kafir, Egyptian corn, great
          millet, and Indian millet. Sorghum is especially valued in hot and arid
          regions for its resistance to drought and heat.


          This is a quote from the same page. As I said milo usually referrs to
          the grain part of the family. Theis is all kinds of grain sorghum but
          there is also all kinds of sorghum grass or cane. The seed from the
          cane side is very small, black and hard. Nothing you would want to
          grind or ferment for alcohol or beer. The grain from the milo side is
          usually very plump and I think a very good grain for alcohol or beer.

          Their is no one description for sorghum. The cane side would be good if
          crushed and the juice fermented but the milo juice is very bitter. Hard
          to even get a cow to eat it. The cane they like. Their both called
          sorghum something or another. How they are classified is more a
          national description or even a regional description. Here in the US
          their is several different names for milo. Hybred sorghum cane has a
          kernel very much similiar to milo but when it reproduces the grain head
          is so high it would be very difficult to harvest. The yield would also
          be very low. It also likes to return to it's parent stock which is the
          small, hard black kernel. Milo is short so it can be harvested. Older
          varities would also return back to their parent stock, giving rise to
          shatter cane. Grain sorghum is bred to produce grain, Sorghum sudan,
          cane, etc is bred to produce stock. They both do some of each but one
          is far better than they other at what they do

          I have never heard of anybody harvesting sorghum, (grass, sudan, cane,
          etc) for the grain. That's not to say they don't somewhere but theiy
          would be a lot better off planting milo if they do. To each his own.

          I hope this helps everybody concerned to clear this up. It is very hard
          to explain because of the wide variety of names for so many diffeent
          crops. You could call it anything you like, but only you would know
          what you are talking about if you did.
        • Dick
          In message , CornFed (Randy) writes ... My copy of The Homebrewer s Garden (Fisher &
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 7, 2003
            In message <b1uirb+8a0a@...>, "CornFed (Randy)
            <cornfed15@...>" <cornfed15@...> writes
            >--- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Ludwig <Bluestar792@n...> wrote:
            >  Sorghum usually refers to the cane varities and the word milo
            >> usually refers to the grain varities of the same plant family.  >
            >Ludwig
            My copy of The Homebrewer's Garden (Fisher & Fisher) has a short section
            on sorghum (sorghum bicolour). There are apparently four different types
            all producing seeds: grain, sweet, grass & broomcorn (?), only grain &
            sweet are suitable for brewing etc. Sweet sorghum is grown for it's
            stalks which are crushed & boiled down to produce a sweet sap which
            could then be used as a brewing etc. adjunct. Grain sorghum produces, as
            would be expected, grain !! Guinness produced in South Africa uses
            malted sorghum grain as an ingredient.
            Recently went to a talk given by the Head Maltster at our local
            maltings. He initially trained & worked in the Nigerian brewing industry
            before coming to Scotland & talked about the use of sorghum in brewing,
            showing us samples of many different varieties of sorghum grain, all
            sorts of colours & ranging from 1/8" to 1/4" diameter. Malting seems to
            be fairly straight forward but if I remember rightly sorghum malt has to
            be mashed at a higher temperature than barley malt, think it was about
            80 deg C rather than 65-67 deg C but you'd need to check.
            --
            Dick
            Fra' Auld Reekie
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