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Internal Reflux Still: Modification questions

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  • all5n <all5n@yahoo.com>
    I have decided on using the internal reflux design located at http://www.moonshine-still.com/, but i was wondering what adverse effects (if any) would be
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 31, 2002
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      I have decided on using the internal reflux design located at
      http://www.moonshine-still.com/, but i was wondering what adverse
      effects (if any) would be noticed from the following modification:

      Since 2" copper pipe is 40% more expensive than 1.5" copper pipe, i
      want to reduce the pipe diameter dimensions used. This means that
      where 2" pipe is called for i will now use 1.5" pipe, where 1.5"
      pipe is called for i will now use 1" pipe, etc.

      The reflux tubes going through the column will remain .5".

      I think I saw a picture of someone who has done this, but dont
      recall where I saw it.

      What other design modifications are suggested if I choose to go this
      route (i.e. longer column? longer condenser?). Should i do this at
      all, or just bite the bullet and pay the extra $ for the 2" copper.

      Thanks in advance.

      -allan
    • Tony & Elle Ackland
      Allan, ... I d just keep it it at 2 - that way its a well proven diameter, which will work well for a good range of heat sources. 1.5 will work, but it will
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 31, 2002
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        Allan,

        > Should i do this at
        > all, or just bite the bullet and pay the extra $ for the 2" copper.

        I'd just keep it it at 2" - that way its a well proven diameter, which will
        work well for a good range of heat sources. 1.5" will work, but it will
        flood earlier at lower heat inputs, the scrubbers are fiddlier to load &
        need cleaning more often. What I would change is the condensor - theres no
        reason for this to be in a 3" sheath - make it out of 2" as well, and dont
        valve both outlets, only the one that you collect from. Have the return
        back to the column as an overflow with its inlet a little higher than the
        collection one, and hence not needing control. Given that you're only
        planning on building one still, and making it a good one, pay the extra $.
        It will soon repay for itself.

        Tony
      • BillyWeeble@cs.com
        In a message dated 12/31/02 6:14:06 PM Pacific Standard Time, all5n@yahoo.com writes:
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 2, 2003
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          In a message dated 12/31/02 6:14:06 PM Pacific Standard Time, all5n@...
          writes:

          << Should i ... just bite the bullet and pay the extra $ for the 2" copper. >>

          howdy, I built the 2" internal reflux (with the pass thru pipes) and
          have had no problems with it since modifications were added. I used 1 1/2"
          after the turn at the head and 3/4" inside the water jacket condenser. There
          is some disagreement as to the efficiency of this design, but I get 94% about
          every time (unless I hurry it) and would get a higher % if the column was
          longer. I think 3 1/2 feet would work better than my just under 3 feet. I
          took a picture of the modification in progress and have it attached to this
          note. The insulation is now replaced and the lyne arm is pointing the correct
          way. The valves are what's made this still much more effective and easy to
          run. When the head temp rises to 80C I shut it down since all the ethanol has
          left the boiler.
          I do want to build the valved reflux someday to experience the difference
          between the two. I hear it's a better machine.
          Another thing is to recirculate your coolant. It's a real joy to have
          lots of water running thru the condenser and not worry about the water bill
          or the well running dry.
          And don't forget to use Silver Solder. Good luck!
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