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Re: [Distillers] High Gravity Sugar Fermentation

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  • Mike Nixon
    Thanks Smudge! A great recipe, and excellent instructions. I ll be giving that a go. As for Marmite, being a Kiwi I prefer Vegemite :-)) Those poor souls who
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2002
      Thanks Smudge!  A great recipe, and excellent instructions.  I'll be giving that a go.
      As for Marmite, being a Kiwi I prefer Vegemite :-))
      Those poor souls who have never been introduced to the delights of either Marmite or Vegemite can see what they are missing at http://www.gty.org/~phil/marmite.htm
       
      I will never forget the look on the face of my American friend's daughter when she first tried Vegemite!
      Talk about hatred at first sight!!!!!
       
      Mike N

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: smudge311065
      To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, November 02, 2002 9:10 AM
      Subject: [Distillers] High Gravity Sugar Fermentation


      I have found lots of recipes for high-alcohol sugar washes on home
      distillation sites. Most are represented as someone else's recipes,
      but are touted as looking like they should work. They also tend to be
      a little vague in their list of ingredients, referring to things
      like "yeast nutrient".

      I'm sure I'm not the only one who's never had any luck (until
      recently) getting them to work, so I thought I'd share my recipe.

      From experience, its easy to make a brew that will ferment out to
      10%, but to make the effort of distillation worthwhile, you really
      want something closer to 20%. Simply adding more sugar to a basic 10%
      recipe doesn't work, even when using a high-alcohol tolerance yeast.
      They seem to stick with plenty of sugar left.

      While Turbo Yeasts are great, they are expensive (around $9) costing
      more than the sugar itself. My recipe (excluding sugar) costs just
      over $2 for a 25-litre batch, and is a little more in keeping with
      the homebrewing ethos.

      (All prices are in Australian dollars)

      Here's my recipe for a 100 litre wash

      Sugar                        28kg
      Molasses                  2.5kg
      Di-Ammonium Phosphate              175g
      Marmite                          100g
      Yeast – ICV K1116            35g
      Fermaid K                  25g
      Yeast Hulls                  25g
      Magnesium Sulphate            25g
      Baking Soda                  25g
      Tea                         4 cups

      With a 95% conversion efficiency, this much sugar will produce about
      14.5 kg of ethanol which is about 18.5 litres.

      Combine all the ingredients (except the yeast) with warm water so the
      resulting mix is between 35 and 40 degrees. Aerate with an aquarium
      pump and air-stone.

      Rehydrate the yeast as per manufacturer's instructions, and add to
      the brew. (http://consumer.lallemand.com/danstar-
      lalvin/danstarrehyd.html)

      Continue to aerate for 4 hours. Use a thermostatically controlled
      heater to maintain the temp at 25 degrees (once it drops to 25
      degrees).

      I achieve the following fermentation rate:

      Hours        SG
        0      1.110
      12      1.105
      24      1.070
      36      1.040
      48      1.004
      60      0.997
      72      0.990

      It's pretty much all over in three days, with the result best
      described as an unpleasant tasting beer, but containing plenty of
      alcohol.

      A breakdown of the ingredients is as follows:

      Molasses – contains sugars but is mostly included for its vitamin and
      mineral content. The fermentation rate halved when I didn't include
      it. Molasses is a waste product of sugar refining and can be assumed
      to contain bacteria. Do not dilute molasses if you do not intend to
      add yeast immediately as the bacteria will get established. This
      amount of molasses with this yeast does not foam over, despite the
      rapid ferment. Buy it from a stock feed supplier – 25kg for $22

      Di-Ammonium Phosphate – Source of yeast assimilable nitrogen. Its
      need is well documented. About 350mg/L of Nitrogen recommended for
      fermenting this much sugar. This recipe provides 375mg including the
      DAP in the Fermaid K. Buy it from Winery Supplies
      (www.winerysupplies.com.au) 1kg for $8.

      Marmite – Source of B group vitamins. If you don't know what it is
      already, then you probably live in North America and won't be able to
      buy it anyway. Often used in mead recipes. Fermentation sticks when
      not included.

      Yeast ICV K1116 – Produced by Lallemand. Alcohol tolerance listed as
      18%. Buy it from Winery Supplies (www.winerysupplies.com.au) 500g for
      $35. Lallemand (www.lallemandwine.com/products.php) also market a
      range of distillers yeast. Danstil A is claimed to have an alcohol
      tolerance of +20%. According to Lallemand Australia the exact same
      yeast is marketed to winemakers labelled L2226, which is easier to
      obtain. I will try this yeast next. Keep it refrigerated in an
      airtight container.

      Fermaid K – General yeast nutrient, produced by Lallemand. Do a web
      search if you want to know whats in it. Buy it from Winery Supplies
      (www.winerysupplies.com.au) 1kg for $23. Keep it refrigerated.

      Yeast Hulls – General yeast nutrient, prevents stuck fermentations.
      Buy it from Winery Supplies (www.winerysupplies.com.au) 1kg for $23.
      Keep it refrigerated.

      Magnesium Sulphate – Epsom Salts. Source of Magnesium for yeast and
      plants alike. It's need is well documented. Buy it from the
      supermarket/hardware store/chemist.

      Baking Soda – Sodium Bicarbonate. An inexpensive pH buffer, but
      molasses, tea and Marmite may also do the same job. Buy it from the
      supermarket for $6.50 a kg

      Tea – Source of tannin. Often appears in mead recipes. No identified
      role in fermentation, but it occurs in grape juice, so included on
      the basis that it can't do any harm when I was trying everything I
      could think of might help.


      This recipe works, but probably includes excessive amounts of some
      ingredients. The annoyance of a stuck fermentation outweighs the
      likely savings, so I've pretty much stopped experimenting.

      Smudge
    • Mike Nixon
      From: smudge311065 Subject: [Distillers] High Gravity Sugar Fermentation ... and MARMITE!!!!! Hot from Google! http://www.accomodata.co.uk/marmite1.htm You
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 2002
        From: smudge311065
        Subject: [Distillers] High Gravity Sugar Fermentation
        ... and MARMITE!!!!!

        Hot from Google! http://www.accomodata.co.uk/marmite1.htm
        You can get Marmite in the USA, the importer, Liberty, will tell you which
        distributors/stores sell Marmite in the USA . So give them a call and they
        can tell you where you can buy the stuff.

        Liberty Richter
        400 Lyster Avenue
        Saddle Brook
        New Jersey
        07663

        Tel# 201 843 8900
        Fax# 201 368 3575
        Enjoy!
        Mike N
      • andy_galewsky
        You can also order it from the bbc america site - http://www.bbcamerica.com/shop/shop.jsp This is where I go when I get an Airwaves gum jones :) ... you which
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 1, 2002
          You can also order it from the bbc america site -

          http://www.bbcamerica.com/shop/shop.jsp

          This is where I go when I get an Airwaves gum jones :)

          --- In Distillers@y..., "Mike Nixon" <mike@s...> wrote:
          > From: smudge311065
          > Subject: [Distillers] High Gravity Sugar Fermentation
          > ... and MARMITE!!!!!
          >
          > Hot from Google! http://www.accomodata.co.uk/marmite1.htm
          > You can get Marmite in the USA, the importer, Liberty, will tell
          you which
          > distributors/stores sell Marmite in the USA . So give them a call
          and they
          > can tell you where you can buy the stuff.
          >
          > Liberty Richter
          > 400 Lyster Avenue
          > Saddle Brook
          > New Jersey
          > 07663
          >
          > Tel# 201 843 8900
          > Fax# 201 368 3575
          > Enjoy!
          > Mike N
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