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Cleaning Stainless Steel

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  • ogzo46
    Hi guys, I want to know what is the best way to clean stainless steel, I think caustic soda is used in wineries etc, but I don t like the thought of caustic
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 14, 2002
      Hi guys,
      I want to know what is the best way to clean stainless steel,
      I think caustic soda is used in wineries etc, but I don't like the
      thought of caustic burns! Also, when you guys with big stills, like
      20lts plus do a run, how do you know when the boiler is getting low
      because I can see a saftey issue here and internal elements seem more
      risky than a naked flame outside the boiler, and alcohol fires are
      easier to put out with water, arn't they?
      Regards Eric Oz
    • lapsnuit
      I have measured that my still requires a minumum of 10 liters to be safe. I want the element covered and on top with minimum 5 centimeter of fluid. If I fill
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 14, 2002
        I have measured that my still requires a minumum of 10 liters to be
        safe. I want the element covered and on top with minimum 5
        centimeter of fluid. If I fill it with a wash of 20 liter from lets
        say 20% there will be about 15.5 liter left, more then enough. It's
        also important to know how many liters you have harvested yet. Not
        only for this reason but also to know whereabout you are in the run,
        (middle, near the end etc). I also have stainless steel still and
        clean in with sulfiet powder (sulphite ?) it's a strong
        antibacterial cleaner.
        Need to rinse with a lot a warm water afterwards. No damage to still
        by this stuff.

        Cheers


        --- In Distillers@y..., "ogzo46" <ericoz@b...> wrote:
        > Hi guys,
        > I want to know what is the best way to clean stainless
        steel,
        > I think caustic soda is used in wineries etc, but I don't like the
        > thought of caustic burns! Also, when you guys with big stills,
        like
        > 20lts plus do a run, how do you know when the boiler is getting
        low
        > because I can see a saftey issue here and internal elements seem
        more
        > risky than a naked flame outside the boiler, and alcohol fires are
        > easier to put out with water, arn't they?
        > Regards Eric Oz
      • BOKAKOB
        Eric, I use stainless steel scrubber on my boiler s stainless steel parts. Then I use nylon scrubbers on the copper parts. To dissolve things I use a barrage
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 14, 2002

          Eric,

          I use stainless steel scrubber on my boiler's stainless steel parts. Then I use nylon scrubbers on the copper parts. To dissolve things I use a barrage of solvents not in any particular order - acetone, paint thinner, alcohol, ammonia, vinegar. After that there is a vigorous flash with water.

          You should monitor your output constantly (at a frequency say every 200 mL) You will know that your production of alcohol is slownig at the end. It means that you are not getting 80-95% anymore and it gets to 40-45% -- this is the time to stop. When you evaporate alcohol almost all water should stay back in the pot. If you have 20L to start with at concentration 12% it means that you have 2.4 L of pure alcohol and 17.6 L of pure water in your mix (it is strictly for example - real life is a bit different). Boilng most of alcohol out leaves you approximately with 17 L of hot stinking water back in the pot. If you get carried away with boiling out water -- then it is a problem.

          A few careful monitored runs will give you a feeling about it -- just do it.

          Cheers, Alex...

           ogzo46 wrote:

          Hi guys,
                  I want to know what is the best way to clean stainless steel,
          I think caustic soda is used in wineries etc, but I don't like the
          thought of caustic burns! Also, when you guys with big stills, like
          20lts plus do a run, how do you know when the boiler is getting low
          because I can see a saftey issue here and internal elements seem more
          risky than a naked flame outside the boiler, and alcohol fires are
          easier to put out with water, arn't they?
                                               Regards Eric Oz



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        • Zeke Jones
          Unless the wash is one of very high ABV(90% or so,not attainable by normal fermentation) or ,in the case of an internal electric heating element where the
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 14, 2002

            Unless the wash is one of very high ABV(90% or so,not attainable by normal fermentation) or ,in the case of  an internal electric heating element where the element is located too high within the boiler, the alcohol will be depleted long before the boiler goes dry...:>)

            ....also,water will simply spread an alcohol fire....you should keep a 'Type B' fire extinguisher on hand as this will displace the oxygen needed to keep the alcohol burning...:>)

            >From: "ogzo46"
            >
            >Hi guys,
            >thought of caustic burns! Also, when you guys with big stills, like
            >20lts plus do a run, how do you know when the boiler is getting low
            >because I can see a saftey issue here and internal elements seem more
            >risky than a naked flame outside the boiler, and alcohol fires are
            >easier to put out with water, arn't they?
            > Regards Eric Oz
            >


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          • goyeast
            If you re willing to scrub by hand, I suggest using Bar Keepers Friend (www.barkeepersfriend.com). It contains oxalic acid and works great on stainless
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 3, 2002
              If you're willing to scrub by hand, I suggest using "Bar Keepers
              Friend" (www.barkeepersfriend.com). It contains oxalic acid and
              works great on stainless steel and coppper (don't use it on
              aluminum). I've found it especially helpful for removing stains and
              burned food on my cookware. It leaves a nice polish too.

              As far as your elements go, just subtract the maximum theoretical
              yield of alcohol in your wash and make sure this level is well above
              your elements.

              Scott

              --- In Distillers@y..., "ogzo46" <ericoz@b...> wrote:
              > Hi guys,
              > I want to know what is the best way to clean stainless
              steel,
              > I think caustic soda is used in wineries etc, but I don't like the
              > thought of caustic burns! Also, when you guys with big stills, like
              > 20lts plus do a run, how do you know when the boiler is getting low
              > because I can see a saftey issue here and internal elements seem
              more
              > risky than a naked flame outside the boiler, and alcohol fires are
              > easier to put out with water, arn't they?
              > Regards Eric Oz
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