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Metabisulphite smell

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  • ksmoore2
    Hi, I m new to this, got interested through Tony Ackland s website (good job Tony), and started off with the ice-wok style still. After cracking a coupla
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 23, 2002
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      Hi,

      I'm new to this, got interested through Tony Ackland's website (good
      job Tony), and started off with the ice-wok style still. After
      cracking a coupla bowls, I've decided to build a pot-still (pressure
      cooker style), and have just been doing the first test runs.

      First alcohol test run was what was left over from the last ice-wok-
      bowl-crack event, and worked fine. I followed Jack's further advice
      and tested it with some of the cheapest wine I could fine. The
      output smelt like an incredibly strong sodium metabisulphite
      solution, and I assumed it had picked something up along the vapour
      path, but couldn't think what.

      So I took it all apart, and cleaned it again, just to make sure, and
      put through a diluted (to wine strength) amount of something from my
      ice-wok-still, and it came out fine. I went back to the cheap wine,
      and the smell was there again.

      So I guessed it was just the wine, and tried out some freeze-
      distilled cider I had prepared for this, and again there's the smell -
      intensely strong, as Mark Bennett says, it burns the nose. I braved
      a taste-test (well, swill-and-spit-test), and the taste seemed
      fine ...

      I then remebered a comment from Jack on Tony's website, about getting
      a sulphur smell, and it disappearing after a few days in the bottle.
      However, he said he had no copper in the path, and got rid of the
      smell by using copper packing. But I have copper tubing throughout -
      from pressure cooker 45deg up for 2.5', then back down 45deg for 2.5'
      before dropping onto condensor, a copper coil in a bucket (although
      I'm working on a jacketed condensor right now).

      But my question is - Jack and Tony - did you get a *sulphur* smell or
      a sodium metabisulhite smell? I think the smells are different, or
      did I dream that? And will it be safe to drink once the smell goes?

      Once I start distilling my own wines (I'm getting into this after a
      long time of home winemaking), I would like to avoid this problem, so
      is there a summary somewhere of all the thing to do/not to do?

      Cheers,

      Keith :-)
    • juanmorcheesey
      ... (good ... (pressure ... advice ... Some wines have sulphur dioxide added to them to stop the little yeasty beasties doing their thing at bottling time
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 25, 2002
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        --- In Distillers@y..., "ksmoore2" <ksmoore2@y...> wrote:
        > Hi,
        >
        > I'm new to this, got interested through Tony Ackland's website
        (good
        > job Tony), and started off with the ice-wok style still. After
        > cracking a coupla bowls, I've decided to build a pot-still
        (pressure
        > cooker style), and have just been doing the first test runs.
        >
        > First alcohol test run was what was left over from the last ice-wok-
        > bowl-crack event, and worked fine. I followed Jack's further
        advice
        > and tested it with some of the cheapest wine I could fine. The
        > output smelt like an incredibly strong sodium metabisulphite
        > solution, and I assumed it had picked something up along the vapour
        > path, but couldn't think what......................
        >

        Some wines have sulphur dioxide added to them to stop the little
        yeasty beasties doing their thing at bottling time (sterilises
        the ??wash?? in a manner like adding sodium metabisuphite )
        Also some people apparently really notice this addition in their
        hangovers or even after just a few glasses.
        Have heard that Sth. American wines (Chilean etc....)
        are more prone to this.(?maybe?not?)
      • ups474@aol.com
        You need some copper in the still to prevent that from happening again.
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 26, 2002
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          You need some copper in the still to prevent that from happening again.
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