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Cutting Pyrex Glass

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  • Randy
    I located an old coffee pot of some strange design in an antique shop for 15 bucks. What I noticed was that its shape was real close to the 500 dollar
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 29, 2002
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      I located an old coffee pot of some strange design in an antique shop for 15 bucks.   What I noticed was that its shape was real close to the 500 dollar essential oils stills that are for sale at various webpages.  I want to do a custom cut on the glass stem that sticks down from the top urn and then put a simple screen into the bottom of  the top urn and then a cork and a vapor line to a condensor alot along the same lines as tony's stovetop design on his webpage. 
       
      now for the tricky part, how do you go about cutting pyrex glass without ending up with many unusable pieces? 
    • bbstinga
      You can cut the glass with a masonary blade on a table/bench saw etc. But don t let the glass overheat, then fire polish the cut end with a propane tourch,
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 31, 2002
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        You can cut the glass with a masonary blade on a table/bench saw etc.
        But don't let the glass overheat, then fire polish the cut end with a
        propane tourch, heat up end few cm's of glass with a broad brush of
        the flame then concentrate the flame on the end to get it red hot.
        cool slowly. I've only played around with glass a little bit and
        smashed a fair few condensor coils I've been making etc along the
        way. But in my opinion you are better off going to a glass blower,
        they have an annealing furnace that they let the glass cure (for want
        of a better term) to remove strains/fracture in the glass. I've got
        the local university glass blower to make me up stuff and they are
        pretty cool with homers. Only problem is in this day and age they can
        be suspicious of people trying to make equipment for drug making. But
        glass stills do look the most pimped out especially with polished
        stainless so it is worth the effort.


        --- In Distillers@y..., "Randy" <cornfed15@h...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > I located an old coffee pot of some strange design in an antique
        shop for 15 bucks. What I noticed was that its shape was real close
        to the 500 dollar essential oils stills that are for sale at various
        webpages. I want to do a custom cut on the glass stem that sticks
        down from the top urn and then put a simple screen into the bottom
        of the top urn and then a cork and a vapor line to a condensor alot
        along the same lines as tony's stovetop design on his webpage.
        >
        > now for the tricky part, how do you go about cutting pyrex glass
        without ending up with many unusable pieces?
      • B Morey
        From: bbstinga To: Sent: Sunday, September 01, 2002 8:40 AM Subject: [Distillers] Re: Cutting Pyrex Glass
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 31, 2002
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          From: "bbstinga" <bbstinga@...>
          To: <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, September 01, 2002 8:40 AM
          Subject: [Distillers] Re: Cutting Pyrex Glass


          > You can cut the glass with a masonary blade on a table/bench
          saw etc.
          > But don't let the glass overheat, then fire polish the cut end
          with a
          > propane tourch, heat up end few cm's of glass with a broad
          brush of
          > the flame then concentrate the flame on the end to get it red
          hot.
          > cool slowly. I've only played around with glass a little bit
          and

          I've never cut glass but I have cut steel, masonry and floor
          tiles. Aren't masonry blades a bit thick for this? The ones
          I've used are composition blades about 4mm thick. I would have
          thought a diamond blade of the type used for tile or glass would
          work better -- they're about .5mm thick. Ones for a 125mm angle
          grinder are about $25 each. Or are we talking about the same
          thing?

          Bernard
        • cornfed62
          I have a dremmel tool with a wide assortment of attachments. Including some diamond grit cut off wheels and the original thin cut off disks. I am getting the
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 31, 2002
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            I have a dremmel tool with a wide assortment of attachments.
            Including some diamond grit cut off wheels and the original thin cut
            off disks.

            I am getting the impression that I should wrap the stem with tape and
            do the cut off. Would filling the stem with parafin wax reduce
            vibrations more? I can fire the stem afterward and smooth the edge
            up.

            I used to have a hobby kit when I was a youngster where you would
            scribe a line around a bottle and then heat it up. A rapid cooling
            would make the cut along the scribed line. Something tinkling in the
            back of my head tells me I would have shattered glass if I tried that
            technique with this


            --- In Distillers@y..., "B Morey" <bernardmorey@o...> wrote:
            > From: "bbstinga" <bbstinga@y...>
            > To: <Distillers@y...>
            > Sent: Sunday, September 01, 2002 8:40 AM
            > Subject: [Distillers] Re: Cutting Pyrex Glass
            >
            >
            > > You can cut the glass with a masonary blade on a table/bench
            > saw etc.
            > > But don't let the glass overheat, then fire polish the cut end
            > with a
            > > propane tourch, heat up end few cm's of glass with a broad
            > brush of
            > > the flame then concentrate the flame on the end to get it red
            > hot.
            > > cool slowly. I've only played around with glass a little bit
            > and
            >
            > I've never cut glass but I have cut steel, masonry and floor
            > tiles. Aren't masonry blades a bit thick for this? The ones
            > I've used are composition blades about 4mm thick. I would have
            > thought a diamond blade of the type used for tile or glass would
            > work better -- they're about .5mm thick. Ones for a 125mm angle
            > grinder are about $25 each. Or are we talking about the same
            > thing?
            >
            > Bernard
          • Dick
            For general information there are some excellent articles about amateurs working/making laboratory glassware (including out of Pyrex) on the Scientific
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 1, 2002
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              For general information there are some excellent articles about amateurs
              working/making laboratory glassware (including out of Pyrex) on the
              Scientific American Amateur Scientist Collection CD.
              --
              Dick
              Fra' Auld Reekie
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