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Re: Caramel

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  • waljaco
    The French and English caramel is from the Spanish caramelo which is derived from medieval Latin. The mel part refers to honey (cane honey). Several sites
    Message 1 of 12 , May 29, 2002
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      The French and English caramel is from the Spanish 'caramelo' which
      is derived from medieval Latin. The 'mel' part refers to honey (cane
      honey).
      Several sites on the subject:
      'Caramelize Sugar'
      http://www.baking911.com/howto_sugar_caramelize.html
      'Caramelizing Sugar for Flan the Easy Way' (microwave method)
      http://mexconnect.com/foodboard/messages/8015.html

      In a cooking site with a recipe for Trinidad Black Cake (Christmas
      Cake) there is a local method for caramelizing sugar - which is most
      probably the method used (or was used) for local dark rum:

      Caramelizing Sugar
      Put brown sugar in a heavy pot. Stir, letting sugar liquefy. Cook
      over a low heat until dark, stirring constantly, so the sugar does
      not burn. When almost burnt, remove from heat and stir in hot water
      gradually. Mix well, let cool.
      3/4 lb brown sugar (350 g)
      1/2 cup boiling water

      Wal
    • burrows206
      Hi guys, To make a caramel colouring solution you basically, on a low heat, slowly reduce a high content sugar/water solution and the sugar in the solution
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 29, 2009
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        Hi guys,
        To make a caramel colouring solution you basically, on a low heat, slowly reduce a high content sugar/water solution and the sugar in the solution starts to cook or turn brown or caramelizes as the water steams off.(watching and stirring all the time).
        My question is in order to change the colour of a clear neutral spirit. The amount of finished sweet dark concentrate caramel you would need to add to colour it to a nice amber colour, would this not also make it excessively sweet?
        Never having done this I don't know but I've thought about this many times because I know from experience that very little sugar on a teaspoon can make a bottle of wine sickly sweet. So what's the real deal in practice? Nice amber spirit but sickly sweet or what?
        Geoff
      • anthonyathawes
        Making up Caramel was just about the only thing I got right in making rum. I put the whole cupfull into a gallon of spirit. Surprisingly, it came out a touch
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 29, 2009
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          Making up Caramel was just about the only thing I got right in making rum.

          I put the whole cupfull into a gallon of spirit. Surprisingly, it came out a touch sweet but not objectionally so. However, the colour, whilst being really good, was too strong, and I've determined to use half the quantity next time. (I suspect the heating process destroys much of its sweetness). Should be worth a few experiments.

          Tony



          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "burrows206" <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi guys,
          > To make a caramel colouring solution you basically, on a low heat, slowly reduce a high content sugar/water solution and the sugar in the solution starts to cook or turn brown or caramelizes as the water steams off.(watching and stirring all the time).
          > My question is in order to change the colour of a clear neutral spirit. The amount of finished sweet dark concentrate caramel you would need to add to colour it to a nice amber colour, would this not also make it excessively sweet?
          > Never having done this I don't know but I've thought about this many times because I know from experience that very little sugar on a teaspoon can make a bottle of wine sickly sweet. So what's the real deal in practice? Nice amber spirit but sickly sweet or what?
          > Geoff
          >
        • Sherman
          I have had the best luck using this recipe for caramel. Simple Caramel flavoring This one is fun to do. Mix in a sauce pan, 1/2 cup white sugar and 1/4 cup
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 29, 2009
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            I have had the best luck using this recipe for caramel.

            Simple Caramel flavoring
            This one is fun to do.

            Mix in a sauce pan, 1/2 cup white sugar and 1/4 cup lemon juice. I used the juice of half a lemon. Heat this on high until it is bubbly and dark brown. use caution because even though it is burning the sugar, there is a fine line between brown and burnt and it happens quite quick

            while it is still bubbling on the heat add 1 cup cold water pouring very carefully to not cool it off too fast. Stir until it is uniform and thin.
            It should be about the color of coke. It isn't very sweet though.

            There are some additional things to help out neutral or rum.
            http://tinyurl.com/dbwel3
            this is two of my favorites.


            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@...> wrote:
            >
            > Making up Caramel was just about the only thing I got right in making rum.
            >
            > I put the whole cupfull into a gallon of spirit. Surprisingly, it came out a touch sweet but not objectionally so. However, the colour, whilst being really good, was too strong, and I've determined to use half the quantity next time. (I suspect the heating process destroys much of its sweetness). Should be worth a few experiments.
            >
            > Tony
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "burrows206" <jeffrey.burrows@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi guys,
            > > To make a caramel colouring solution you basically, on a low heat, slowly reduce a high content sugar/water solution and the sugar in the solution starts to cook or turn brown or caramelizes as the water steams off.(watching and stirring all the time).
            > > My question is in order to change the colour of a clear neutral spirit. The amount of finished sweet dark concentrate caramel you would need to add to colour it to a nice amber colour, would this not also make it excessively sweet?
            > > Never having done this I don't know but I've thought about this many times because I know from experience that very little sugar on a teaspoon can make a bottle of wine sickly sweet. So what's the real deal in practice? Nice amber spirit but sickly sweet or what?
            > > Geoff
            > >
            >
          • martin martins
            If you ve done any cooking you ll be more use to this. Don t bother with the water or other liquids, sugar needs to get hot to caramalize and at those
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 29, 2009
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              If you've done any cooking you'll be more use to this.

              Don't bother with the water or other liquids, sugar needs to get hot to caramalize and at those temperatures, there's not a lot of water left over and you just spend time evapourating water before making caramel. Here's my way. Get a heavy stainless-steel pan. I use a thick tri-layer one which distributes the heat better than plain stainless. Put in your sugur and put pan onto hot plate. As soon as you see some action turn the plate right down to low, residual heat will make the reaction work. The next part goes fast. The sugar melts and starts to turn brown, use a wooden spoon to give it a mix and get all the crystals melted.

              The next bit is even faster, as soon as it hits the colour you want throw in a cup of water and stand well back. Leave it too long before throwing in the water and you get charcoal. 

              The water flashboils (so really stand well back) and stops the reaction. Then over a gentle heat stir to disolve the caramel into the remaining water. Pure caramel isn't sweet, but you will never make pure caramel so there will be some residual sweetness from unreacted sugar. The darker the caramel the less sweet it becomes and the more of a charcoal taste you get. Sugar is cheep enough, make 3 or 4 trials and decide what taste you like best and then just go by colour.


              From: burrows206 <jeffrey.burrows@...>
              To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2009 9:49:25 AM
              Subject: [Distillers] Caramel

              Hi guys,
              To make a caramel colouring solution you basically, on a low heat, slowly reduce a high content sugar/water solution and the sugar in the solution starts to cook or turn brown or caramelizes as the water steams off.(watching and stirring all the time).
              My question is in order to change the colour of a clear neutral spirit. The amount of finished sweet dark concentrate caramel you would need to add to colour it to a nice amber colour, would this not also make it excessively sweet?
              Never having done this I don't know but I've thought about this many times because I know from experience that very little sugar on a teaspoon can make a bottle of wine sickly sweet. So what's the real deal in practice? Nice amber spirit but sickly sweet or what?
              Geoff


            • Mike Novak
              Guy s, You re all doing this the hard way. Pop down to your local Chinese Grocery and buy a bottle of cooking caramel for a couple of dollars. The one I use is
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 30, 2009
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                Guy's,
                You're all doing this the hard way.
                Pop down to your local Chinese Grocery and buy a bottle of cooking caramel for a couple of dollars.
                The one I use is KARAMEL MASAKAN, works a treat...even in Chinese cooking!
              • castillo.alex2008
                Hi I rely on oak for the final color, the longer the better and add some honey to mellow and add a little of sweet and raising extract, made by myself for that
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 31, 2009
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                  Hi

                  I rely on oak for the final color, the longer the better and add some honey to mellow and add a little of sweet and raising extract, made by myself for that brandy finishing good rums have, but now reading this thread I wonder if a faster solution to the problem would be to add some amount (i.e. 1/4 cup per gallon?) of maple syrup (the dark one used for pancakes) to get both color and sweet. Does any one have experience in it?

                  Alex

                  --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Novak" <zedrally@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Guy's,
                  > You're all doing this the hard way.
                  > Pop down to your local Chinese Grocery and buy a bottle of cooking caramel for a couple of dollars.
                  > The one I use is KARAMEL MASAKAN, works a treat...even in Chinese cooking!
                  >
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