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mash

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  • stevesnewplace
    I ve been doing tons of reading and research and am leaning toward purchasing a still. However, I m a little confused with regard to mash, worts, washes. Now
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 31, 2014
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      I've been doing tons of reading and research and am leaning toward purchasing a still.  However, I'm a little confused with regard to mash, worts, washes.  Now I've mainly been researching grain mashes since it is where my interests are.  But I'm confused about the mash part, you've fermented it and its ready for the still, do you strain out the grain and only use the liquid of does every thing go in.  May sound like a dumb question but since I've not done anything I'm thoroughly confused at this point.  I have ordered a couple of books that will hopefully provide an answer, but any help is appreciated.
    • John Thomas
      Steve, My slogan is if you can make good beer you can make good whiskey. The beer is what gets distilled. You can buy an extract then add water to have wort
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 31, 2014
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        Steve,

        My slogan is if you can make good beer you can make good whiskey.  The beer is what gets distilled.  You can buy an extract then add water to have wort for making beer or you can make your own wort by using a mash lauter tun.  Once you have the wort boil it for 90 minutes cool it and you haver beer.  The beer gets distilled.  This is an over simplification but give you the basic step.  
         
        John S. Thomas
        Hobby Beverage Equipment Co.
        Box 1387, Temecula
        CA 92953
        (951) 676-2337
      • Robert Hubble
        Stevelo, Mashing is specifically the part where you use enzymes, natural or purchased, to convert the starch in your grain to fermentable sugars. As far as
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 31, 2014
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          Stevelo,

          Mashing is specifically the part where you use enzymes, natural or purchased, to convert the starch in your grain to fermentable sugars.

          As far as what you do with that mash after the mashing process, it depends. If your grain is barley malt, and you have some allgrain (beer) brewing skills, the sugar-bearing water is easily separated from grain, and is a nice clear liquid to ferment and distill, whether you are heating externally with gas or electric, submersible electric element, or steam injection, or using some sort of heat-transfer-fluid (HTF...water's only moderately effective). With any care, you will not have enough solids in your wort or wash (no real difference at this point) to scorch on the heated surface of the still. Submersible elements are the worst for scorching, external heating is much less likely to scorch, and scorching is pretty much not an issue with steam injection and HTF bath. If you build a still from a keg with only that teensy hole at the top and no access port, you can imagine how disastrous scorching can be, and the liquor tastes terrible.

          Unfortunately for us stillers, all grains are not created equal, and corn-containing mashes can be seriously problematic. Dependent on your skill, patience, experience, and maybe access to some magic enzymes, corn mashes can be goopy, gluey, and very difficult to get much of the sweet liquid out of the mash, and especially of you're using a submersible element, you must get that wash completely solid-free. You'll hear all kinds of stories about sieves, strainers, bag-squeezing, and spin-dry washing machines, but as of recently, Pinto-O-Shine's magic enzymes make way more sense than anything else.
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtnboJ3Kxeo&list=UUG034xngTRhbEAxK8Wya5Gg

          If you're an externally-heated potstiller, as I am, you can tolerate a bit of junk in your wash, by stirring the open pot until it just boils, and then assembling the still and progressing with the run, but I think all the commercial distillers distill on the grain with steam or HTF. (I have yet to use Pint's enzymes, but I've got 'em, and I'm building gear to use 'em.)

          Although I have no personal experience with rye, I'm told it makes corn look like a walk in the park, so be warned.

          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


          From: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 04:52:42 -0700
          Subject: [Distillers] mash

           


          I've been doing tons of reading and research and am leaning toward purchasing a still.  However, I'm a little confused with regard to mash, worts, washes.  Now I've mainly been researching grain mashes since it is where my interests are.  But I'm confused about the mash part, you've fermented it and its ready for the still, do you strain out the grain and only use the liquid of does every thing go in.  May sound like a dumb question but since I've not done anything I'm thoroughly confused at this point.  I have ordered a couple of books that will hopefully provide an answer, but any help is appreciated.
        • RLB
          Just don t forget to add yeast and ferment before you distill.  :-) When making beer many people just place an open clean pillow case into water, and slowly
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 31, 2014
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            Just don't forget to add yeast and ferment before you distill.  :-)

            When making beer many people just place an open clean pillow case into water, and slowly pour grain into pillow case while stirring.  After its boiled, remove pillow case part way and wash grain with a gallon of reserved distilled water.  Set pillow case aside.  After its cooled to 155 F, add your malt (enzymes).  When its cooled to 85 F (depends on the type of yeast and weather), pitch your yeast.  3 (turbo) to 21 days later, you can distill.

            Robert L. Bliven
            RB Distillation Co.
            PO Box 217
            Kanona, NY  14856
            607-542-3043

            Specializing in Malted Grains


            From: "John Thomas john@... [Distillers]" <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
            To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 1:35 PM
            Subject: [Distillers] Re: mash

             
            Steve,

            My slogan is if you can make good beer you can make good whiskey.  The beer is what gets distilled.  You can buy an extract then add water to have wort for making beer or you can make your own wort by using a mash lauter tun.  Once you have the wort boil it for 90 minutes cool it and you haver beer.  The beer gets distilled.  This is an over simplification but give you the basic step.  
             
            John S. Thomas
            Hobby Beverage Equipment Co.
            Box 1387, Temecula
            CA 92953
            (951) 676-2337


          • Desross
            Actually, standard malted barley has more than sufficient enzymes to convert the starch content of the malts to sugars when placed in water at between 62 and
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 31, 2014
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              Actually, standard malted barley has more than sufficient enzymes to convert the starch content of the malts to sugars when placed in water at between 62 and 66 degrees Celcius and kept at that temperature for an hour...no extra enzymes require to be added. Also, using a more permeable material than a pillow case would be my recommendation for a bag ( best to get one from a Home Brew Shop) or make your own. Of all my AG brewer friends, none use a pillow case! Third, If you put the malted grain in boiling water you will completely denature these enzymes plus leave a high ammount of unfermentable dextrins in your wort. As distillers, we want the highest fermentable solution possible, so mash our grains at a lower temperature than a beer brewer who generally wants a product with more body and gmouthfeel, so mashes at a slightly higher temperature specifically to get the dextrins. I would strongly discourage anyone to ferment wort with a turbo yeast. Use an ale yeast at 19-23 degrees C and you will be rewarded with a far superior product for distilling. Lastly, be patient and wait until the wort is completely cleared before removing off the sediment...yeast in the wash can compromise the final product.
              Anyone unsure of the correct process can get lots of information by a Google search on BIAB home brewing.
            • bsammons_99
              Take a look at http://homedistiller.org/forum/ http://homedistiller.org/forum/ and http://www.artisan-distiller.net/phpBB3/index.php
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 31, 2014
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                Take a look at http://homedistiller.org/forum/ and http://www.artisan-distiller.net/phpBB3/index.php
                if you haven't seen them.  You can learn everything you need to know there.


                 

              • bsammons_99
                Short answer: If you re at the hobby scale, you re probably looking at a direct fired or electric immersion element still. Either one will have scorching
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 31, 2014
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                  Short answer:
                  If you're at the hobby scale, you're probably looking at a direct fired or electric immersion element still.  Either one will have scorching issues if there are solids in it.  So strain out the solids, yes.  Sometimes you can get away with it still having suspended yeast - where its opaque and creamy - but sometimes that will scorch too. To remove that, first strain out the solids, then let settle again, then siphon the clear stuff off the top after it has settled a while. Rye scorches particularly easy, so make sure to have it really clear, and go easier on the heat.
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