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Did not know this.

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  • blkpowdr
    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/07/28/your-craft-whiskey-is-probably-from-a-factory-distillery-in-indiana.html
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 29, 2014
    • RLB
      This is what pisses me off more than anything about this industry.  You start a distillery by producing and selling your own brand of vodka and legal
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 29, 2014
        This is what pisses me off more than anything about this industry.  You start a distillery by producing and selling your own brand of vodka and legal moonshine to pay the bills while your bourbon, rye, malt, and scotch ages in barrels, but these people run out and buy this pig swill from a generic distiller who sells nothing but alcohol to any sap who will buy it.  What quality control could this company really have, and what formula are they using?  No one can tell me that they have 100 different formulas to meet every ones needs, so these so called craft distilleries have to keep purchasing their piss water.  Their so called signature brand is lost when they start selling their own distillate from barrels.

        People rave about aged spirits, but how many can tell the difference between aged, mature and immature spirits?  I bet that 95% of people can tell the difference.  All you need to do is toss toasted oak plugs into a quart jar for three weeks to a month to make it mature.  People wonder why I would want to start a distillery when I can go to a liquor store, and this is the perfect example of why.

        Buy the way, I wonder how many of these distilleries enter their brand into industry contests?  Wonder how many of these fakes actually won win someone else spirits?

        Robert   


        From: "blkpowdr@... [Distillers]" <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
        To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 2:28 PM
        Subject: [Distillers] Did not know this.

         


      • Eddie Hoskin
        Meh, not that big a deal for me.  I ve actually had a number of those bourbon and thought they were good, not great. How is it any different from Scotch
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 29, 2014

          Meh, not that big a deal for me. I've actually had a number of those bourbon and thought they were good, not great.

          How is it any different from Scotch whiskey blenders?
          Sure, it's somewhat dishonest to slap a fake story on the side of your bottle and call it your own, but if folks like it, then that's the important thing!

          See also: contract brewing.

          My 2 cents.

          Radical Ed

          Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



          From: RLB last2blast@... [Distillers] <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>;
          To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>;
          Subject: Re: [Distillers] Did not know this.
          Sent: Tue, Jul 29, 2014 7:24:33 PM

           

          This is what pisses me off more than anything about this industry.  You start a distillery by producing and selling your own brand of vodka and legal moonshine to pay the bills while your bourbon, rye, malt, and scotch ages in barrels, but these people run out and buy this pig swill from a generic distiller who sells nothing but alcohol to any sap who will buy it.  What quality control could this company really have, and what formula are they using?  No one can tell me that they have 100 different formulas to meet every ones needs, so these so called craft distilleries have to keep purchasing their piss water.  Their so called signature brand is lost when they start selling their own distillate from barrels.

          People rave about aged spirits, but how many can tell the difference between aged, mature and immature spirits?  I bet that 95% of people can tell the difference.  All you need to do is toss toasted oak plugs into a quart jar for three weeks to a month to make it mature.  People wonder why I would want to start a distillery when I can go to a liquor store, and this is the perfect example of why.

          Buy the way, I wonder how many of these distilleries enter their brand into industry contests?  Wonder how many of these fakes actually won win someone else spirits?

          Robert   


          From: "blkpowdr@... [Distillers]" <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
          To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 2:28 PM
          Subject: [Distillers] Did not know this.
        • bsammons_99
          If someone likes the booze for the price, great. What I don t like is the dishonesty of it - when they are dishonest. Some are much worse than others on that
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 31, 2014
            If someone likes the booze for the price, great.  What I don't like is the dishonesty of it - when they are dishonest.  Some are much worse than others on that front.
            I've gotten in the habit of looking at the back of every bottle to the legally required statement to see if it says "bottled by" "bottled at" or "produced by"  rather than "distilled."  That's the spot they can't lie.  If it doesn't say distilled, they didn't distill it.  
          • coloniera1
            For sure that s big time fraud and a condemnable practice but I wanted to thank the OP for the great product source! I had an idea going around for some time
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 4, 2014
              For sure that's big time fraud and a condemnable practice but I wanted to thank the OP for the great product source!  I had an idea going around for some time and this link (that resulted from the Googling of the info provided by the OP) crystallized it:
              MGP Ingredients

                Again, thanks a lot!


            • coloniera1
              Apparently, and according to one of their representatives that I contacted via e-mail, they only sell in truckloads/trainloads. Was that a brush-off? Can t
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 4, 2014
                Apparently, and according to one of their representatives that I contacted via e-mail, they only sell in truckloads/trainloads.  Was that a brush-off?  Can't believe the small businesses mentioned in that article buy a truckload of the stuff.  Perhaps they do.  Giving some use to the CC fermenters, perhaps?
              • RLB
                They most likely sell it to wholesale distributors (who purchase truck and train loads), and those distributors then resell to small so called distillers. At
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 4, 2014
                  They most likely sell it to wholesale distributors (who purchase truck and train loads), and those distributors then resell to small so called distillers.

                  At least their spirits are most likely good enough for bottom shelf, and something tells me that someone had a great idea to market a house brand of spirit for bars.  Someone then had an idea to market to distillers. 

                  Robert


                  From: "hectorlandaeta@... [Distillers]" <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                  To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, August 4, 2014 6:57 PM
                  Subject: [Distillers] Re: Did not know this.

                   
                  Apparently, and according to one of their representatives that I contacted via e-mail, they only sell in truckloads/trainloads.  Was that a brush-off?  Can't believe the small businesses mentioned in that article buy a truckload of the stuff.  Perhaps they do.  Giving some use to the CC fermenters, perhaps?


                • Bob
                  I wonder how much they sell the 190 proof industrial food grade for? Redistill? Smok’in bobc I wonder how much they sell the 190 proof industrial food grade
                  Message 8 of 10 , Aug 5, 2014
                    I wonder how much they sell the 190 proof industrial food grade for? Redistill? Smok’in
                    bobc
                  • edbar44
                    I contacted a different company a few years ago and they told me the 190 was $1.75 per proof gallon so as I understand it, a proof gallon if a gallon of 100
                    Message 9 of 10 , Aug 6, 2014
                      I contacted a different company a few years ago and they told me the 190 was $1.75 per proof gallon so as I understand it, a proof gallon if a gallon of 100 proof or 50% so I'm guessing that a gallon of 190 would cost about $3.15
                    • sheltonus
                      A Pharmco-Aaper website (link included below) states that *Tax paid industrial alcohol may be purchased for non-beverage use [EXPERIMENTATION?] without a
                      Message 10 of 10 , Aug 6, 2014
                        A Pharmco-Aaper website (link included below) states that *Tax paid industrial alcohol may be purchased for non-beverage use [EXPERIMENTATION?] without a federal permit or bond, by payment of federal tax of $13.50 per proof gallon. A simple version of proof gallons is the proof of the alcohol times the number of US gallons divided by 100 (Proof x Gallons/100=Proof Gallons). 


                        The excise tax rate per proof gallon is born out at the following TTB link at $13.50 per proof gallon, less any credit for wine and flavor content. 
                        TTB | Tax Audit Division | Tax and Fee Rates

                         



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