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Peach Brandy

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  • Walter Jacobson
    http://tinyurl.com/mz4jqr8 wal
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 29, 2014
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    • Robert Hubble
      Damn, Wal, This makes me sad. A couple of years ago, I scored an orchard full of peaches, and got about 30 gallons of fermenting peach mash from it. Last year
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 29, 2014
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        Damn, Wal,

        This makes me sad. A couple of years ago, I scored an orchard full of peaches, and got about
        30 gallons of fermenting peach mash from it. Last year I distilled it, doing everything I could to
        maximize that peach flavor, and last year it tasted like a great success, with lots of natural distilled
        peach flavor.

        I opened one of the gallons last week, with my mouth primed for that great peach taste, not really
        like peach juice dripping down my arm, but a nice eau de vie peach flavor.

        It's all gone! All the flavor has fled, and I might was well be drinking sugar head. I'm crushed!

        Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


        To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        From: waljaco@...
        Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 20:47:21 +1030
        Subject: [Distillers] Peach Brandy

         
        http://tinyurl.com/mz4jqr8

        wal

      • hectorlandaeta@rocketmail.com
        To save your batch try an ethylic extraction of just the peel and the peach s stones (those are the parts that have more essential oil content) with the
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 30, 2014
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          To save your batch try an ethylic extraction of just the peel and the peach's stones (those are the parts that have more essential oil content) with the highest alcohol you have at hand.  The extraction shouldn't take less than 4 weeks nor more than 5 months, given you use ethanol above 85% ABV. Then decant and cheese cloth filter the extract (should have a nice deep yellow color) and give the pit and peel residue a fast stripping run to recover not only the ethanol but a very nice and concentrated extract too.  I find the "hot"  extract has a markedly different character than the "cold" one so be advised to store them separately.  Blend a bit of this extracts with the already obtained whiskey and you'll see a very interesting spirit arise. 

          I believe the "nice" flavor extraction on the Mt. Vernon spirit mentioned in Volodimir's WP article link must be caused by them distilling the whole fruit (peel, pit, stem and all).

          I've studied "Alpine" schnapps making for some time and found that almost invariably when the original fruit is lacking in sugar content it's wines are almost always "helped" with some high ABV alcohol obtained from neutral sources prior to distilling.  European schnapps stills are also designed for essential extraction over rectifying efficiency and big in dephlegmating capacity to cope with "all-in" runs.

          Hope this helps.

        • RLB
          Don t peach pits contain arsenic?  Can it be transferred to your distillate?  Just wondered. Robert ________________________________ From:
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 30, 2014
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            Don't peach pits contain arsenic?  Can it be transferred to your distillate?  Just wondered.

            Robert


            From: "hectorlandaeta@..." <hectorlandaeta@...>
            To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, March 30, 2014 5:54 PM
            Subject: RE: [Distillers] Peach Brandy

             
            To save your batch try an ethylic extraction of just the peel and the peach's stones (those are the parts that have more essential oil content) with the highest alcohol you have at hand.  The extraction shouldn't take less than 4 weeks nor more than 5 months, given you use ethanol above 85% ABV. Then decant and cheese cloth filter the extract (should have a nice deep yellow color) and give the pit and peel residue a fast stripping run to recover not only the ethanol but a very nice and concentrated extract too.  I find the "hot"  extract has a markedly different character than the "cold" one so be advised to store them separately.  Blend a bit of this extracts with the already obtained whiskey and you'll see a very interesting spirit arise. 
            I believe the "nice" flavor extraction on the Mt. Vernon spirit mentioned in Volodimir's WP article link must be caused by them distilling the whole fruit (peel, pit, stem and all).
            I've studied "Alpine" schnapps making for some time and found that almost invariably when the original fruit is lacking in sugar content it's wines are almost always "helped" with some high ABV alcohol obtained from neutral sources prior to distilling.  European schnapps stills are also designed for essential extraction over rectifying efficiency and big in dephlegmating capacity to cope with "all-in" runs.
            Hope this helps.


          • Robert Hubble
            Thanks Hector, that gives me some directions to look. In my case, the peaches were very ripe and soft, so in the orchard I squeezed each peach by hand, such
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 30, 2014
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              Thanks Hector, that gives me some directions to look.

              In my case, the peaches were very ripe and soft, so in the orchard I squeezed each peach by hand, such that when I was through,
              only the stone remained in my hand. I squeezed into a 55-gallon malt syrup barrel, to which I added a bit of pectic enzyme, which liquified the peach mash nicely.

              I distilled about 33 gallons of the pulp, on the pulp, and then diluted those low wines with the remaining pulp, to give about 27% ABV low wines for the spirit run. No sugar was added to anything. All this was done to maximize flavor, or so I thought.

              I'll have to go to Harry's library to look up eaux de vie optimized stills.

              Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


              To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
              From: hectorlandaeta@...
              Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2014 14:54:04 -0700
              Subject: RE: [Distillers] Peach Brandy

               

              To save your batch try an ethylic extraction of just the peel and the peach's stones (those are the parts that have more essential oil content) with the highest alcohol you have at hand.  The extraction shouldn't take less than 4 weeks nor more than 5 months, given you use ethanol above 85% ABV. Then decant and cheese cloth filter the extract (should have a nice deep yellow color) and give the pit and peel residue a fast stripping run to recover not only the ethanol but a very nice and concentrated extract too.  I find the "hot"  extract has a markedly different character than the "cold" one so be advised to store them separately.  Blend a bit of this extracts with the already obtained whiskey and you'll see a very interesting spirit arise. 

              I believe the "nice" flavor extraction on the Mt. Vernon spirit mentioned in Volodimir's WP article link must be caused by them distilling the whole fruit (peel, pit, stem and all).

              I've studied "Alpine" schnapps making for some time and found that almost invariably when the original fruit is lacking in sugar content it's wines are almost always "helped" with some high ABV alcohol obtained from neutral sources prior to distilling.  European schnapps stills are also designed for essential extraction over rectifying efficiency and big in dephlegmating capacity to cope with "all-in" runs.

              Hope this helps.


            • Robert Hubble
              You re thinking of cyanide, a carbon compound (or part of one). A lot of the bitter almond flavor in peach pits is amygdalin, an organic compound with one
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 30, 2014
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                You're thinking of cyanide, a carbon compound (or part of one).  A lot of the bitter almond flavor in peach pits is amygdalin, an organic compound with one cyanide radical, and much less toxic than simple cyanides. Arsenic's an element.

                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                From: last2blast@...
                Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2014 18:05:23 -0700
                Subject: Re: [Distillers] Peach Brandy

                 

                Don't peach pits contain arsenic?  Can it be transferred to your distillate?  Just wondered.

                Robert


                From: "hectorlandaeta@..." <hectorlandaeta@...>
                To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, March 30, 2014 5:54 PM
                Subject: RE: [Distillers] Peach Brandy

                 
                To save your batch try an ethylic extraction of just the peel and the peach's stones (those are the parts that have more essential oil content) with the highest alcohol you have at hand.  The extraction shouldn't take less than 4 weeks nor more than 5 months, given you use ethanol above 85% ABV. Then decant and cheese cloth filter the extract (should have a nice deep yellow color) and give the pit and peel residue a fast stripping run to recover not only the ethanol but a very nice and concentrated extract too.  I find the "hot"  extract has a markedly different character than the "cold" one so be advised to store them separately.  Blend a bit of this extracts with the already obtained whiskey and you'll see a very interesting spirit arise. 
                I believe the "nice" flavor extraction on the Mt. Vernon spirit mentioned in Volodimir's WP article link must be caused by them distilling the whole fruit (peel, pit, stem and all).
                I've studied "Alpine" schnapps making for some time and found that almost invariably when the original fruit is lacking in sugar content it's wines are almost always "helped" with some high ABV alcohol obtained from neutral sources prior to distilling.  European schnapps stills are also designed for essential extraction over rectifying efficiency and big in dephlegmating capacity to cope with "all-in" runs.
                Hope this helps.



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