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Re: Yeast Comment

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  • waljaco
    Your sources are questionable. EC1118 is widely used for winemaking worlwide! A distilling yeast (turbo yeast) has certain characteristics that make it
    Message 1 of 32 , Mar 3, 2013
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      Your sources are questionable. EC1118 is widely used for winemaking worlwide! A distilling yeast (turbo yeast) has certain characteristics that make it unsuitable for good flavoured musts.
      wal

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB <last2blast@...> wrote:
      >
      > most of the comments I have read is that 1118 is not a good wine yeast because of a possible stale taste, but it makes for a good distillers yeast.
      >
      > Robert
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: waljaco <waljaco@...>
      > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sunday, March 3, 2013 5:25 AM
      > Subject: [Distillers] Re: Yeast Comment
      >
      >
      >  
      > Source:
      > http://www.lalvinyeast.com/EC1118.asp
      > wal
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" wrote:
      > >
      > > S.bayanus (E1118) is the yeast of choice in commercial wine making - it is especially useful to restart a stalled fermentation. It does eliminate wild yeasts though (a killer yeast), is neutral in flavor production and can be used as a turbo substitute with proper nutrients.
      > > wal
      > >
      > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, fatbloke wrote:
      > > >
      > > > 1116 isn't as quick but if you check the lalvin yeast list you'd note its rated at 18%. I'd have thought that it would make a better base batch prior to pot stilling, though if it's just for refluxing then 1118 should work well. After all, it would be about the residual flavours that are retained with a pot.
      > > >
      > > > Additionally, DV10 seems to be considered a cleaner ferment but it's harder to get and unlike the other two isn't one of the usual suspects. 1118 is fine for what it's intended, just not the general usage suggested by many HBS.
      > > >
      > > > I don't usually try to max out the tolerance anyway as that's asking for problems. Not that that matters with my sugar wash. I just aim for an easily attainable 14% or so.RLB wrote:Agreed that 1118 is not a good yeast for wine and mead because all of my readings stated as such, but my reading states that it's a very good yeast for distillation.  That might be the reason why it's so popular.  In my reading, they agree that 1116 is a very aggressive yeast but they place its alcohol tolerance at 16% abv.  They also state that 1116 is slower than 1118 which makes it a better wine yeast.
      > > >
      > > > I have a lot to learn about yeasts.
      > > >
      > > > Robert
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > From: fatbloke
      > > > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Saturday, March 2, 2013 3:52 AM
      > > > Subject: Re: [Distillers] Yeast Comment
      > > >
      > > >  
      > > > One of the things EC-1118 is known for is blowing a lot of the aromatics and more subtle flavouring volatiles straight out the air lock during ferment. It's a good yeast but not without issues. We find that for wines and meads, a better option is K1-V1116.  It is better at retaining both the aromatic and flavour volatiles, it's tolerant to 18% ABV, has a better temperature range and also has the "killer" factor where it will become the dominant yeast.
      > > >
      > > > I don't use 1118 these days, except for a standby for a stuck ferment, even then that's only because its more easily available than uvaferm 43, which seems capable of reviving the dead :-D
      > > >
      > > > EC-1118 is often recommended by HBS but that seems to be because they're not familar with the wide range of fermentation dynamics of high(er) gravity musts and that it's one of the 5 "usual suspects" in the Lalvin range for home brewing so they happen to stock it.......
      > > >
      > > > RLB wrote:
      > > >  
      > > > When I look at yeast 3 things are important to me cost, alcohol tolerance, and culture-ability.  "Prestige Whiskey Yeast with AG from Brewhaus" comes in a 23g Sachet, and it costs from $4 to $6 for use in 25L.  I did not read where you can raise "Prestige Whiskey Yeast with AG from Brewhaus", so Prestige Whiskey Yeast would not likely find its way onto my yeast list anytime soon.  It's positive note is that it contains a small amount of enzymes, but that amount does not seem to be large enough to break down a lot of starch compared to enzymes you can purchase.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > EC-1118 costs me $0.99 per 5g Sachet, which is about the same in comparison to the same amount of Prestige Whiskey Yeast.  1118 can be raised for at least 10 generations, and 1118 is tolerant up to 18% abv.  If I raise my 1118 ten generations, my yeast cost just dropped to $0.09  per application, and it retains its alcohol tolerant up to 18% abv.  My plan is to one day make my own enzymes, so for me 1118 will be my main Whiskey, Rum, Brandy yeast and regular baking yeast will take care of my Vodka and Gin.  Until something better can be found.
      > > >
      > > > Robert
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > From: henry sangret
      > > > To: "Distillers@yahoogroups.com" Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
      > > > Sent: Friday, March 1, 2013 5:24 PM
      > > > Subject: Re: [Distillers] Yeast Comment
      > > >
      > > >  
      > > > I use this yeast Prestige Whisky Yeast with AG from Brewhaus.  Of course with a starter I am required to use a enzyme cocktail for starch reduction. Another alternative is to buy 10 packs and get a discount.
      > > >
      > > > From: Robert Lemmen
      > > > To: "Distillers@yahoogroups.com" Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
      > > > Sent: Friday, March 1, 2013 12:56 PM
      > > > Subject: Re: [Distillers] Yeast Comment
      > > >
      > > > henry,
      > > >
      > > > On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 07:02:53AM -0800, henry sangret wrote:
      > > > > I agree , turbo yeast is interesting but not for the 2 to 4% gain you may achieve!  I like the Lavlvin as well but not for grain worts, it seems to geterate more MEK and a few others, for grain I have a grain yeast I purchased from a supplier that will ferment to 10% very cleanly. Once I used it, I now keep a clean starter and keep reusing it.
      > > >
      > > > out of interest, what yeast is that? I would like to do my first grain
      > > > wash soon, and am still puzzled about the yeast. I was thinking safale
      > > > S-04 or US-05...
      > > >
      > > > regards  robert
      > > >
      > > > --
      > > > Robert Lemmen                              http://www.semistable.com
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > > Distillers list archives :
      > > > http://www.taet.com.au/distillers.nsf/
      > > >
      > > > FAQ, Howto distil etc. :
      > > > http://homedistiller.orgYahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >  
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • waljaco
      Whisky yeast I gather contains glucoamylase which helps to finish off the starch conversion more completely. It is also used to make dry beers. wal
      Message 32 of 32 , Mar 4, 2013
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        Whisky yeast I gather contains glucoamylase which helps to finish off the starch conversion more completely. It is also used to make "dry" beers.
        wal

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Lemmen <robertle@...> wrote:
        >
        > hi henry,
        >
        > On Fri, Mar 01, 2013 at 02:24:03PM -0800, henry sangret wrote:
        > > I use this yeast Prestige Whisky Yeast with AG from Brewhaus.  Of course with a starter I am required to use a enzyme cocktail for starch reduction. Another alternative is to buy 10 packs and get a discount.
        >
        > great that you bring this up! this is something I don't understand at
        > all: why would it be any good to have AG in your yeast? shouldn't the
        > starch be converted by your malt before you pitch the yeast? what's the
        > benefit?
        >
        > thanks robert
        >
        > --
        > Robert Lemmen http://www.semistable.com
        >
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