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To Make Tobacca Water (Sr:W:R:)

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  • waljaco
    See msg 48895 (Sir Walter Raleigh s Great Cordial) for background. It is documented that Sir Walter Raleigh is connected to a recipe for a tobacco cordial. In
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 2, 2013
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      See msg 48895 (Sir Walter Raleigh's Great Cordial) for background.

      It is documented that Sir Walter Raleigh is connected to a recipe for a tobacco cordial. In Elinor Fettiplace's Receipt Book (1604)by Hilary Spurling we read -

      "Sir Walter was imprisoned in the Tower of London in 1604 when Lady Fettiplace, niece by marriage to Carew Raleigh, wrote his name in her own handwriting at the side of this recipe:

      To Make Serop Of Tobaccho (Sr W rallygh)
      Take a quart of water & three ounces of tobaccho, put the tobaccho in the water & let it lie night & day close covered, then boile it from a quart to a pinte, then straine it & put to everie pinte a pound of sugar, then put in the whites of three or four eggs finelie beaten, then set it on the fire, & when it boiles scum it, then cover it close, & let it boile, till it bee serop.

      To Make Tobacca Water (by: Sr: W: R:)
      Take two gallons of muscadell, a pound of bought leaf Tobacco, but not english, a pound of annisseeds, shread the Tobacco small, & pound the annisseed very small, then lay all to stiep, then distill it with a soft fire, & when you distill it, put in some reasins of the Sun, & so drink it."

      "There were said to be six thousand plantations in the south of England in the seventeenth century, before they were stamped out by the government in a move to safeguard its huge revenues from imported tobacco."

      Also see -
      http://tinyurl.com/bymq56w

      Another recipe (1829) that bears his name is -

      Sir Walter Raleigh's Sack (Sherry) Posset
      Boil a quart of cream, with a quantum sufficit of sugar, mace, and nutmeg; take half a pint of sack, and the same quantity of ale, and boil them well together, adding sugar; these being boiled separately are now to be added. Heat a pewter dish very hot and cover your basin with it and let it stand by the fire for two or three hours - Prob est.
      Apician Morsels: or tales of the table, kitchen and larder, (1829) by Dick Humelbergius Secundus.

      wal
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