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Re: Sugar Replacement

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  • last2blast
    Thanks again for the temp info. 152 F to 165 F sound like a better range. If you had not realized it as of yet, I am not a fan of fermenting slime. (That
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 9, 2012
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      Thanks again for the temp info. 152 F to 165 F sound like a better range. If you had not realized it as of yet, I am not a fan of fermenting slime. (That lesson was learned in my sugar wash where everything but the kitchen sink was thrown into ferment. Wow that sugar wash was nasty looking.) My none grain experiments will be limited to grating and pressing to extract juices. Yes, it might be better to ferment grapes, peaches, apples, or etc. with the pulp, but I will pass on those messes for now.

      Robert


      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Fredrick Lee <fredrick@...> wrote:
      >
      > > I would grate carrots and press the juices out, so my plan is to grate potatoes into a fine pulp and extract the juice by pressing, and that would keep the mess to a minimum. That juice would then be heated up to 165 F. and yeast added once it cooled.
      >
      >
      > Without some additional enzymes, that recipe will result in potato soup with yeast in it. Enzymes are required to convert potato starch into fermentable sugars. The enzymes must be added, potatoes don't have enough distatic power to convert starch. These enzymes will be debranched at about 122-133°F and make the soup more viscous, 152°F will activate them and start breaking down starches, and loosened up again at 168°F to release that last 2% of starch, and finally denatured and destroyed at higher than 168°F. If you want the most fermentable sugar from potatoes, that's the way. Lots of people have been fermenting all kinds of food for thousands of years. Most of those on that list are better for the dinner plate than the still. Onion is just downright slimy airplane glue when fermented.
      >
      > On Dec 9, 2012, at 7:48 PM, "last2blast" <last2blast@...> wrote:
      >
      > > I would grate carrots and press the juices out, so my plan is to grate potatoes into a fine pulp and extract the juice by pressing, and that would keep the mess to a minimum. That juice would then be heated up to 165 F. and yeast added once it cooled.
      >
    • Ed Barcik
      IMHO, HFCS is the best if you want clean and easy fermenting, never had one hang, been using it for 4 years.
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 10, 2012
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        IMHO, HFCS is the best if you want clean and easy fermenting, never had one hang, been using it for 4 years.

      • last2blast
        The main reason I am looking at sugar replacements is because of weather conditions that affect crops such as corn and sugar cane. If the US corn belt drought
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 11, 2012
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          The main reason I am looking at sugar replacements is because of weather conditions that affect crops such as corn and sugar cane. If the US corn belt drought lasts for a long time, we will have a problem obtaining grains such as corn and HFCS which are made from corn. Some people might say, So what! You only then have to look at Hawaii, Texas, Louisiana, and Florida that are all receiving less rainfall than normal. My experiments will address finding other sources of sugar and extracting those sugars for the production spirits.

          Are there weeds that would normally be harmful to humans, but contain high levels of sugar that will produce a wonderful spirit?

          Just a thought

          Robert



          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Barcik" <edbar44@...> wrote:
          >
          > IMHO, HFCS is the best if you want clean and easy fermenting, never had one
          > hang, been using it for 4 years.
          >
        • Derek Hamlet
          ... Sometimes I think we need to remember that there is nothing new about distilling. Absolutely improvements are made in still building technology. Science
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 11, 2012
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            At 12:47 AM 12/11/2012, you wrote:
            >
            >
            >The main reason I am looking at sugar replacements is because of
            >weather conditions that affect crops such as corn and sugar cane. If
            >the US corn belt drought lasts for a long time, we will have a
            >problem obtaining grains such as corn and HFCS which are made from
            >corn. Some people might say, So what! You only then have to look at
            >Hawaii, Texas, Louisiana, and Florida that are all receiving less
            >rainfall than normal. My experiments will address finding other
            >sources of sugar and extracting those sugars for the production spirits.
            >
            >Are there weeds that would normally be harmful to humans, but
            >contain high levels of sugar that will produce a wonderful spirit?

            Sometimes I think we need to remember that there is nothing new about
            distilling. Absolutely improvements are made in still building
            technology. Science brings new enzymes/yeasts etc. to market. But,
            mother nature provides the raw materials for the must. If it's
            natural, contains high sugars it's been tried. Hence the thumbs down
            on potatoes.
            If it's alcohol one wants and you are willing to mix it or add
            flavorings then neutral spirit is my advice. If you want the
            adventure of pot stills with inherent flavors, then some form of
            grains is probably the way to go. Yeah I know I didn't say anything about rum.


            Derek
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