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Re: FW: about using potatoes as feedstock

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  • waljaco
    The stepped infusion mash recipe from South Africa came from our archive! People read us... http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/1343 wal
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 30, 2012
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      The stepped infusion mash recipe from South Africa came from our archive! People read us...
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/1343
      wal

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...> wrote:
      >
      > That sounds more like it, one for the archives I think (mental note, check the price of feed potatoes :)
      >
      > Slainte, Riku
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)" <Tony.Ackland@> wrote:
      > >
      > > An email from a Finnish friend re using potatoes ....
      > >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: Teemu
      > >
      > > Sorry for my lousy english.
      > >
      > > Making vodka from potatoes
      > >
      > > Two good reasons for using potatoes:
      > >
      > > 1. Traditionally vodka is made of grain or potatoes to achieve the smooth &
      > > soft aroma; witch is typical to commercial European vodkas.
      > > 2. In Finland 1kg of sugar costs about 1,9e, 25kg sack of (feed) potatoes
      > > from local Agri-Market costs 2e...
      > >
      > >
      > > The recipe, witch may lead to prosecute:
      > >
      > > 20-25kg potatoes
      > > 1kg of barley, malted and gristed
      > > 50-100g of good (Turbo/Prestige/Partymann...) yeast (hydrated)
      > > Some fresh water
      > >
      > > Equipment needed:
      > > 30litre beer fermenter
      > > A large (30-50litre) kettle (I use a milk can...)
      > > A meat grinder (for mashing the potatoes)
      > > A large scoop or a "wash paddle"
      > > A hotplate with a thermostat
      > >
      > > 1. Clean all the dirt from the potatoes, (don't bother to peel them)
      > > 2. Put the potatoes in to kettle and cover them with water, bring to boil.
      > > Cook until the first ones break down -this should take about 1hr. In
      > > meanwhile hydrate the yeast and mix 1kg malt and 2litre of water (if you use
      > > homemade malt, don't dry them -it weakens the mysterious "amylathic power").
      > > 3. Pour the water out from the kettle (use mittens, be careful). Mash the
      > > potatoes in the grinder while they are hot. (If done right the mash looks
      > > like thick porridge.)
      > > 4. Put the mash to kettle (and adjust the hotplates temperature to 60C).
      > > Add 1/3 of the hydrated malt to the kettle and stir well. Wait until the
      > > temperature has dropt to 65C. Add the rest of the hydrated malt and stir in
      > > well. Let sit there for about 2 hours. Stir often. (If done right the wash
      > > should have turned flowing.)
      > > 5. Turn the hotplate off. Put the kettle in somewhere cool. When the
      > > temperature has dropped down to 25C pour to fermenter and add yeast (no
      > > nutrients needed). First carbon dioxide bubbles should rise after couple of
      > > hours; main fermenting takes about two days, ready for distilling in four
      > > days -if you have done everything as written. Result will be 7-12vol%,
      > > depending the starch level of potatoes.
      > >
      > > This is how I do it. There are many different ways too-but there are always
      > > four steps.
      > > 1. Softening the cellular walls.
      > > 2. Mashing the potatoes.
      > > In industrial scale steps one and two are usually done by using the
      > > HENZE-kettle, witch is basically a direct-steam heated pressure cooker
      > > (pressure is up to 8atm and the cooking time about 40min).
      > > 3. Converting the starch to maltose.
      > > 4. Fermenting.
      > > Notice that there are only those 2l of water added to mash, no more are
      > > required because the potatoes contains ¾ of water.
      > >
      > > P.S.
      > >
      > > If the wash is done right you should be able to distill it with a still that
      > > has an inner heating element -I have a 2kW inner (silver plated) heating
      > > element in mine.
      > >
      >
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