Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

What material for filtration column

Expand Messages
  • seymorehiney2
    Hi All, first post here. I have searched this group for info on what type of material to use for my activated carbon column. I read about copper, stainless and
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 27, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi All, first post here. I have searched this group for info on what type of material to use for my activated carbon column. I read about copper, stainless and i just saw a photo with black plastic plumbing pipe. I would very much like to use the plastic pipe because of the incredibly high cost of copper (and stainless)tubing right now. I have read about the issues of using plastic and rubber products with high % ethanol but I would be doing my purifying at below 50%. Any ideas for an inexpensive, easy to clean column material that will not break down or add off flavors or dangerous elements to my spirit would be greatly appreciated.
    • bp_murray
      here in NZ the commercial ones for home distillers are made from food grade plastic. I filter at ~50% so no issues that I m aware of, and they ve been selling
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 28, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        here in NZ the commercial ones for home distillers are made from food grade plastic. I filter at ~50% so no issues that I'm aware of, and they've been selling them in the shops for years.
      • Derek Hamlet
        ... These are my thoughts, not scientifically supported facts. Alcohol that sits on plastic for a long time at say 40% is not a good thing. Yes, I know
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 29, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          At 02:32 PM 3/28/2012, you wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >here in NZ the commercial ones for home distillers are made from
          >food grade plastic. I filter at ~50% so no issues that I'm aware of,
          >and they've been selling them in the shops for years.

          These are my thoughts, not scientifically supported facts. Alcohol
          that sits on plastic for a long time at say 40% is not a good
          thing. Yes, I know certain alcoholic beverages are sold in plastic
          containers. Do I trust the opinions of manufacturers about the
          safety of such things. Not bloody likely. On the other hand, when
          alcohol say 50%abv goes through a filter, the contact time is pretty
          darn quick. I have a electric wine filter that I use so my white
          wines are truly sparkling crystal clear. There are plastic
          parts. Contact time is seconds. I phoned the manufacturer and asked
          them if it would handle 40% abv without any discernible chemical
          interaction and they told me they had in fact done tests up to 40%
          and it was just fine. Given the time of contact, I'm willing to take
          that risk. It's sort of neat after doing all our fermenting and
          distilling to end up with a crystal clear product.
          OTOH, I would never ever ever filter a red wine. Natural settling
          and siphoning yes, but a filter will take out valuable products that
          contribute to positive aging of the wine, which is why modern
          filtered red wines don't really age or change very much. I document
          the change in taste in my reds out to about 15 years. After that, I
          just drink them.


          Derek
        • Kevin M
          If you are using plastic, you ll want to use PE (polyethylene) or PP (polypropylene) for the column.   For rubber seals, use EPDM (perxoxide cured if you
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 29, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            If you are using plastic, you'll want to use PE (polyethylene) or PP (polypropylene) for the column.
             
            For rubber seals, use EPDM (perxoxide cured if you have a choice). You can use teflon of course, but as its a plastic, it'll more readily take a 'set' after awhile of being tightened down in a fixture and thus may leak. 
             
            In general, always look for items that are NSF approved for potable water.
             
            These will be 'cleaner' than general purpose / industrial products.
             
             
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.