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Re: Going legal in NY, USA...is that easy?!

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  • penztoy
    If you take a look at Title 27 of the USC code, you can see the graduated scale of bond requirements. It depends on the amount you plan to produce during the
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 10, 2012
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      If you take a look at Title 27 of the USC code, you can see the graduated scale of bond requirements. It depends on the amount you plan to produce during the tax year as to how much "Bond amount" you need to post.
      The guys on Moonshiners have so many "wrong things shown" that I was able to just sit and type up pages of stuff that is actually dangerous and misinformation pertaining to distillation and mfg of alcohol. It got to be really funny. One such scenario showed Tim adding more sugar to an already distilling pot (Hot) and within minutes was making more alcohol? Really? Everyone knows the yeast would've been dead a long time prior to that and couldn't make anything from the addition off sugar except sweet hot water. They also showed Tim hot rodding his ol car to "run moonshine"... and they said it was a double carbed 400 cc. engine. Really? 400 cc huh? I have a motorcycle I ride on the street that my daughter learned on that has 600 ccc! and the double carb was a single 4 barrel autolite unit on a Pontiac engine that was actually a 400 Cu In. V-8.
      The show is literally riddled with misinformation. The bond is one such thing. The 200K is the highest bond amount listed and it's for a mfg facility that makes in excess of 1.2 million gallons of spirits per year! Hardly what either one of those clowns shown on TV are capable of.
      Just wanted to get that out there.

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Eddie Hoskin <eddie_hoskin@...> wrote:
      >
      > Might be a state licensing issue--up here in MI there's some permits that are $100 for fruit-based liquors.  Perhaps the easing of NY rules mentioned was getting rid of some of those bonds etc?
      >
      > Wouldn't strike me odd if they felt like stillers might go delinquent down in moonshine country :p.
      >
      > Tell you what I'll ask a buddy of mine who opened up a brewery/distillery on the other side of the state what his costs were.
      >
      > Eddie
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Matt Vegdahl <lorglath84@...>
      > To: distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, January 9, 2012 8:30 PM
      > Subject: RE: [Distillers] Going legal in NY, USA...is that easy?!
      >
      >
      >  
      > I agree that the equipment wouldn't cost that much.  I've been watching moonshiners on TV and I believe most of the show is BS, but one thing stuck out at me when he visited his friend running the legal distillery that had to have a cash bond with the state of $200k to be able to operate, so if he gets late on his taxes they have a 200k buffer.  So, this is the large investment I was referring to.
      >
      > -Matt
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > From: eddie_hoskin@...
      > Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2012 16:31:45 -0800
      > Subject: Re: [Distillers] Going legal in NY, USA...is that easy?!
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      > Well, as we all know, there's not that many equipment startup costs with basic distillation.  Getting a few 8 gallon stills, hotplates, fermenters is pretty manageable even on a shoestring budget.  Plus, notice that they had a 300 some odd sq ft distillery?  Plus a few more for tasting to total 600, but still damned small.
      >
      >
      > Being the first at anything give you a certain cache--especially in a 'trendy' town like NY.  One article stated that they were primarily sold at upscale liquor stores and bars.  I'm sure they're able to charge a large sum for their 200mL bottles, comparative to much else that's out there.
      >
      > My understanding is that, as long as you have a non-residential facility, it's actually not that hard to go legal.  The IRS loves their monies, and is very willing to help you give it to them.... ;)
      >
      >
      > Apparently they were doing so well though that they had to expand to a 7,000 sq ft building.  Must be doing something right!
      >
      > Eddie
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Matt Vegdahl <lorglath84@...>
      > To: distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, January 9, 2012 12:59 PM
      > Subject: RE: [Distillers] Going legal in NY, USA...is that easy?!
      >
      >
      >  
      > They must have been able to start up remarkably cheap if they can be profitable with such small scale production, any details anyone can find?
      >
      > -Matt
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > From: castillo.alex2008@...
      > Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2012 17:17:13 +0000
      > Subject: [Distillers] Going legal in NY, USA...is that easy?!
      >
      >  
      >
      > Hey people, look what I found!
      >
      > http://tinyurl.com/ydgprzd
      >
      > This people are legal and what make me laugh is that mostly they´re using equipment from bet where...brewhaus or mile hi I think. Don´t miss the video press they have in their page (that at time.com); they produce some 270 liters per month according to one press, and probably they learn from many of us, lol. Bet that many of us could do better things. If this people could do it, any of us can. Lol, only in America.
      >
      > Feedback from many of you living in US will be interesting. Hope our friend Jim (whereever he may be) could take a look at it too.
      >
      > Honey buy a ticket, we´re going to NY to distill... and legally, lol
      >
      > A!
      >
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