Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Forced temperature aging.

Expand Messages
  • G
    All of my brandys and rum I keep in oak and acacia casks in five to 30 litre volumes and I was reading that by warming and then chilling the casks, will
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 6, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      All of my brandys and rum I keep in oak and acacia casks in five to 30 litre volumes and I was reading that by warming and then chilling the casks, will substantially decrease the aging time required to achieve an äged product". It is winter where I live and current outside temps are about -10 deg C while inside the house is a nice warm 23 deg C. So I regularly bring the casks inside for a couple of day and then return them to the shed, which gives a temp diff of about 33 deg C.
      Has anyone else ever tried doing this and if so what results?

      Cheers

      Greg
    • Thursty2
      The commentary accompanying a video of the Jack Daniels distillery suggests that that is precisely what is done. At different times and seasons, the barrels
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 7, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        The commentary accompanying a video of the Jack Daniels distillery
        suggests that that is precisely what is done. At different times and seasons, the barrels are moved around to different floors in the multi storey aging buildings, where inside temps range from cool down in the cellars to hot several floors up.

        Cheers
        thursty2

        -------------------------

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "G" <gregclarkee@...> wrote:
        >
        > All of my brandys and rum I keep in oak and acacia casks in five to 30 litre volumes and I was reading that by warming and then chilling the casks, will substantially decrease the aging time required to achieve an äged product". It is winter where I live and current outside temps are about -10 deg C while inside the house is a nice warm 23 deg C. So I regularly bring the casks inside for a couple of day and then return them to the shed, which gives a temp diff of about 33 deg C.
        > Has anyone else ever tried doing this and if so what results?
        >
        > Cheers
        >
        > Greg
        >
      • tgfoitwoods
        Guys, I have done what I believe to be the same thing, that is varying the pressure of the liquid on the oak, causing the liquid to cycle in and out of the
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 7, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Guys,

          I have done what I believe to be the same thing, that is varying the  pressure of the liquid on the oak, causing the liquid to cycle in and out of the oak.

          I've only done it on the Mason jar scale, because that's all I can trust to handle the vacuum. I used a borrowed lab aspirator to generate the vacuum, and cycled about 2 hours on, 2 hours off. Repeat as necessary. It speeds up the coloring of the spirit, and appears to speed aging way up.

          For larger quantities, I may get a Corny keg, and dedicate it to aging. I'd guess a Corny would handle the vacuum an aspirator can pull.

          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits


           
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Thursty2" <thursty2@...> wrote:
          >
          > The commentary accompanying a video of the Jack Daniels distillery
          > suggests that that is precisely what is done. At different times and seasons, the barrels are moved around to different floors in the multi storey aging buildings, where inside temps range from cool down in the cellars to hot several floors up.
          >
          > Cheers
          > thursty2
          >
          > -------------------------
          >
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "G" gregclarkee@ wrote:
          > >
          > > All of my brandys and rum I keep in oak and acacia casks in five to 30 litre volumes and I was reading that by warming and then chilling the casks, will substantially decrease the aging time required to achieve an äged product". It is winter where I live and current outside temps are about -10 deg C while inside the house is a nice warm 23 deg C. So I regularly bring the casks inside for a couple of day and then return them to the shed, which gives a temp diff of about 33 deg C.
          > > Has anyone else ever tried doing this and if so what results?
          > >
          > > Cheers
          > >
          > > Greg
          > >
          >
        • geoff burrows
          I ve seen the big Scottish whisky distilleries do it when delivering barrels to them over a 2 week period delivery
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 8, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            I've seen the big Scottish whisky distilleries do it when delivering barrels to them over a 2 week period delivery  
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.