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Re: Horsefeed maize

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  • Harry
    ... Teach em to make their own. ;) Slainte! regards Harry
    Message 1 of 14 , May 12, 2011
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks"
      > <slipthruthecracks@> wrote:
      > >... Otherwise for the hobbyist, corn liquor is almost too much work
      > >
      > > Jack
      > >
      > Ain't that the serious jumped-up truth!! Forunately, I like barley-malt
      > whiskys better, and barley's way easier to work with than corn, but my
      > son and son-in-law are big bourbon fans, so what's a guy to do?
      >
      > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
      >


      Teach 'em to make their own. ;)


      Slainte!
      regards Harry
    • Peggy Korth
      I live in an area with thousands of horses. This is my question. Can the horse feed be used for alcohol and then use the remaining by-product/ c0-product to
      Message 2 of 14 , May 13, 2011
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        I live in an area with thousands of horses.  This is my question.  Can the horse feed be used for alcohol and then use the remaining by-product/ c0-product to feed back to the horses.  We understand that the increased distillers grains are good for cattle.  Has anyone heard about the nutritional value of horse-feed grains after we make alcohol?

        Thanks for any references or hints....  besides feed the horse and observe its behavior. 
        Peggy
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...>
        To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2011 1:14:57 PM
        Subject: [Distillers] Re: Horsefeed maize


        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks" <slipthruthecracks@...> wrote:
        >... Otherwise for the hobbyist, corn liquor is almost too much work
        >
        > Jack
        >
        Ain't that the serious jumped-up truth!! Forunately, I like barley-malt whiskys better, and barley's way easier to work with than corn, but my son and son-in-law are big bourbon fans, so what's a guy to do?

        Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
      • Joe Klaus
        Bad idea, i put my spent grains out by my bird feeder and the birds eat it and then they cant even fly straight and their falling out of the trees drunk, but
        Message 3 of 14 , May 13, 2011
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          Bad idea, i put my spent grains out by my bird feeder and the birds eat it and then they cant even fly straight and their falling out of the trees drunk, but they like it. But you do not want to give it to your horses, it will be sour, stink, and will hace alcohol left behind. You can reuse in another mash if you would like

          --- On Fri, 5/13/11, Peggy Korth <rpk@...> wrote:

          From: Peggy Korth <rpk@...>
          Subject: Re: [Distillers] Re: Horsefeed maize
          To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, May 13, 2011, 8:20 PM

           
          I live in an area with thousands of horses.  This is my question.  Can the horse feed be used for alcohol and then use the remaining by-product/ c0-product to feed back to the horses.  We understand that the increased distillers grains are good for cattle.  Has anyone heard about the nutritional value of horse-feed grains after we make alcohol?

          Thanks for any references or hints....  besides feed the horse and observe its behavior. 
          Peggy
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...>
          To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2011 1:14:57 PM
          Subject: [Distillers] Re: Horsefeed maize


          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks" <slipthruthecracks@...> wrote:
          >... Otherwise for the hobbyist, corn liquor is almost too much work
          >
          > Jack
          >
          Ain't that the serious jumped-up truth!! Forunately, I like barley-malt whiskys better, and barley's way easier to work with than corn, but my son and son-in-law are big bourbon fans, so what's a guy to do?

          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
        • CRSound
          Yes Sir You are fine,, I to live in an area full of horse barns, and we have a natural feed producer we get our grain from. There are no additives, and the
          Message 4 of 14 , May 13, 2011
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            Yes Sir You are fine,, I to live in an area full of horse barns, and we have a natural feed producer we get our grain from.
            There are no additives, and the resulting grain the horses like, also makes a dang good all grain recipe. Pre Boil due to no steam flaking.
            Over The Rail N' Down The Hatch,
            CRSound
          • slipthruthecracks
            ... Peggy, I have not had a problem feeding my spent grains to my farm animals. My chickens especially love the spent corn. I mix it with their meal. Unlike
            Message 5 of 14 , May 15, 2011
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              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Peggy Korth <rpk@...> wrote:
              >
              > I live in an area with thousands of horses. This is my question. Can the horse feed be used for alcohol and then use the remaining by-product/ c0-product to feed back to the horses. We understand that the increased distillers grains are good for cattle. Has anyone heard about the nutritional value of horse-feed grains after we make alcohol?
              >
              > Thanks for any references or hints.... besides feed the horse and observe its behavior.
              > Peggy


              Peggy,

              I have not had a problem feeding my spent grains to my farm animals. My chickens especially love the spent corn. I mix it with their meal. Unlike Joe, I have not had a problem with the birds or other animals feeling the effects of residual alcohol. But, again, I think I may be in the minority in that I press my mash in my cider press and end up with a semi-dry cake.

              Around here, large chicken operations dry their manure prior to selling it to processing plants for fertilizer or before spreading it on nearby fields. The driers are not cheap to install or operate and would not be cost effective for small amounts of spent grains. But, if you have a significant amount due to the processing you do for fuel alcohol, it could be worth it if you can then sell the spent grains for feed. Or, if you have enough to make it worth it, perhaps, a farmer near you might operate a drier that he would let you use with or even better that he would use himself to dry your grains before feeding to his own stock.

              Jack
            • Peggy Korth
              Thanks for the drying info. Jack. I will look into alternatives for drying. - Peggy, I have not had a problem feeding my spent grains to my farm animals. My
              Message 6 of 14 , May 16, 2011
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                Thanks for the drying info. Jack. I will look into alternatives for drying.
                -

                Peggy,

                I have not had a problem feeding my spent grains to my farm animals. My chickens especially love the spent corn. I mix it with their meal. Unlike Joe, I have not had a problem with the birds or other animals feeling the effects of residual alcohol. But, again, I think I may be in the minority in that I press my mash in my cider press and end up with a semi-dry cake.

                Around here, large chicken operations dry their manure prior to selling it to processing plants for fertilizer or before spreading it on nearby fields. The driers are not cheap to install or operate and would not be cost effective for small amounts of spent grains. But, if you have a significant amount due to the processing you do for fuel alcohol, it could be worth it if you can then sell the spent grains for feed. Or, if you have enough to make it worth it, perhaps, a farmer near you might operate a drier that he would let you use with or even better that he would use himself to dry your grains before feeding to his own stock.

                Jack
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