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Re: Horsefeed maize

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  • Thursty2
    ... Hi OneEyeJack, Great How To . Much appreciated. You say you grind the flaked maize. Is this an adopted step in the process? I m led to believe that
    Message 1 of 14 , May 10, 2011
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks" <slipthruthecracks@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thursty2,
      >
      > Flaked corn is what I use to make my bourbon. It is gelatinized already, sparing you the problem of boiling to gelatinize the starch. I grind it and add it slowly (stirring all the time) to water that I have brought to a boil and then turned off the heat. It becomes a thick porridge. Once mixed, I allow it to cool to mashing temp before adding my barley malt which has the enzymes needed to convert the the starches to sugar. As I add the malt, the porridge thins almost immediately as the corn breaks down and releases its sugars. Once mixed I allow to cool to pitching temp and add my yeast. I stir down the cap daily and then press the mash in my cider press to get as much liquid separated from the spent mash as possible. Then strip and run for taste. Good stuff.
      >
      > OneEyedJack

      Hi OneEyeJack,

      Great "How To". Much appreciated.
      You say you grind the flaked maize. Is this an adopted step in the process? I'm led to believe that grinding is uneccesary for flaked maize.

      thursty2
    • thepatchworkdoll
      Hi Thursty2 how clean/clear is your wash when you still it. Do you still right after fermentation is finished or do you let it stand until reasonably clear.
      Message 2 of 14 , May 11, 2011
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        Hi Thursty2 how clean/clear is your wash when you still it. Do you still right after fermentation is finished or do you let it stand until reasonably clear. Any info realy appreciated.
        Regards
        Patch

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Thursty2" <thursty2@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks" <slipthruthecracks@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Thursty2,
        > >
        > > Flaked corn is what I use to make my bourbon. It is gelatinized already, sparing you the problem of boiling to gelatinize the starch. I grind it and add it slowly (stirring all the time) to water that I have brought to a boil and then turned off the heat. It becomes a thick porridge. Once mixed, I allow it to cool to mashing temp before adding my barley malt which has the enzymes needed to convert the the starches to sugar. As I add the malt, the porridge thins almost immediately as the corn breaks down and releases its sugars. Once mixed I allow to cool to pitching temp and add my yeast. I stir down the cap daily and then press the mash in my cider press to get as much liquid separated from the spent mash as possible. Then strip and run for taste. Good stuff.
        > >
        > > OneEyedJack
        >
        > Hi OneEyeJack,
        >
        > Great "How To". Much appreciated.
        > You say you grind the flaked maize. Is this an adopted step in the process? I'm led to believe that grinding is uneccesary for flaked maize.
        >
        > thursty2
        >
      • slipthruthecracks
        ... Grinding is likely unnecessary. With no testing or scientific basis, I am trying to maximize conversion by exposing more surface area of the grain to my
        Message 3 of 14 , May 12, 2011
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          > Hi OneEyeJack,
          >
          > Great "How To". Much appreciated.
          > You say you grind the flaked maize. Is this an adopted step in the process? I'm led to believe that grinding is uneccesary for flaked maize.
          >
          > thursty2
          >

          Grinding is likely unnecessary. With no testing or scientific basis, I am trying to maximize conversion by exposing more surface area of the grain to my mashing liquid. I read somewhere else that someone was getting good results this way, and I have been happy. I don't like to add sugar so maximum conversion is essential. Otherwise for the hobbyist, corn liquor is almost too much work

          Jack
        • slipthruthecracks
          ... Patch, Not sure if you were asking Thursty2 or meant me. Due to my pressing process to extract liquid, nearly all the solids are out of my wash. My strip
          Message 4 of 14 , May 12, 2011
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            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "thepatchworkdoll" <peter.coleman20@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Thursty2 how clean/clear is your wash when you still it. Do you still right after fermentation is finished or do you let it stand until reasonably clear. Any info realy appreciated.
            > Regards
            > Patch
            >

            Patch,

            Not sure if you were asking Thursty2 or meant me.

            Due to my pressing process to extract liquid, nearly all the solids are out of my wash. My strip run is made with a very sticky whitish yellowish cloudy liquid. Since I extract the liquid, clearing is less of an issue for me than it might be if I was waiting for complete settling of the spent corn and barley (which I am not sure would ever happen). Once fermentation stops, I do the stripping at first convenient opportunity.

            Jack
          • tgfoitwoods
            ... Ain t that the serious jumped-up truth!! Forunately, I like barley-malt whiskys better, and barley s way easier to work with than corn, but my son and
            Message 5 of 14 , May 12, 2011
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              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks" <slipthruthecracks@...> wrote:
              >... Otherwise for the hobbyist, corn liquor is almost too much work
              >
              > Jack
              >
              Ain't that the serious jumped-up truth!! Forunately, I like barley-malt whiskys better, and barley's way easier to work with than corn, but my son and son-in-law are big bourbon fans, so what's a guy to do?

              Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
            • Harry
              ... Teach em to make their own. ;) Slainte! regards Harry
              Message 6 of 14 , May 12, 2011
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                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks"
                > <slipthruthecracks@> wrote:
                > >... Otherwise for the hobbyist, corn liquor is almost too much work
                > >
                > > Jack
                > >
                > Ain't that the serious jumped-up truth!! Forunately, I like barley-malt
                > whiskys better, and barley's way easier to work with than corn, but my
                > son and son-in-law are big bourbon fans, so what's a guy to do?
                >
                > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                >


                Teach 'em to make their own. ;)


                Slainte!
                regards Harry
              • Peggy Korth
                I live in an area with thousands of horses. This is my question. Can the horse feed be used for alcohol and then use the remaining by-product/ c0-product to
                Message 7 of 14 , May 13, 2011
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                  I live in an area with thousands of horses.  This is my question.  Can the horse feed be used for alcohol and then use the remaining by-product/ c0-product to feed back to the horses.  We understand that the increased distillers grains are good for cattle.  Has anyone heard about the nutritional value of horse-feed grains after we make alcohol?

                  Thanks for any references or hints....  besides feed the horse and observe its behavior. 
                  Peggy
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...>
                  To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2011 1:14:57 PM
                  Subject: [Distillers] Re: Horsefeed maize


                  --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks" <slipthruthecracks@...> wrote:
                  >... Otherwise for the hobbyist, corn liquor is almost too much work
                  >
                  > Jack
                  >
                  Ain't that the serious jumped-up truth!! Forunately, I like barley-malt whiskys better, and barley's way easier to work with than corn, but my son and son-in-law are big bourbon fans, so what's a guy to do?

                  Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                • Joe Klaus
                  Bad idea, i put my spent grains out by my bird feeder and the birds eat it and then they cant even fly straight and their falling out of the trees drunk, but
                  Message 8 of 14 , May 13, 2011
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                    Bad idea, i put my spent grains out by my bird feeder and the birds eat it and then they cant even fly straight and their falling out of the trees drunk, but they like it. But you do not want to give it to your horses, it will be sour, stink, and will hace alcohol left behind. You can reuse in another mash if you would like

                    --- On Fri, 5/13/11, Peggy Korth <rpk@...> wrote:

                    From: Peggy Korth <rpk@...>
                    Subject: Re: [Distillers] Re: Horsefeed maize
                    To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Friday, May 13, 2011, 8:20 PM

                     
                    I live in an area with thousands of horses.  This is my question.  Can the horse feed be used for alcohol and then use the remaining by-product/ c0-product to feed back to the horses.  We understand that the increased distillers grains are good for cattle.  Has anyone heard about the nutritional value of horse-feed grains after we make alcohol?

                    Thanks for any references or hints....  besides feed the horse and observe its behavior. 
                    Peggy
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...>
                    To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2011 1:14:57 PM
                    Subject: [Distillers] Re: Horsefeed maize


                    --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks" <slipthruthecracks@...> wrote:
                    >... Otherwise for the hobbyist, corn liquor is almost too much work
                    >
                    > Jack
                    >
                    Ain't that the serious jumped-up truth!! Forunately, I like barley-malt whiskys better, and barley's way easier to work with than corn, but my son and son-in-law are big bourbon fans, so what's a guy to do?

                    Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                  • CRSound
                    Yes Sir You are fine,, I to live in an area full of horse barns, and we have a natural feed producer we get our grain from. There are no additives, and the
                    Message 9 of 14 , May 13, 2011
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                      Yes Sir You are fine,, I to live in an area full of horse barns, and we have a natural feed producer we get our grain from.
                      There are no additives, and the resulting grain the horses like, also makes a dang good all grain recipe. Pre Boil due to no steam flaking.
                      Over The Rail N' Down The Hatch,
                      CRSound
                    • slipthruthecracks
                      ... Peggy, I have not had a problem feeding my spent grains to my farm animals. My chickens especially love the spent corn. I mix it with their meal. Unlike
                      Message 10 of 14 , May 15, 2011
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                        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Peggy Korth <rpk@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I live in an area with thousands of horses. This is my question. Can the horse feed be used for alcohol and then use the remaining by-product/ c0-product to feed back to the horses. We understand that the increased distillers grains are good for cattle. Has anyone heard about the nutritional value of horse-feed grains after we make alcohol?
                        >
                        > Thanks for any references or hints.... besides feed the horse and observe its behavior.
                        > Peggy


                        Peggy,

                        I have not had a problem feeding my spent grains to my farm animals. My chickens especially love the spent corn. I mix it with their meal. Unlike Joe, I have not had a problem with the birds or other animals feeling the effects of residual alcohol. But, again, I think I may be in the minority in that I press my mash in my cider press and end up with a semi-dry cake.

                        Around here, large chicken operations dry their manure prior to selling it to processing plants for fertilizer or before spreading it on nearby fields. The driers are not cheap to install or operate and would not be cost effective for small amounts of spent grains. But, if you have a significant amount due to the processing you do for fuel alcohol, it could be worth it if you can then sell the spent grains for feed. Or, if you have enough to make it worth it, perhaps, a farmer near you might operate a drier that he would let you use with or even better that he would use himself to dry your grains before feeding to his own stock.

                        Jack
                      • Peggy Korth
                        Thanks for the drying info. Jack. I will look into alternatives for drying. - Peggy, I have not had a problem feeding my spent grains to my farm animals. My
                        Message 11 of 14 , May 16, 2011
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                          Thanks for the drying info. Jack. I will look into alternatives for drying.
                          -

                          Peggy,

                          I have not had a problem feeding my spent grains to my farm animals. My chickens especially love the spent corn. I mix it with their meal. Unlike Joe, I have not had a problem with the birds or other animals feeling the effects of residual alcohol. But, again, I think I may be in the minority in that I press my mash in my cider press and end up with a semi-dry cake.

                          Around here, large chicken operations dry their manure prior to selling it to processing plants for fertilizer or before spreading it on nearby fields. The driers are not cheap to install or operate and would not be cost effective for small amounts of spent grains. But, if you have a significant amount due to the processing you do for fuel alcohol, it could be worth it if you can then sell the spent grains for feed. Or, if you have enough to make it worth it, perhaps, a farmer near you might operate a drier that he would let you use with or even better that he would use himself to dry your grains before feeding to his own stock.

                          Jack
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