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Re: [Distillers] Making Gin

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  • Bryan Bornais
    My recipe goes something like this: x = Juniper berries x/2 = ground corriander x/10 = cinnamon x/10 = Licorice root x/10 = Almonds x/10 = Angelica root x/100
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 6, 2011
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      My recipe goes something like this:

      x = Juniper berries
      x/2 = ground corriander
      x/10 = cinnamon
      x/10 = Licorice root
      x/10 = Almonds
      x/10 = Angelica root
      x/100 = Fresh Lemon peel
      x/100 = Calamus root
      x/100 = Orris root

      If x = 100g Juniper, procidure is such:

      Grind spices in blender.

      Steam distillation on stovetop in a tea pot or converted pressure cooker for a boiler.

      Add 1L of 80 proof neutral alcohol, and collect a 750mL bottle of it.

      Blend to taste with 80 proof neutral alcohol. Shake up martini.

      For longer storage of the essence, add some azeotropic ethanol distillate to boost the ABV to over 70%. This will keep the essential oils in solution.

      Store concentrate out of light.

      Martini Preference: Shaken, not stirred.



      From: eyendall <eric_yendall@...>
      To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sun, February 6, 2011 4:43:08 PM
      Subject: [Distillers] Making Gin

       

      I would like to try my hand at making (distilling) gin but am a bit confused from my search of the posts as to the actual technique. I don't want to simply add a commercial essence to my distilled neutral spirit.
      Am I right in assuming that I first distill to a neutral alcohol; steep various botanicals in this for some specified period; then finally redistill the resultant liquid?
      Could someone walk me through the process i.e. best formula (grains, sugar or what) for the original wash; tried and true botanicals recipe; duration of maceration in what % alcohol; when to make the correct cuts of the secondary distillation etc. Have I got the steps more or less correct? I have tried to find this information through the search function but must not be using the correct search terms.
      An apparent alternative is to distill one's own concentrated essence for adding to neutral alcohol. Which is the preferred and most efficient technique?
      Thanks to all for your help.


    • tgfoitwoods
      Whoof! A guy s gone for a few days and the group explodes! Eyendall, Part of your confusion comes from the fact that there is no one single way to make gin.
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 7, 2011
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        Whoof! A guy's gone for a few days and the group explodes!

        Eyendall,

        Part of your confusion comes from the fact that there is no one single way to make gin. Some distillers use a "berry head", which holds the botanicals while the hot ethanol/water vapor passes through them, while some distillers simply add the botanicals to the boiler with clean neutral alcohol, and collect the distillate.

        It looks like Bryan and I both use variants of the latter method. In my case, because I was afraid of the very strong gin flavor"poisoning" the copper of my whisky/brandy/rum still, I use less neutral and get a very strong gin concentrate, which I dilute later with neutral.

        It also looks like I got my botanicals list from the same source as Bryan, a list that Wal posted here a few years ago. I'll include the text of that list and at the very end is my recipe and procedure for making gin.

        Just to confuse the issue, I just tasted a couple of gins from New Deal Distillers that were juniper-only, and they were excellent.

        Whatever route you choose, Bryan's method and mine will both give you fine gins, but slightly different gins.

        Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

        ***************INCLUDED GIN TABLES AND BOB'S RECIPE***************************
        WITH BOB'S GIN EXTRACT RECIPE

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:

        I have also found the botanicals used for the French Citadelle Gin.
        This 1771 recipe from Dunkirk has 19 botanicals which is the biggest
        number among current gins.

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:

        >> Just found the botanicals for a Dutch gin - Van Gogh Gin.
        >> --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        >
        >>> > Msg 13359 has commercial gin recipes mainly from the 19th

        century.

        >>> > This gives an idea of the botanicals and their quantity used.
        >>> > With the aim of formulating a standard model for gin botanical

        quantities for the homedistiller, here is a table of the botanicals
        used in 10 modern gins:

        >>> > 1)Tiger Gin
        >>> > 2)Gordon's Distilled London Dry Gin
        >>> > 3)Beefeater London Distilled Dry Gin
        >>> > 4)Plymouth Gin
        >>> > 5)Bombay Distilled London Dry Gin
        >>> > 6)Bombay Sapphire Distilled London Dry Gin
        >>> > 7)Mercury Gin
        >>> > 8)Juniper Green London Dry Gin
        >>> > 9)Van Gogh Gin (Holland)
        >>> >10)Citadelle Gin (France)
        >
        >>
        >> 
        >
        >>> > Botanicals used-------Gin Brand (see above)
        >>> > ---------------------1---2---3---4---5---6---7---8---9---10---
        >>> > Juniper-------------yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-
        >>> > Coriander-----------yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-
        >>> > Angelica root-------yes-----yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-
        >>> > Cassia--------------yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-
        >>> > Cinnamon------------yes---------------------------------yes-
        >>> > Liquorice-----------yes-----yes-----yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-
        >>> > Bitter almonds----------------------yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-
        >>> > Grains of Paradise----------------------yes---------yes-yes-
        >>> > Cubeb berries---------------------------yes---------yes-yes-
        >>> > Bitter orange peel----------yes-----------------------------
        >>> > Sweet orange peel---yes---------yes---------yes---------yes-
        >>> > Lemon peel----------yes-----yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-
        >>> > Ginger------------------yes---------------------------------
        >>> > Orris root----------yes---------yes-yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-
        >>> > Cardamon------------yes---------yes---------------------yes-
        >>> > Nutmeg--------------yes-yes-----------------------------yes-
        >>> > Savory------------------------------------------yes-----yes-
        >>> > Calamus (sweet flag)----------------------------------------
        >>> > Chamomile---------------------------------------------------
        >>> > Violet root---------------------------------------------yes-
        >>> > Cumin---------------------------------------------------yes-
        >>> > Aniseed-------------------------------------------------yes-
        >>> > Fennel seed---------------------------------------------yes-


        >>> > The total amount of botanicals used is about 20-35 grams/litre.
        >>> > If we take the dominant botanical juniper as 'x', the proportions

         of the botanicals used is:

        >>> > x = juniper
        >>> > x/2 = coriander
        >>> > x/10 = angelica, cassia, cinnamon, liquorice, bitter almonds,
        >
        >> grains  of paradise, cubeb berries
        >
        >>> > x/100 = bitter & sweet orange peel, lemon peel, ginger, orris

        root, cardamon, nutmeg, savory, calamus, chamomile, fennel, aniseed,
        cumin, violet root.

        >>> > If we use x = 20g then x/2 = 10g, x/10 = 2g, x/100 = 0.2g (200mg)
        >>> > Some current gins do not have a pronounced juniper character as

        they are used for cocktails and are more of a flavored vodka - for
        this type of gin for 'x' use equal quantities for juniper &
        coriander  (i.e. x = 20g composed of 10g of juniper & 10g of
        coriander)

        >>> >
        >>> > The botanical are macerated in 45%abv neutral alcohol (usually

        for 24 hours), redistilled and then diluted to 42%abv which is an
        optimal strength for holding the flavour of the botanicals. Only the
        middle run (80-85%abv) is used to produce a high quality gin.
        Plymouth Gin also comes in a 57%abv 'Navy Strength' and which is also
        the British 100 proof strength.

        >>> > Bombay Sapphire Gin uses a Carterhead Still which contains a 

        botanicals basket through which the vapour passes, a technique which
        gives a lighter flavour.

        >>> > All gins include juniper and coriander as an ingredient along 

        with other botanicals. Typically a fine gin contains 6-10 botanicals,
        although the Dutch Damask Gin has 17, and the French Citadelle Gin
        has 19 - but this could be more for marketing reasons and has been
        criticised  for lacking direction.

        >>> > Some American gins mention chamomile as a botanical which would

        give a blue tinge to the gin.


        >>> > Botanical names:
        >>> > juniper - juniperis communis
        >>> > coriander - coriandrum sativum
        >>> > angelica - archangelica officinalis
        >>> > cassia - cinnamonum cassia
        >>> > cinnamon - cinnamonum zeylanicum
        >>> > liquorice - glycyrriza glabra
        >>> > bitter almond - prunus dulcis, amara
        >>> > grains of paradise - afromumum melegueta
        >>> > cubeb berries - piper cubeb
        >>> > bitter orange - citrus aurantium
        >>> > sweet orange - citrus sinensis
        >>> > lemon - citrus limon
        >>> > ginger - zinziber officinalis
        >>> > orris root - iris florentina
        >>> > cardamon - elletaria cardamomum
        >>> > nutmeg - myristica fragrans
        >>> > savory - satureja hortensis
        >>> > calamus - acorus calamus
        >>> > chamomile - matricaria chamomilla
        >>> > violet root - viola odorata
        >>> > cumin - cuminum cyminum
        >>> > aniseed - pimpinella anisum
        >>> > fennel - foeniculum vulgare
        >>> >
        >>> > The usual mash for English gin is 75% maize, 15% barley malt and

         10% other grains, although rectified spirit from molasses is also
        used.

        >>> > Dutch gin originally was made from 1/3 malted barley and 2/3 rye

        meal, although these days the proportions given is 1/3 malted barley,
        1/3 rye, 1/3 maize.

        >>> >
        >>> > Wal
        >>> > (Keep in mind the suggested formula has been based on published
        >>> > material and not on experience.)


        BOB'S GIN EXTRACT#2

        In quart jar, put:

        Juniper, 1 level cup, 80 grams
        Coriander, heaping half cup, 44 grams
        Cinnamon, 4 grams (62 grains)
        Pepper cracked, .3 grams (5 grains)
        Lemon peel, .8 grams (12 grains) ~1 1/4" strip
        Cardamom pods, .8 grams (5 pods)

        Cover with 40% abv "vodka".

        Let stand 10 days.  Distill in wee stovetop still until most of the flavor stops comming across (cinnamon flavor will be last).

        Use one part distillate to 8 parts neutral EtOH, or vodka.







        ***********************END INCLUDED TEXT*************************************
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "eyendall" <eric_yendall@...> wrote:
        >
        > I would like to try my hand at making (distilling) gin but am a bit confused from my search of the posts as to the actual technique. I don't want to simply add a commercial essence to my distilled neutral spirit.
        > Am I right in assuming that I first distill to a neutral alcohol; steep various botanicals in this for some specified period; then finally redistill the resultant liquid?
        > Could someone walk me through the process i.e. best formula (grains, sugar or what) for the original wash; tried and true botanicals recipe; duration of maceration in what % alcohol; when to make the correct cuts of the secondary distillation etc. Have I got the steps more or less correct? I have tried to find this information through the search function but must not be using the correct search terms.
        > An apparent alternative is to distill one's own concentrated essence for adding to neutral alcohol. Which is the preferred and most efficient technique?
        > Thanks to all for your help.
        >
      • mav
        Nicely explained Bryan, I think I might try this recipe / method when time permits. Cheers Marc
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 9, 2011
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          Nicely explained Bryan, I think I might try this recipe / method when time permits.

          Cheers
          Marc


          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Bryan Bornais <bbornais@...> wrote:
          >
          > My recipe goes something like this:
          >
          > x = Juniper berries
          > x/2 = ground corriander
          > x/10 = cinnamon
          > x/10 = Licorice root
          > x/10 = Almonds
          > x/10 = Angelica root
          > x/100 = Fresh Lemon peel
          > x/100 = Calamus root
          > x/100 = Orris root
          >
          > If x = 100g Juniper, procidure is such:
          >
          > Grind spices in blender.
          >
          > Steam distillation on stovetop in a tea pot or converted pressure cooker for a
          > boiler.
          >
          > Add 1L of 80 proof neutral alcohol, and collect a 750mL bottle of it.
          >
          > Blend to taste with 80 proof neutral alcohol. Shake up martini.
          >
          > For longer storage of the essence, add some azeotropic ethanol distillate to
          > boost the ABV to over 70%. This will keep the essential oils in solution.
          >
          > Store concentrate out of light.
          >
          > Martini Preference: Shaken, not stirred.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: eyendall <eric_yendall@...>
          > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Sun, February 6, 2011 4:43:08 PM
          > Subject: [Distillers] Making Gin
          >
          >
          > I would like to try my hand at making (distilling) gin but am a bit confused

          >> Thanks to all for your help.
          >
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