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Re: Other yeasts for rum

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  • Alex Castillo
    Hey Jim, When do you know the MLF is over? Been doing some research for heavy rum and found that molasses have lots of malic acid ( some 2.9 %) P.D. This is
    Message 1 of 50 , Dec 13, 2010
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      Hey Jim,

      When do you know the MLF is over? Been doing some research for heavy rum and found that molasses have lots of malic acid ( some 2.9 %)

      P.D. This is very quiet, probably since many of the members are from snow-winter´s countries. (It´s an adventage to live in a country where you could go to the beach in December, lol)
    • waljaco
      Normally there is enough lactic bacteria in the air - just leave some milk out and see what happens. Some strains can actually spoil wine. Look up malo-lactic
      Message 50 of 50 , Feb 10, 2011
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        Normally there is enough lactic bacteria in the air - just leave some milk out and see what happens. Some strains can actually spoil wine. Look up malo-lactic fermentation. In Jamaica they just leave dunder to mother nature.
        wal

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mav" <mavnkaf@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks Alex for your very detailed reply.
        >
        > I have no problems with aging my dunder but I was curious to hear about the end result, like what difference does it make to the final spirit? Or, does it improve the mouth feel? And so on.
        >
        > I have a probiotic drink called "inner gy", made by Vaalia. It has Lactobacillus GG, Bifidobacterium and L.Acidophilus. So I'll try using it to see what happens with about 60 L of molasses wash. If any thing good comes out of it, I'll post back here.
        >
        > Cheers
        > Marc
        >
        >
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Alex Castillo" <castillo.alex2008@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Hey Marc
        > >
        > > In fact that aged dunder (almost two months now) is resting in a HDPE 20 liters bucket in my "lab" since (by accident) I discovered that just "abandoning" some dunder in a fermenter gets aged in no time (days) and I observed the same "infection" (white film/cap on top of dunder) that the one I observed in the yogurt/cheese infected dunder pit; so now instead I´m working on the "naturally aged" dunder. Even using the cap part fermented good: nice aroma and increased yield! now after the spirit run that booze is aging with american + french oaks (some at around 60% and some other at 83% ABV for lacking room in the glass jug); that natural quick aging maybe happens around here b/c we´re in the tropics (around here people turn ACs in February, lol so is hot!) so after aging and diluting I´ll let you know about the taste.
        > >
        > > In the other hand, if you are in a cold weather and want to promote MLF in your dunder or wash those lactic bateria are very affordable in pure form. You want two kinds: lactic and propionic bacteria; better a cocktail of them all. here are the ones you can get:
        > >
        > > Set 1:
        > > s.lactis, s. cremoris, s. lactis biovar diacetylactis, m.s. cremoris (those four are called "flora danica" run for US$15.95
        > >
        > > Set 2:
        > > l. acidophilus, bifidobacterium species, s.thermophilus, l.delbrueckii, those are for "sweet yogurt" US$5.95/pack
        > >
        > > Set 3:
        > > same as above but includes s. bulgaricus and s.lactis for "tangy" yogurt, again US$5.95/pack
        > >
        > > Set 4:
        > > Propionic shermanii, for US$12.95 (this is the one responsible for the "eyes" of swiss cheese).
        > >
        > > Set 5:
        > > s.thermophilus, d.s. lactis, s. helveticus (these are the ones used for Italian cheese such as Parmesan, Mozzarella, etc.) those for US$ 5.95 pack
        > >
        > > s.= Streptococcus; l.= lactobacillus
        > >
        > > I found those here: http://tinyurl.com/27l5hpo
        > >
        > >
        > > Lactic fermentation occurs in the surface of the fermentation.
        > > Clarify your wash for eliminating the probability of other yeasts or bateria to take part of the "party", or don´t if you want they (and clostridium which are bacteria from soil) take part. I´ve done both.
        > > So
        > > You may either ferment your dunder or give your wash a double fermentation. (if using this second technique pull for no more than 1.060 SG or simply the amount of alcohol won´t let bacteria develop. Just dump ´em after yeast fermentation is over (1.020 for molasses wash in my case), wait ´til the cap appears (´round one week) then distill.
        > >
        > > Molasses do have malic acid which will turn to lactic acid.(if using much brown sugar simply peel/mash and add an apple for malic acid, I´ve heared they do it in dunder pits in Jamaica, but hard to beleive).
        > >
        > > According to Fahrasmane and Ganou-Parfait (people for INRA who isolated EDV 493) lactic fermentation are even more important than yeast for the flavor of rum, specially propionic which gives a "terroir" booze.
        > >
        > > I warn you though that MLF may produce ethyl carbamate which is a known carcinogenic, but in the other hand it has been detected even in whiskey.
        > >
        > > Now go for a great rum!
        > >
        > > HTH
        > >
        > > Alex
        > >
        >
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