Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Other yeasts for rum

Expand Messages
  • castillo.alex2008
    Hi everyone 1. After reading a review by Fahrasmane from INRA (the people who isolated Danstill EDV 493) and other publications (including Arroyo)
    Message 1 of 50 , Nov 14, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi everyone

      1. After reading a review by Fahrasmane from INRA (the people who isolated Danstill EDV 493) and other publications (including Arroyo) Schizosaccharomyces Pombe is a yeast strain that deserves a try since many good rums in the caribbean which rely in wild yeast use it. After those readings I have realized that S. Pombe could not only be in the air of caribbean island but in the molasses itself and also many bacterias and other yeast too. My question goes in the direction of asking if anyone have tried to dissolve molasses in water, cover it with an airlock tap and let those "wild" agents convert the sugar present into alcohol and lots of other congeners (esters, etc.) Does it sound that worths a try? Once after the first fermentation/distillation one may begin "ranching" those wild yeasts and aging its dunder, of course if the results are acceptable. I assume that the fermentation will be much longer than the ones we´re already used to.

      2. Who has experience fermenting/distilling with the following strains (Lalvin´s): 71B-1122 (said to produce isoamyl acetate aka banana smell/flavor); RC-212 and ICV D-47 (said to contribute with citric and pinneapple notes). Notice please that I already read what lalvin says about them, so an input from someone who actually used the strains is what I´m looking for.

      3.Finally Lalvin writes about ol´ K1-V1116 "When fermented at low temperatures (below 16°C) and with the right addition of nutrients, ICV-K1
      is one of the more floral ester producing yeast (isoamyl acetate, hexyl acetate, phenyl ethyl
      acetate). These esters bring fresh, floral aromas to neutral varieties or high yield grapes."

      I have used this yeast but never noticed those esters (most probably b/c I´m in the tropics with an average temp of 30C almost the whole year) Does anyone has noticed those floral aromas? Does it worth to carry a fermentation in my refrigerator instead?

      Thanks people

      Alex
    • waljaco
      Normally there is enough lactic bacteria in the air - just leave some milk out and see what happens. Some strains can actually spoil wine. Look up malo-lactic
      Message 50 of 50 , Feb 10, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Normally there is enough lactic bacteria in the air - just leave some milk out and see what happens. Some strains can actually spoil wine. Look up malo-lactic fermentation. In Jamaica they just leave dunder to mother nature.
        wal

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mav" <mavnkaf@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks Alex for your very detailed reply.
        >
        > I have no problems with aging my dunder but I was curious to hear about the end result, like what difference does it make to the final spirit? Or, does it improve the mouth feel? And so on.
        >
        > I have a probiotic drink called "inner gy", made by Vaalia. It has Lactobacillus GG, Bifidobacterium and L.Acidophilus. So I'll try using it to see what happens with about 60 L of molasses wash. If any thing good comes out of it, I'll post back here.
        >
        > Cheers
        > Marc
        >
        >
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Alex Castillo" <castillo.alex2008@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Hey Marc
        > >
        > > In fact that aged dunder (almost two months now) is resting in a HDPE 20 liters bucket in my "lab" since (by accident) I discovered that just "abandoning" some dunder in a fermenter gets aged in no time (days) and I observed the same "infection" (white film/cap on top of dunder) that the one I observed in the yogurt/cheese infected dunder pit; so now instead I´m working on the "naturally aged" dunder. Even using the cap part fermented good: nice aroma and increased yield! now after the spirit run that booze is aging with american + french oaks (some at around 60% and some other at 83% ABV for lacking room in the glass jug); that natural quick aging maybe happens around here b/c we´re in the tropics (around here people turn ACs in February, lol so is hot!) so after aging and diluting I´ll let you know about the taste.
        > >
        > > In the other hand, if you are in a cold weather and want to promote MLF in your dunder or wash those lactic bateria are very affordable in pure form. You want two kinds: lactic and propionic bacteria; better a cocktail of them all. here are the ones you can get:
        > >
        > > Set 1:
        > > s.lactis, s. cremoris, s. lactis biovar diacetylactis, m.s. cremoris (those four are called "flora danica" run for US$15.95
        > >
        > > Set 2:
        > > l. acidophilus, bifidobacterium species, s.thermophilus, l.delbrueckii, those are for "sweet yogurt" US$5.95/pack
        > >
        > > Set 3:
        > > same as above but includes s. bulgaricus and s.lactis for "tangy" yogurt, again US$5.95/pack
        > >
        > > Set 4:
        > > Propionic shermanii, for US$12.95 (this is the one responsible for the "eyes" of swiss cheese).
        > >
        > > Set 5:
        > > s.thermophilus, d.s. lactis, s. helveticus (these are the ones used for Italian cheese such as Parmesan, Mozzarella, etc.) those for US$ 5.95 pack
        > >
        > > s.= Streptococcus; l.= lactobacillus
        > >
        > > I found those here: http://tinyurl.com/27l5hpo
        > >
        > >
        > > Lactic fermentation occurs in the surface of the fermentation.
        > > Clarify your wash for eliminating the probability of other yeasts or bateria to take part of the "party", or don´t if you want they (and clostridium which are bacteria from soil) take part. I´ve done both.
        > > So
        > > You may either ferment your dunder or give your wash a double fermentation. (if using this second technique pull for no more than 1.060 SG or simply the amount of alcohol won´t let bacteria develop. Just dump ´em after yeast fermentation is over (1.020 for molasses wash in my case), wait ´til the cap appears (´round one week) then distill.
        > >
        > > Molasses do have malic acid which will turn to lactic acid.(if using much brown sugar simply peel/mash and add an apple for malic acid, I´ve heared they do it in dunder pits in Jamaica, but hard to beleive).
        > >
        > > According to Fahrasmane and Ganou-Parfait (people for INRA who isolated EDV 493) lactic fermentation are even more important than yeast for the flavor of rum, specially propionic which gives a "terroir" booze.
        > >
        > > I warn you though that MLF may produce ethyl carbamate which is a known carcinogenic, but in the other hand it has been detected even in whiskey.
        > >
        > > Now go for a great rum!
        > >
        > > HTH
        > >
        > > Alex
        > >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.