Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Oaking...

Expand Messages
  • mattdistiller
    Hi everyone, I have an idea for a project, which involves aging some spirit on oak for a long time (3-5 years) to make a quality spirit. I would love to use
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 3, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi everyone,

      I have an idea for a project, which involves aging some spirit on oak
      for a long time (3-5 years) to make a quality spirit. I would love
      to use barrels, but being financially challenged, this is not an
      option (well, not until I'm rich an famous!)

      I have used oak shavings in the past, for a quick oaking (2 - 6
      weeks), and I think I have probably been over-dosing my spirit.
      Having read a little more, and thought about it a lot, I don't think
      oak shavings are the best thing as far as replicating what happens
      commercially. Which brings me to the question(s).

      Oak chips and Mini oak staves are available (and thanks a billion to
      smudge311065 who posted the aussie link yesterday!). I figure these
      would have to be much better than shavings, being more solid like a
      barrel situation. Also, it means I can calculated the surface area,
      and dose my spirit at the same rate as a commercial barrel.

      So, which is better? Am I right in my assumption that shavings are
      good for the 'quick fix', but chips and staves would be better for a
      longer aging? How well can you toast the chips/staves? How well do
      they work for other people?

      As a small aside, I have seen 'Jack Daniels chips' adverstised on a
      Kiwi site - anyone had any luck with these? Are they any better
      than 'ordinary' oak chips?

      So many questions.....!

      Thanks,

      Matt
    • Ian Macsween
      I also have seen similar barrels offered for sale - cut in half - in garden shops. I grieved for their potential. But I have been told that they have already
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 3, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        I also have seen similar barrels offered for sale - cut in half - in garden shops.  I grieved for their potential.  But I have been told that they have already reached their life expectancy for the purposes of our hobby. 
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: glen
        Sent: Wednesday, April 03, 2002 6:44 PM
        Subject: Fw: [Distillers] Oaking...

        there is a place near me in adelaide that does full size wooden barrels for
        $90 au they used to hold french congnac for shipping and now are in the
        graden centre to be chopped in half for pot plants!!  you can buy whole or
        halved!





        Hi everyone,

        I have an idea for a project, which involves aging some spirit on oak
        for a long time (3-5 years) to make a quality spirit.  I would love
        to use barrels, but being financially challenged, this is not an
        option (well, not until I'm rich an famous!)

        I have used oak shavings in the past, for a quick oaking (2 - 6
        weeks), and I think I have probably been over-dosing my spirit.
        Having read a little more, and thought about it a lot, I don't think
        oak shavings are the best thing as far as replicating what happens
        commercially.  Which brings me to the question(s).

        Oak chips and Mini oak staves are available (and thanks a billion to
        smudge311065 who posted the aussie link yesterday!).  I figure these
        would have to be much better than shavings, being more solid like a
        barrel situation.  Also, it means I can calculated the surface area,
        and dose my spirit at the same rate as a commercial barrel.

        So, which is better?  Am I right in my assumption that shavings are
        good for the 'quick fix', but chips and staves would be better for a
        longer aging?  How well can you toast the chips/staves?  How well do
        they work for other people?

        As a small aside, I have seen 'Jack Daniels chips' adverstised on a
        Kiwi site - anyone had any luck with these?  Are they any better
        than 'ordinary' oak chips?

        So many questions.....!

        Thanks,

        Matt






        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/






        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      • mattdistiller
        stillingus , You sent me an email personally, but all messages I send to you are coming back to me with the error: *** ERROR *** I m afraid I wasn t able to
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 4, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          "stillingus",

          You sent me an email personally, but all messages I send to you are
          coming back to me with the error:

          *** ERROR ***

          I'm afraid I wasn't able to deliver your message to the following
          addresses.
          This is a permanent error; I've given up. Sorry it didn't work out.

          Sorry, no mailbox here by that name. (#5.1.1)

          *** END OF ERROR ***

          Have you got another email address that I can send my reply to?

          Thanks,

          Matt
        • mattdistiller
          ... in garden shops. I grieved for their potential. But I have been told that they have already reached their life expectancy for the purposes of our hobby.
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 4, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In Distillers@y..., Ian Macsween <ianelamacsween@s...> wrote:
            > I also have seen similar barrels offered for sale - cut in half -
            in garden shops. I grieved for their potential. But I have been
            told that they have already reached their life expectancy for the
            purposes of our hobby.

            Ian,

            I think (but don't know) that you can recondition the barrels by
            shaving the inside out - this gets rid of the "used" oak, and exposes
            the "fresh" oak. A bit of work though....

            Matt
          • klcampbell
            G day Matt,J.D.chips are available from J.P Kearney Wholesale,108 Musgrave street,Nth.R ton,4701.Phone/Fax:4921 0881,or your local brew shop may have an
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 4, 2002
            • 0 Attachment
              G'day Matt,J.D.chips are available from J.P Kearney Wholesale,108 Musgrave street,Nth.R'ton,4701.Phone/Fax:4921 0881,or your local brew shop may have an account with them.
              I use toasted French oak staves to age neutral spirit for about 12 months and then use a small quantity,around 500Mls.per 2.25Lt.mix with a variety of essences and find them O.K.supplied by winery supplies in Knoxfield,nice people to deal with,
              Trial and error mate,Regards,Ken.  
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Thursday, 4 April 2002 12:39
              Subject: [Distillers] Oaking...

              Hi everyone,

              I have an idea for a project, which involves aging some spirit on oak
              for a long time (3-5 years) to make a quality spirit.  I would love
              to use barrels, but being financially challenged, this is not an
              option (well, not until I'm rich an famous!)

              I have used oak shavings in the past, for a quick oaking (2 - 6
              weeks), and I think I have probably been over-dosing my spirit. 
              Having read a little more, and thought about it a lot, I don't think
              oak shavings are the best thing as far as replicating what happens
              commercially.  Which brings me to the question(s).

              Oak chips and Mini oak staves are available (and thanks a billion to
              smudge311065 who posted the aussie link yesterday!).  I figure these
              would have to be much better than shavings, being more solid like a
              barrel situation.  Also, it means I can calculated the surface area,
              and dose my spirit at the same rate as a commercial barrel.

              So, which is better?  Am I right in my assumption that shavings are
              good for the 'quick fix', but chips and staves would be better for a
              longer aging?  How well can you toast the chips/staves?  How well do
              they work for other people?

              As a small aside, I have seen 'Jack Daniels chips' adverstised on a
              Kiwi site - anyone had any luck with these?  Are they any better
              than 'ordinary' oak chips?

              So many questions.....!

              Thanks,

              Matt




              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
            • Brian Shell - BDS (SC)
              I saw a similar thing a Lowes in the US...Jack Daniels barrels split in two for flower pots. They still smelled like bourbon!
              Message 6 of 15 , Apr 4, 2002
              • 0 Attachment
                I saw a similar thing a Lowes in the US...Jack Daniels barrels split in two
                for flower pots. They still smelled like bourbon!

                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: glen [SMTP:warranty@...]
                > Sent: Wednesday, April 03, 2002 9:44 PM
                > To: distillers
                > Subject: Fw: [Distillers] Oaking...
                >
                > there is a place near me in adelaide that does full size wooden barrels
                > for
                > $90 au they used to hold french congnac for shipping and now are in the
                > graden centre to be chopped in half for pot plants!! you can buy whole or
                > halved!
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Hi everyone,
                >
                > I have an idea for a project, which involves aging some spirit on oak
                > for a long time (3-5 years) to make a quality spirit. I would love
                > to use barrels, but being financially challenged, this is not an
                > option (well, not until I'm rich an famous!)
                >
                > I have used oak shavings in the past, for a quick oaking (2 - 6
                > weeks), and I think I have probably been over-dosing my spirit.
                > Having read a little more, and thought about it a lot, I don't think
                > oak shavings are the best thing as far as replicating what happens
                > commercially. Which brings me to the question(s).
                >
                > Oak chips and Mini oak staves are available (and thanks a billion to
                > smudge311065 who posted the aussie link yesterday!). I figure these
                > would have to be much better than shavings, being more solid like a
                > barrel situation. Also, it means I can calculated the surface area,
                > and dose my spirit at the same rate as a commercial barrel.
                >
                > So, which is better? Am I right in my assumption that shavings are
                > good for the 'quick fix', but chips and staves would be better for a
                > longer aging? How well can you toast the chips/staves? How well do
                > they work for other people?
                >
                > As a small aside, I have seen 'Jack Daniels chips' adverstised on a
                > Kiwi site - anyone had any luck with these? Are they any better
                > than 'ordinary' oak chips?
                >
                > So many questions.....!
                >
                > Thanks,
                >
                > Matt
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                > ADVERTISEMENT
                >
                > <http://rd.yahoo.com/M=215002.1954253.3462811.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=170504
                > 1694:HM/A=1000239/R=0/*http://ads.x10.com/?bHlhaG9vaG0xLmRhd=1017888195%3e
                > M=215002.1954253.3462811.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705041694:HM/A=1000239/R=1
                > >
                >
                > <http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?M=215002.1954253.3462811.1261774/D=egroupm
                > ail/S=1705041694:HM/A=1000239/rand=216329880>
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
                > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
              • Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
                Matt, ... Doesn t that mean that you ll also have to wait as long as the commercial guys do ? eg a minimum of 3 years, maybe 8+ ? ... Also note that as well as
                Message 7 of 15 , Apr 4, 2002
                • 0 Attachment
                  Matt,

                  > barrel situation. Also, it means I can calculated the surface area,
                  > and dose my spirit at the same rate as a commercial barrel.

                  Doesn't that mean that you'll also have to wait as long as the commercial
                  guys do ? eg a minimum of 3 years, maybe 8+ ?


                  > So, which is better? Am I right in my assumption that shavings are
                  > good for the 'quick fix', but chips and staves would be better for a
                  > longer aging? How well can you toast the chips/staves? How well do
                  > they work for other people?

                  Also note that as well as adding compounds to the spirit, and reacting with
                  some of the cogeners present (both which will happen via chips/shavings),
                  the oak by being slightly porous, also acts to help release some of
                  compounds, and also let in a small amount of air etc, both which also affect
                  the flavour changes taking place. I think this might be why adding just oak
                  to a closed bottle doesn't always end up with the exact same result. No
                  smart ideas though on how to address the situation.... though there was a
                  mention a wee while back about using corks during storage, rather than
                  air-tight caps ....


                  Tony
                • moonshiyner
                  ... a ... G day All I use the Jack Daniel chips quite a bit. I give them 3-4 weeks on clean 40% then drink as is with no further flavouring. They leave quite a
                  Message 8 of 15 , Apr 4, 2002
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In Distillers@y..., "mattdistiller" <distiller@m...> wrote:
                    > Hi everyone,

                    > As a small aside, I have seen 'Jack Daniels chips' adverstised on
                    a
                    > Kiwi site - anyone had any luck with these? Are they any better
                    > than 'ordinary' oak chips?

                    G'day All

                    I use the Jack Daniel chips quite a bit.
                    I give them 3-4 weeks on clean 40% then drink as is with no further
                    flavouring. They leave quite a nice JD taste (if possibly a bit thin)
                    The spirit dosn't seem to colour up much with them but I suppose
                    that would be easily rectified.

                    Doug
                  • noelwatson
                    Love all the talk about the different oaking methods. Late last year I was given a dozen 8 inch whisky barrel staves about 12 feet long.(big Barrel) I was
                    Message 9 of 15 , Apr 4, 2002
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Love all the talk about the different oaking methods.
                      Late last year I was given a dozen 8 inch whisky barrel staves about 12 feet
                      long.(big Barrel) I was going to try a couple of methods with the oak:
                      First was to hit it with an electric plane (slightly de-tuned) and use the
                      resulting shavings.
                      Second was to put pieces of the staves through a band saw so the result
                      would be a 1/8 to 1/4 inch slice about 8 inches across by 3 inches high.
                      Any thoughts??
                      regards,
                      Noel
                    • Jeanette Dunphy
                      Went to the Glenfiditch distillary in 94. They put their regular whiskey in old sherry casks. That is supposed to give the colour and add a little bit of
                      Message 10 of 15 , Apr 5, 2002
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Went to the Glenfiditch distillary in "94. They put
                        their regular whiskey in old sherry casks. That is
                        supposed to give the colour and add a little bit of
                        flavour as well.

                        On the tour, they opened the fermentation vats so we
                        could all have a look and a smell.
                        I leaned over and too a big lung full.
                        The tour guide then yelled, WINDOW!
                        I nearly ruined an entire batch.

                        Jeanette

                        http://www.sold.com.au - SOLD.com.au Auctions
                        - 1,000s of Bargains!
                      • hexenwolfe
                        ... oak ... think ... to ... these ... area, ... a ... do ... Matt, The purpose of barrel aging of whiskey is more complicated than just flavoring from the
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jun 10, 2004
                        • 0 Attachment
                          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mattdistiller" <distiller@m...>
                          wrote:
                          > Hi everyone,
                          >
                          > I have an idea for a project, which involves aging some spirit on
                          oak
                          > for a long time (3-5 years) to make a quality spirit. I would love
                          > to use barrels, but being financially challenged, this is not an
                          > option (well, not until I'm rich an famous!)
                          >
                          > I have used oak shavings in the past, for a quick oaking (2 - 6
                          > weeks), and I think I have probably been over-dosing my spirit.
                          > Having read a little more, and thought about it a lot, I don't
                          think
                          > oak shavings are the best thing as far as replicating what happens
                          > commercially. Which brings me to the question(s).
                          >
                          > Oak chips and Mini oak staves are available (and thanks a billion
                          to
                          > smudge311065 who posted the aussie link yesterday!). I figure
                          these
                          > would have to be much better than shavings, being more solid like a
                          > barrel situation. Also, it means I can calculated the surface
                          area,
                          > and dose my spirit at the same rate as a commercial barrel.
                          >
                          > So, which is better? Am I right in my assumption that shavings are
                          > good for the 'quick fix', but chips and staves would be better for
                          a
                          > longer aging? How well can you toast the chips/staves? How well
                          do
                          > they work for other people?
                          >
                          > As a small aside, I have seen 'Jack Daniels chips' adverstised on a
                          > Kiwi site - anyone had any luck with these? Are they any better
                          > than 'ordinary' oak chips?
                          >
                          > So many questions.....!
                          >
                          > Thanks,
                          >
                          > Matt


                          Matt,
                          The purpose of barrel aging of whiskey is more complicated than just
                          flavoring from the oak. Oak is porous and there is a continual
                          interaction between the enclosed whiskey and the oxygen in the air.
                          The process involves a slow oxidation of complex chemicals into
                          simpler ones, as well as the leaching of tannins and sugars from the
                          oak into the whiskey. Simply placing whiskey in contact with oak in
                          an environment that does not allow for slow oxidation and breathing of
                          the aging whiskey will miss out on this important part of the aging
                          process. I would hate to see you wait 3 years and then be disappointed.
                          Cheers,
                          Hex
                        • SHINE~ ô¿ô
                          For quick oaking I toast my oak chips then boil 1 gal. of water. Pour the water over the chips and let it cool. I use this water to cut my 95% spirit s down to
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jun 10, 2004
                          • 0 Attachment
                            For quick oaking I toast my oak chips then boil 1 gal. of
                            water. Pour the water over the chips and let it cool. I use
                            this water to cut my 95% spirit's down to 60%, this gives
                            it a nice color and allso helps the taste. To age it I trash
                            the bottle caps use cork stoppers and store it like you
                            would wine. I have a few bottles that are more than 15
                            years old and the taste of it and shine made the same
                            way last week is like night and day!

                            Just my thoughts, DJ Shine
                            Matt,
                            The purpose of barrel aging of whiskey is more complicated than just
                            flavoring from the oak. Oak is porous and there is a continual
                            interaction between the enclosed whiskey and the oxygen in the air.
                            The process involves a slow oxidation of complex chemicals into
                            simpler ones, as well as the leaching of tannins and sugars from the
                            oak into the whiskey. Simply placing whiskey in contact with oak in
                            an environment that does not allow for slow oxidation and breathing of
                            the aging whiskey will miss out on this important part of the aging
                            process. I would hate to see you wait 3 years and then be disappointed.
                            Cheers,
                            Hex



                            Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
                            FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org


                            Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                            ADVERTISEMENT





                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Yahoo! Groups Links

                            a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/

                            b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                            Distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                            c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Austin Smith
                            I did a small (500ml) amount of brown sugar (rum) distillate on toasted JD BBQ chips. Seemed to work very well. I suggest buying a bag full and giving it a
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jun 11, 2004
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I did a small (500ml) amount of brown sugar (rum) distillate on toasted JD BBQ chips. Seemed to work very well. I suggest buying a bag full and giving it a try.

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • David
                              I do the same but with regular suger and it worksgood. How long do you let it sit on the chips? ... toasted JD BBQ chips. Seemed to work very well. I suggest
                              Message 14 of 15 , Jun 11, 2004
                              • 0 Attachment
                                I do the same but with regular suger and it worksgood. How long do
                                you let it sit on the chips?

                                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Austin Smith" <asmith1@b...>
                                wrote:
                                > I did a small (500ml) amount of brown sugar (rum) distillate on
                                toasted JD BBQ chips. Seemed to work very well. I suggest buying a
                                bag full and giving it a try.
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Austin Smith
                                The last bottle sat for months, with periodic agitation. Nice color and bouquet. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                Message 15 of 15 , Jun 11, 2004
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  The last bottle sat for months, with periodic agitation. Nice color and bouquet.

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.