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Re: wooden stills

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  • waljaco
    Here is an example - http://www.manalagi.com/jamesplace/indonesia/sopi/index.html wal
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 29, 2010
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      Here is an example -

      http://www.manalagi.com/jamesplace/indonesia/sopi/index.html

      wal

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
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      > Lane,
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      > The subject came up a couple of years ago, and it got me thinking about possible wooden designs. If a little bit of copper is allowed (like for steam injection and a coolant worm inside a wooden lyne arm) bamboo just might make a pretty good still. I'll bet in locales where large-diameter bamboo is available, sombody's been making bamboo lightning for centuries.
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      > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
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      > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > From: lbc471965@...
      > Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2010 22:35:57 +0000
      > Subject: [Distillers] wooden stills
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      > was doing some reading and it struck me that i was reading about the coffey still originally was made of wood as was some ancient pot stills before they began using copper or in some cases pure tin..... in my search to find what type or kind of wood it just mentioned "local woods" is there any who could shed some light on the type of wood,whether it was green,seasoned,aged or anything more. there seems to be only 1 wooden coffey still in use today.i kinda wondered how it would help blend flavors of rums made from 1 batch to another..... a new project maybe to tinker with.....
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      > thanx in advance for your helpful insight and information
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    • Harry
      ... Absolutely fascinating! But I don t think I d share a cup of sopi. I ll stick to my rum & whisky. :) Slainte! regards Harry
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 30, 2010
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        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here is an example -
        >
        > http://www.manalagi.com/jamesplace/indonesia/sopi/index.html
        >
        > wal


        Absolutely fascinating! But I don't think I'd share a cup of sopi. I'll stick to my rum & whisky. :)


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • waljaco
        Apparently the wood cover gives the distillate a flavour complexity! wal
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 30, 2010
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          Apparently the wood cover gives the distillate a flavour complexity!
          wal

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
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          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Here is an example -
          > >
          > > http://www.manalagi.com/jamesplace/indonesia/sopi/index.html
          > >
          > > wal
          >
          >
          > Absolutely fascinating! But I don't think I'd share a cup of sopi. I'll stick to my rum & whisky. :)
          >
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          > Slainte!
          > regards Harry
          >
        • lane
          yes wal ...it was the article about EL DORADO rum that got me to wondering what wood was being used.... is it a light oak or maple? or is it another type of
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 30, 2010
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            yes wal ...it was the article about EL DORADO rum that got me to wondering what wood was being used.... is it a light oak or maple? or is it another type of wood that we might otherwise use to impart flavor to our whiskies n rums. maybe the wood and past rum distilations stills impart flavor as its distilled rather than soaking the wood after you have run off a batch.
            what if one was to hollow out say a 6"x2" in{or diameter of your still} piece of the wood that you could place in your still for the steam to work on on its way to the condenser. maybe down low where the alcohol percentages are not as high. was the wood in these stills part of the nuance of the older whiskies n rums? or was the introduction of copper what "cleaned"up the older drinks?
            BUTT it still beggs the question? what type of wood was the coffey still and old pot stills made of?
            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
            >
            > Wood staves in pot stills are only used in the upper portion. Typical for traditional Chinese stills.
            > I think the wooden Coffey stills used once in Canada were filled with pebbles...
            > wal
            >
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "lane" <lbc471965@> wrote:
            > >
            > > was doing some reading and it struck me that i was reading about the coffey still originally was made of wood as was some ancient pot stills before they began using copper or in some cases pure tin..... in my search to find what type or kind of wood it just mentioned "local woods" is there any who could shed some light on the type of wood,whether it was green,seasoned,aged or anything more. there seems to be only 1 wooden coffey still in use today.i kinda wondered how it would help blend flavors of rums made from 1 batch to another..... a new project maybe to tinker with.....
            > >
            > >
            > > thanx in advance for your helpful insight and information
            > >
            >
          • waljaco
            I suspect local Brazilian hardwoods. They used wood to save money. There are other ways to get flavor - dunder or the Venezuelan way of making a heavy mother
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 30, 2010
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              I suspect local Brazilian hardwoods. They used wood to save money. There are other ways to get flavor - dunder or the Venezuelan way of making a heavy mother rum in an oak cask.
              wal

              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "lane" <lbc471965@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > yes wal ...it was the article about EL DORADO rum that got me to wondering what wood was being used.... is it a light oak or maple? or is it another type of wood that we might otherwise use to impart flavor to our whiskies n rums. maybe the wood and past rum distilations stills impart flavor as its distilled rather than soaking the wood after you have run off a batch.
              > what if one was to hollow out say a 6"x2" in{or diameter of your still} piece of the wood that you could place in your still for the steam to work on on its way to the condenser. maybe down low where the alcohol percentages are not as high. was the wood in these stills part of the nuance of the older whiskies n rums? or was the introduction of copper what "cleaned"up the older drinks?
              > BUTT it still beggs the question? what type of wood was the coffey still and old pot stills made of?
              > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Wood staves in pot stills are only used in the upper portion. Typical for traditional Chinese stills.
              > > I think the wooden Coffey stills used once in Canada were filled with pebbles...
              > > wal
              > >
              > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "lane" <lbc471965@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > was doing some reading and it struck me that i was reading about the coffey still originally was made of wood as was some ancient pot stills before they began using copper or in some cases pure tin..... in my search to find what type or kind of wood it just mentioned "local woods" is there any who could shed some light on the type of wood,whether it was green,seasoned,aged or anything more. there seems to be only 1 wooden coffey still in use today.i kinda wondered how it would help blend flavors of rums made from 1 batch to another..... a new project maybe to tinker with.....
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > thanx in advance for your helpful insight and information
              > > >
              > >
              >
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