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Re: [Distillers] Re: White oak vs. red oak?

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  • Compute User
    The cell ends of White Oak are not glued shut with lignin as they are in the Red Oak group. This means if you split a smallish piece (less that 1 x1  buy
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 11, 2010
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      The cell "ends" of White Oak are not "glued" shut with lignin as they are in the Red Oak group.
      This means if you split a smallish piece (less that 1"x1" buy 2 to 3 inches long) and put one end under water, you will be able to blow though it and see bubbles.
      You could also cut a very thin transverse section and look under a microscope to see if the cell ends are ligninfied.
      When dried, White Oak also tastes sweeter and noticeably less bitter than the Red Oaks if you chaw up a hunk. 

      --- On Wed, 1/6/10, Rufus <rufusroughguts@...> wrote:

      From: Rufus <rufusroughguts@...>
      Subject: [Distillers] Re: White oak vs. red oak?
      To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, January 6, 2010, 8:04 AM

       
      Riku, Generally, white Oak wood is white or very light yellow just after it has been cut. Red oak is a light shade of red or has a light reddish tint to the wood - just after being cut.

      The easiest way to discern them is during the summer while the leaves are on the trees. White oak leaves are rounded at the tips and red oak are pointed.

      White oak bark is very rough and red oak is much smoother too.

      I can't remember all the reasons but aging barrels for spirits or wine are made from white oak never red. Hope this helps.

      Regards,
      R

      --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > A question to the experts, how do you identify whether a piece of timber is white oak or red oak?
      >
      > Slainte, Riku
      >


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