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  • Rufus Roughguts
    Riku Identification isĀ easiest by looking at the end grain - at least on the oak that grows on my farm . In the pictures below (taken from the internet) the
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 7, 2010
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      Riku Identification is easiest by looking at the end grain - at least on the oak that grows on my farm . In the pictures below (taken from the internet) the top is red oak and the bottom is white oak - both were milled about and air dried. Red oak grows fast in New England and will normally have 4 to 6 rings to the inch while white oak is a slow grower and have more rings per inch. You can easily see the canals in the red oak whereas the white oak displays "rays".  Oak changes color quickly once exposed to air so the red and white rule isn't accurate after you've dried the wood.  I'm not an expert on oak (or any other species)  but I did build the frame, floors and trim of of my home out of solid white and red oak so I'm familiar with the wood.  Though I haven't read too much on the subject I'd be interested in better understanding how different species of wood can be used to flavor spirits.  As mentioned by Geoff, you can't make barrels out of red oak but that doesn't mean you couldn't use them to flavor spirts or wine.  Has anyone tried aging spirits with wood other than French or American White Oak?

       
      Regards,
      R

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