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The Milky Way

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  • waljaco
    Matt Rowley has apparently a nostalgia for a drink from his younger days - milk! http://tinyurl.com/ydhrlm5 Being an imbiber of fermented milk, I took a brief
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 3, 2010
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      Matt Rowley has apparently a nostalgia for a drink from his younger days - milk!

      http://tinyurl.com/ydhrlm5

      Being an imbiber of fermented milk, I took a brief look into the ingredient which is the only real food produced by Mother Nature.

      The oldest source I have is a recipe for 'Milk Caudle or Punch' from the 1604 manuscript of Lady Elinor Fetiplace, published in 'Elinor Fettiplace's Receipt Book, Elizabethan Country House Cooking' by Hilary Spurling, 1986.

      "Milk Caudle or Punch
      Take a pinte of Cowe whot milk, the yolks of ten eggs, beat it very well together, put therto halfe a pinte of good rose water, & a pinte of sack, & as much sugar as will sweeten it, & between two cups brew it as you doo buttered Beere, & in the morning fasting drink a good draught of it."

      The use of milk with alcohol crossed the Atlantic and we have a 1763 recipe for Milk Punch by Benjamin Franklin -

      http://tinyurl.com/lkrf53

      Milk Punch recipes were popular in Victorian times and for example there are several in 'Oxford Night Caps', Richard Cook, 1835.

      http://tinyurl.com/yd925sx

      Pellegrino Artusi in his 'La Scienza in Cocina e l'Arte di Mangiar Bene', 1891 has a recipe for 'Rosolio tedesco' which is a typical milk punch and the name 'German Rosolio' shows its northern origin.
      Here is an English translation -

      http://tinyurl.com/ydfkkj2

      It also appears as 'Crema di Limoncello/Limoncello Cream'

      http://tinyurl.com/yea4q6t

      Milk as a fining agent also appears in such recipes as Almond Shrub and Falernum. Milk was also used to remove congeners before a second distillation.

      wal
    • waljaco
      Here are 2 more English Milk Punch recipes from English Housewifry by Elizabeth Moxon, 1764. They illustrate 2 types - one where the casein is coagulated by
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 3, 2010
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        Here are 2 more English Milk Punch recipes from 'English Housewifry' by Elizabeth Moxon, 1764. They illustrate 2 types - one where the casein is coagulated by citric acid and the other where the whole milk is used. It is similar to the 1764 recipe of Benjamin Franklin.

        "To make MILK PUNCH
        Take two quarts of old milk, a quart of good brandy, the juice of six lemons or oranges, whether you please, and about six ounces of loaf sugar, mix them altogether and drop them thro' a jelly bag; take off the peel of two of the lemons or oranges, and put it into your bag, when it is run off bottle it, 'twill keep as long as you please.

        To make MILK PUNCH another Way
        Take three jills of water, a jill of old milk, and a jill of brandy, sweeten it to your taste; you must not put any acid into this for it will make it curdle.

        This is a cooling punch to drink in a morning."

        Note: 4 gills = 1 pint
        2 pints = 1 quart

        wal

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
        >
        > Matt Rowley has apparently a nostalgia for a drink from his younger days - milk!
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/ydhrlm5
        >
        > Being an imbiber of fermented milk, I took a brief look into the ingredient which is the only real food produced by Mother Nature.
        >
        > The oldest source I have is a recipe for 'Milk Caudle or Punch' from the 1604 manuscript of Lady Elinor Fetiplace, published in 'Elinor Fettiplace's Receipt Book, Elizabethan Country House Cooking' by Hilary Spurling, 1986.
        >
        > "Milk Caudle or Punch
        > Take a pinte of Cowe whot milk, the yolks of ten eggs, beat it very well together, put therto halfe a pinte of good rose water, & a pinte of sack, & as much sugar as will sweeten it, & between two cups brew it as you doo buttered Beere, & in the morning fasting drink a good draught of it."
        >
        > The use of milk with alcohol crossed the Atlantic and we have a 1763 recipe for Milk Punch by Benjamin Franklin -
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/lkrf53
        >
        > Milk Punch recipes were popular in Victorian times and for example there are several in 'Oxford Night Caps', Richard Cook, 1835.
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/yd925sx
        >
        > Pellegrino Artusi in his 'La Scienza in Cocina e l'Arte di Mangiar Bene', 1891 has a recipe for 'Rosolio tedesco' which is a typical milk punch and the name 'German Rosolio' shows its northern origin.
        > Here is an English translation -
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/ydfkkj2
        >
        > It also appears as 'Crema di Limoncello/Limoncello Cream'
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/yea4q6t
        >
        > Milk as a fining agent also appears in such recipes as Almond Shrub and Falernum. Milk was also used to remove congeners before a second distillation.
        >
        > wal
        >
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