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Re: VM thermometer placement

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  • geoff
    Hi Kevin and guys, Seems like my tiny link doesn t work so try this tiny link http://tiny.cc/94UXr Geoff
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 10, 2009
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      Hi Kevin and guys,

            Seems like my tiny link doesn’t work so try this tiny link http://tiny.cc/94UXr

      Geoff
    • abbababbaccc
      I suppose a cornelius keg would be quite perfect to for this application. You could even add an inline filter to the line to clear the mash at the same time.
      Message 2 of 18 , Dec 10, 2009
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        I suppose a cornelius keg would be quite perfect to for this application. You could even add an inline filter to the line to clear the mash at the same time.

        Slainte, Riku

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff" <jeffrey.burrows@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi Kevin,
        > >
        > > If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement. You can make light work of carrying/pumping your mash upstairs. (You could also use a filtered air supply from an over pressurized spare wheel).
        > >
        > > Please bear with me, Volkswagen used this method in their early post WW2 Volkswagen Beetles to pump water up to their car windscreen (from the over pressurized spare wheel in the trunk/boot in the front of the car) years before electric windscreen washers ever became fashionable.
        > >
        > > Put your mash into a tightly air-sealed container. Put the compressed filtered inlet air supply from compressor in through the lid and into the air gap above your mash. Now put a siphon cane down through a good tight fitting rubber grommet through the lid and down into your mash, stopping about one inch above the container base or just above the settled mash/trub. Tighten and securely attach a hose to the siphon cane.
        > >
        > > The filtered compressed air presses down upon the mash surface forcing the mash up the siphon cane near the base of the mash up into the hose and up stairs. Switch the compressor on and off (Don't over-pressurize the air gap) until all the mash is in your container upstairs. Mission accomplished and no back ache or spilt mash. Try this pdf in the files section link for a rough sketch http://tiny.cc/oEsif
        > >
        > > Geoff
        > >
        > Thanks for the tip Geoff,
        >
        > I'll check out the file you uploaded and see what I can figure out, It might work for me.
        > Thanks again,
        > Slainte,
        > Kevin
        >
      • nwvapors66
        That would work fine, another thing to ponder. I am still working on air cooling my reflux. Do you know of a calculator/program to determine the energy at the
        Message 3 of 18 , Dec 15, 2009
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          That would work fine, another thing to ponder. I am still working on air cooling my reflux. Do you know of a calculator/program to determine the energy at the condenser? I am trying to decide on the # of finned tubes I will need, keep in mind I am an artist not a mathematician. Formulas sometimes make my eyes go crossed.

          Slainte,
          Kevin

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...> wrote:
          >
          > I suppose a cornelius keg would be quite perfect to for this application. You could even add an inline filter to the line to clear the mash at the same time.
          >
          > Slainte, Riku
          >
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff" <jeffrey.burrows@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hi Kevin,
          > > >
          > > > If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement. You can make light work of carrying/pumping your mash upstairs. (You could also use a filtered air supply from an over pressurized spare wheel).
          > > >
          > > > Please bear with me, Volkswagen used this method in their early post WW2 Volkswagen Beetles to pump water up to their car windscreen (from the over pressurized spare wheel in the trunk/boot in the front of the car) years before electric windscreen washers ever became fashionable.
          > > >
          > > > Put your mash into a tightly air-sealed container. Put the compressed filtered inlet air supply from compressor in through the lid and into the air gap above your mash. Now put a siphon cane down through a good tight fitting rubber grommet through the lid and down into your mash, stopping about one inch above the container base or just above the settled mash/trub. Tighten and securely attach a hose to the siphon cane.
          > > >
          > > > The filtered compressed air presses down upon the mash surface forcing the mash up the siphon cane near the base of the mash up into the hose and up stairs. Switch the compressor on and off (Don't over-pressurize the air gap) until all the mash is in your container upstairs. Mission accomplished and no back ache or spilt mash. Try this pdf in the files section link for a rough sketch http://tiny.cc/oEsif
          > > >
          > > > Geoff
          > > >
          > > Thanks for the tip Geoff,
          > >
          > > I'll check out the file you uploaded and see what I can figure out, It might work for me.
          > > Thanks again,
          > > Slainte,
          > > Kevin
          > >
          >
        • Michael
          I know the latent heat to be removed for water is 970 BTUs per pound, plus add 1 BTU per degree F of sensible heat removed IE: going from 180 degrees to 65
          Message 4 of 18 , Dec 15, 2009
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            I know the latent heat to be removed for water is 970 BTUs per pound, plus add 1 BTU per degree F of sensible heat removed IE: going from 180 degrees to 65 degrees = 115.
            115 + 970 = 1085 BTU per pound of water. 8.34 pounds of water in a gallon
            Somewhere around ½ Ltr per pound

            So to cool 180 degree steam to 65 degree liquid you would have to remove 1085 BTUs per ½ Liter

            How much air needed to do that ???? I will look it up

            Johnnie Sisco


            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@...> wrote:
            >
            > That would work fine, another thing to ponder. I am still working on air cooling my reflux. Do you know of a calculator/program to determine the energy at the condenser? I am trying to decide on the # of finned tubes I will need, keep in mind I am an artist not a mathematician. Formulas sometimes make my eyes go crossed.
            >
            > Slainte,
            > Kevin
            >
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I suppose a cornelius keg would be quite perfect to for this application. You could even add an inline filter to the line to clear the mash at the same time.
            > >
            > > Slainte, Riku
            > >
            > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff" <jeffrey.burrows@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Hi Kevin,
            > > > >
            > > > > If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement. You can make light work of carrying/pumping your mash upstairs. (You could also use a filtered air supply from an over pressurized spare wheel).
            > > > >
            > > > > Please bear with me, Volkswagen used this method in their early post WW2 Volkswagen Beetles to pump water up to their car windscreen (from the over pressurized spare wheel in the trunk/boot in the front of the car) years before electric windscreen washers ever became fashionable.
            > > > >
            > > > > Put your mash into a tightly air-sealed container. Put the compressed filtered inlet air supply from compressor in through the lid and into the air gap above your mash. Now put a siphon cane down through a good tight fitting rubber grommet through the lid and down into your mash, stopping about one inch above the container base or just above the settled mash/trub. Tighten and securely attach a hose to the siphon cane.
            > > > >
            > > > > The filtered compressed air presses down upon the mash surface forcing the mash up the siphon cane near the base of the mash up into the hose and up stairs. Switch the compressor on and off (Don't over-pressurize the air gap) until all the mash is in your container upstairs. Mission accomplished and no back ache or spilt mash. Try this pdf in the files section link for a rough sketch http://tiny.cc/oEsif
            > > > >
            > > > > Geoff
            > > > >
            > > > Thanks for the tip Geoff,
            > > >
            > > > I'll check out the file you uploaded and see what I can figure out, It might work for me.
            > > > Thanks again,
            > > > Slainte,
            > > > Kevin
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Michael
            Ok I have a formula 3 BTUs per 1 CFM of air moved across the coil with a 20 degree F. differential of the inlet to outlet air. Design for an A/C coil ...
            Message 5 of 18 , Dec 15, 2009
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              Ok I have a formula 3 BTUs per 1 CFM of air moved across the coil with a 20 degree F.  differential of the inlet to outlet air.     Design for an A/C coil  


              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@...> wrote:
              >
              > That would work fine, another thing to ponder. I am still working on air cooling my reflux. Do you know of a calculator/program to determine the energy at the condenser? I am trying to decide on the # of finned tubes I will need, keep in mind I am an artist not a mathematician. Formulas sometimes make my eyes go crossed.
              >
              > Slainte,
              > Kevin
              >
              > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" abbababbaccc@ wrote:
              > >
              > > I suppose a cornelius keg would be quite perfect to for this application. You could even add an inline filter to the line to clear the mash at the same time.
              > >
              > > Slainte, Riku
              > >
              > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff" <jeffrey.burrows@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > Hi Kevin,
              > > > >
              > > > > If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement. You can make light work of carrying/pumping your mash upstairs. (You could also use a filtered air supply from an over pressurized spare wheel).
              > > > >
              > > > > Please bear with me, Volkswagen used this method in their early post WW2 Volkswagen Beetles to pump water up to their car windscreen (from the over pressurized spare wheel in the trunk/boot in the front of the car) years before electric windscreen washers ever became fashionable.
              > > > >
              > > > > Put your mash into a tightly air-sealed container. Put the compressed filtered inlet air supply from compressor in through the lid and into the air gap above your mash. Now put a siphon cane down through a good tight fitting rubber grommet through the lid and down into your mash, stopping about one inch above the container base or just above the settled mash/trub. Tighten and securely attach a hose to the siphon cane.
              > > > >
              > > > > The filtered compressed air presses down upon the mash surface forcing the mash up the siphon cane near the base of the mash up into the hose and up stairs. Switch the compressor on and off (Don't over-pressurize the air gap) until all the mash is in your container upstairs. Mission accomplished and no back ache or spilt mash. Try this pdf in the files section link for a rough sketch http://tiny.cc/oEsif
              > > > >
              > > > > Geoff
              > > > >
              > > > Thanks for the tip Geoff,
              > > >
              > > > I'll check out the file you uploaded and see what I can figure out, It might work for me.
              > > > Thanks again,
              > > > Slainte,
              > > > Kevin
              > > >
              > >
              >

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